Cheap tubular tires ??

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by B, Aug 18, 2005.

  1. B

    B Guest

    Hello:

    I am looking for a good source for inexpensive 700C tubulars suitable
    for training on relatively rough roads. I am a big rider (210) and would
    prefer something more durable yet reasonably light weight.

    A Canadian source would be the best soulution, although I am open to US
    dealer(s).

    Cheers,

    Bruce
     
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  2. bfd

    bfd Guest

    Two sources you may want to look at:

    In the US, Andy Muzi's Yellow Jersey sells clement or a variation of it
    for $20 each or the bargain deal of 3 tires for $50US:

    http://www.yellowjersey.org/tt.html

    Alternatively, La Bicicletta is in Canada and use to have "bulk special
    deals" on tubies if you bought like 10 or more:

    http://www.labicicletta.com/edatcat/cad/tlsstore.cgi?user_action=list&category=Tubular Tires


    Finally, check out World Class Cycles for their tubie deals:

    http://www.worldclasscycles.com/tubular-price2.htm
     
  3. B wrote:
    > Hello:
    >
    > I am looking for a good source for inexpensive 700C tubulars suitable
    > for training on relatively rough roads. I am a big rider (210) and would
    > prefer something more durable yet reasonably light weight.
    >
    > A Canadian source would be the best soulution, although I am open to US
    > dealer(s).


    I can't speak for Muzi's training tubulars deal, but in general these
    days cheap tubulars don't seem to be worth it. I've had good success
    with Conti Sprinters which can be found for US$50. They are twice as
    reliable- half the flats- and have twice the quality- the casings are
    straight, while cheaper tires are hit or miss- as tires costing half as
    much. I don't know about your weight with the Sprinters, though, since
    I weigh 50lbs less than you. I have not had good results with the Conti
    Giro.

    OTOH, if someone *can* vouch for Muzi's deal, I just might sign up for
    some myself.

    Also, I only ride a few thousand miles a year so my recent tire
    sampling is small.
     
  4. bfd

    bfd Guest

    My question is if you're willing to spend US$50 per tire, why not spend
    that same for THREE tires and give it a try? It won't cost you any more
    than what you're paying for one tire now and you'll get 3 tires. If
    they're no good, then you won't be out much!
     
  5. bfd wrote:
    > My question is if you're willing to spend US$50 per tire, why not spend
    > that same for THREE tires and give it a try? It won't cost you any more
    > than what you're paying for one tire now and you'll get 3 tires. If
    > they're no good, then you won't be out much!


    Good question. The answer is that one tire that costs $50 and has 1/2
    the flats of a $25 tire and rolls straighter than the $25 tire and is
    less likely to need returning because of bumps in it, is worth more
    than twice as much as a $25 tire because it is much less hassle.
    (They're also lighter, if that matters.) I think the tires that I use
    now are a better buy at $50 than the $25 tires I am aware of, and since
    there is a correlation between price and performance I am not willing
    to take a chance on $16.50 tires without having solid information that
    they will give me performance approaching what I already have, nothing
    against Andrew Muzi who is offering a good deal on them. Call me
    conservative.
     
  6. bfd wrote:
    > Two sources you may want to look at:
    >
    > In the US, Andy Muzi's Yellow Jersey sells clement or a variation of it
    > for $20 each or the bargain deal of 3 tires for $50US:
    >
    > http://www.yellowjersey.org/tt.html


    I ride these and like them very much. Straight, nice riding, light
    (280 grams according to the 'weight weenies' site), durable, and cheap.
    What more could you want?

    These tires are half the price of a comparable quality clincher + tube,
    and ride better.
     
  7. bfd wrote:
    > Two sources you may want to look at:
    >
    > In the US, Andy Muzi's Yellow Jersey sells clement or a variation of it
    > for $20 each or the bargain deal of 3 tires for $50US:
    >
    > http://www.yellowjersey.org/tt.html


    I should add that outside of Veloflex, Tufo, and Dugast, virtually all
    other tubulars available in the US are made in the Lion Tire plant in
    Thailand, including EVERY Vittoria model. So basically with the Yellow
    Jersey deal, you're getting a 220TPI Vittoria at around 17 bucks a tire.
     
  8. [email protected] wrote:
    > bfd wrote:
    > > Two sources you may want to look at:
    > >
    > > In the US, Andy Muzi's Yellow Jersey sells clement or a variation of it
    > > for $20 each or the bargain deal of 3 tires for $50US:
    > >
    > > http://www.yellowjersey.org/tt.html

    >
    > I should add that outside of Veloflex, Tufo, and Dugast, virtually all
    > other tubulars available in the US are made in the Lion Tire plant in
    > Thailand, including EVERY Vittoria model. So basically with the Yellow
    > Jersey deal, you're getting a 220TPI Vittoria at around 17 bucks a tire.


    And to beat the other bike nerds to the punch, I'll admit that I forgot
    high end conti's are made in Germany.
     
  9. [email protected] wrote:

    > I can't speak for Muzi's training tubulars deal, but in general these
    > days cheap tubulars don't seem to be worth it. I've had good success
    > with Conti Sprinters which can be found for US$50. They are twice as
    > reliable- half the flats- and have twice the quality- the casings are
    > straight, while cheaper tires are hit or miss- as tires costing half as
    > much. I don't know about your weight with the Sprinters, though, since
    > I weigh 50lbs less than you. I have not had good results with the Conti
    > Giro.


    I don't think you can draw that direct a correlation between price and
    puncture resistance. Who hasn't attributed an untimely puncture of any
    tire to simple bad luck?
    I never had good success with Conti Sprinters. I found them hard to
    mount, lumpy, and not particularly puncture-resistant.
    I like Vittorias. You can buy them mail-order from Great Britain for
    half what they retail for here in the USA. For example, ProBikeKit.com
    sells Vittoria Corsa's for under $40 each.
     
  10. On Thu, 18 Aug 2005 10:17:40 -0600, B wrote:

    > Hello:
    >
    > I am looking for a good source for inexpensive 700C tubulars suitable
    > for training on relatively rough roads. I am a big rider (210) and would
    > prefer something more durable yet reasonably light weight.


    At your weight, you are not going to do well on a cheap tubular even on
    good roads. In my experience, cheap tubulars today are junk. People wax
    poetic talking about the ride of good tubulars, but those will cost $50+
    per tire, and still will not last well for a 200+ pound rider on rough
    roads.

    You'd do well to consider decent clinchers for this purpose. Save your
    tubular wheels for racing.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | "Business!" cried the Ghost. "Mankind was my business. The
    _`\(,_ | common welfare was my business; charity, mercy, forbearance,
    (_)/ (_) | and benevolence, were, all, my business. The dealings of my
    trade were but a drop of water in the comprehensive ocean of my
    business!" --Dickens, "A Christmas Carol"
     
  11. On 18 Aug 2005 15:04:44 -0700, [email protected] wrote:

    >
    >[email protected] wrote:
    >> bfd wrote:
    >> I should add that outside of Veloflex, Tufo, and Dugast, virtually all
    >> other tubulars available in the US are made in the Lion Tire plant in
    >> Thailand, including EVERY Vittoria model. So basically with the Yellow
    >> Jersey deal, you're getting a 220TPI Vittoria at around 17 bucks a tire.

    >
    >And to beat the other bike nerds to the punch, I'll admit that I forgot
    >high end conti's are made in Germany.


    What about Schwalbe tubulars?

    JT

    ****************************
    Remove "remove" to reply
    Visit http://www.jt10000.com
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  12. [email protected] wrote:

    > I don't think you can draw that direct a correlation between price and
    > puncture resistance. Who hasn't attributed an untimely puncture of any
    > tire to simple bad luck?


    Certainly there is a positive correlation between price and reliability
    and quality. But a correlation does not mean that you can predict
    exactly how many flats you will get or how straight the tread will be
    for every single tire you buy based on exactly how much you paid for
    it. Nor does it even mean that there will never be a type of tire that
    provides better reliability and quality for less money. It just means
    that in general there is a relationship.

    > I never had good success with Conti Sprinters. I found them hard to
    > mount, lumpy, and not particularly puncture-resistant.


    I can't say that I've had those problems, except for needing more
    effort to stretch them before mounting compared to some tires, but I
    did say that my sample size was small. They may not be as good as
    Vittoria Corsa for all I know since I have never used them that I
    remember, but compared to the cheap tires that are commonly available
    for half the price, I think they are much better in all of these
    characteristics.

    > I like Vittorias. You can buy them mail-order from Great Britain for
    > half what they retail for here in the USA. For example, ProBikeKit.com
    > sells Vittoria Corsa's for under $40 each.


    Because I don't use a bunch of tires, I use the just-in-time system for
    tire replacement- I get a flat where I need a new tire, I go buy one
    that day from a LBS that I found with good prices on that tire.

    So would you recommend the $40 Corsa over a $25 "training" tire? What
    about a $60-80 Corsa over the $25 tire?
     
  13. [email protected] wrote:

    > So would you recommend the $40 Corsa over a $25 "training" tire? What
    > about a $60-80 Corsa over the $25 tire?


    I've never paid more than $50 for a top-quality Vittoria or Veloflex
    tubular. I buy 4 or more at a time during sales and closeouts. If you
    are forced to pay $60-80 or more for the same tire at your LBS out of
    convenience, you are not shopping wisely or planning ahead.
    Until recently, I was ordering Vittoria Corsa CX's from Parker
    International in England for only $23 each. Unfortunately, they no
    longer ship goods to North America. But, you can still buy Vittoria's
    at ProBikeKit.com for under $40 each. These are their best pro racing
    tires, the same ones you pay $75 for here.
    Considering the cost of a good restaurant meal, or a tank of gas these
    days, I can justify spending $40-50 for a top-quality tire. I've also
    been using Tire Alert in Florida to repair my punctured tubulars, which
    extends their life-span significantly.
    I really can't say if low-cost "training" tubulars are worthwhile.
    Buying top-quality tires at a discount, and having them repaired as
    necessary is working out for me.
     
  14. B wrote:
    > Hello:
    >
    > I am looking for a good source for inexpensive 700C tubulars suitable
    > for training on relatively rough roads. I am a big rider (210) and would
    > prefer something more durable yet reasonably light weight.
    >
    > A Canadian source would be the best soulution, although I am open to US
    > dealer(s).
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Bruce


    $39.95 for Continental Sprinters from Bike Tires Direct. I've had
    fairly good flat resistance and durability with them. Much better than
    any clinchers I've ridden. I'm around 190 pounds.
    http://www.biketiresdirect.com/search_results.asp?cat=tt

    Many years ago I bought a bunch of Continental Sprinters for $30 each
    (including shipping) from Racer Sportif in Toronto. Give them a call.
    http://www.racersportif.com/index.htm
     
  15. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

    On Thu, 18 Aug 2005 10:17:40 -0600, B <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Hello:
    >
    >I am looking for a good source for inexpensive 700C tubulars suitable
    >for training on relatively rough roads. I am a big rider (210) and would
    >prefer something more durable yet reasonably light weight.
    >
    >A Canadian source would be the best soulution, although I am open to US
    >dealer(s).


    You might try Giro Poste in Toronto. http://www.giroposte.com

    They have a range of tubulars starting with Vittoria Formula Unos at
    $24.95(cdn).

    I haven't dealt with them in a few years but my experiences have been
    all positive. IIRC the owner is named Tim Laspa.


    jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
     
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