Cheap tandem

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Tim Steele, May 19, 2003.

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  1. Tim Steele

    Tim Steele Guest

    Courtesy of another uk.rec.cycling person we are now the proud owners of an Ammaco Other Half
    MTB tandem.

    OK, it's a bit basic, and a friend who is very knowledgeable seems to think the most worrying aspect
    of it is the back wheel which might collapse. It looks very much like a standard 26" MTB rear wheel
    with a cheap hub, screw-on 6 speed freewheel, alloy rim and basic spokes. The simplest upgrade would
    be to replace the spokes with stainless.. what do u.r.c readers think?

    Tim
     
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  2. Orienteer

    Orienteer Guest

    "Tim Steele" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    > Courtesy of another uk.rec.cycling person we are now the proud owners of
    an
    > Ammaco Other Half MTB tandem.
    >
    > OK, it's a bit basic, and a friend who is very knowledgeable seems to
    think
    > the most worrying aspect of it is the back wheel which might collapse. It looks very much like a
    > standard 26" MTB rear wheel with a cheap hub, screw-on 6 speed freewheel, alloy rim and basic
    > spokes. The simplest
    upgrade
    > would be to replace the spokes with stainless.. what do u.r.c readers
    think?
    >
    > Tim
    >
    >
    Actually I believe stainless spokes are less strong than ordinary steel spokes; their advantage is
    in corrosion resistance.

    Depends how heavy the riders are. A new hub and wheel with more spokes would be the first
    upgrade to try.
     
  3. W K

    W K Guest

    "Orienteer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Tim Steele" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:p[email protected]...
    > > Courtesy of another uk.rec.cycling person we are now the proud owners of
    > an
    > > Ammaco Other Half MTB tandem.
    > >
    > > OK, it's a bit basic, and a friend who is very knowledgeable seems to
    > think
    > > the most worrying aspect of it is the back wheel which might collapse.
    It
    > > looks very much like a standard 26" MTB rear wheel with a cheap hub, screw-on 6 speed freewheel,
    > > alloy rim and basic spokes. The simplest
    > upgrade
    > > would be to replace the spokes with stainless.. what do u.r.c readers
    > think?
    > >
    > > Tim
    > >
    > >
    > Actually I believe stainless spokes are less strong than ordinary steel spokes; their advantage is
    > in corrosion resistance.
    >
    > Depends how heavy the riders are. A new hub and wheel with more spokes
    would
    > be the first upgrade to try.

    Actually a PROPERLY built wheel is a first try. And you might not get this even from a fairly
    respected bike shop (I didn't).

    I'm not sure about that freewheel, would it be possible to get something built on a 36H 7 speed
    cassette hub with the same OLN. I'd bet its only 130mm.

    Perhaps the best plan is to keep this bike away from loaded touring, and only use it for localish
    trips. I've got a low price Orbit and I'm bothered that I;m throwing good money after bad.
     
  4. Guy Chapman

    Guy Chapman Guest

    "Tim Steele" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > a friend who is very knowledgeable seems to think the most worrying aspect of it is the back wheel
    > which might collapse. It looks very much like a standard 26" MTB rear wheel with a cheap hub,
    > screw-on 6 speed freewheel, alloy rim and basic spokes. The simplest upgrade would be to replace
    > the spokes with stainless.. what do u.r.c readers think?

    26" wheels are pretty tough - have you counted the spokes? I have a triplet with 48-spoke 26"
    wheels. Sir Robin of Bridgewater is a Big Fan of 26" tandem wheels.

    Screw-on freeweheel is not in itself a bad thing - after all, you don't need to replace it until it
    wears out :)

    I would check that all the spokes have even tension, and if not get it retensioned by a good
    wheelbuilder. That makes far more difference than material or number of spokes, IME - again, if
    you ride and never break a spoke, why worry - and if you break a spoke first time out then you
    need to Do Stuff.

    Me, I'd be inclined to try a few modest rides and see what rattles.
     
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