cheap winter gear

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by gym.gravity, Dec 13, 2005.

  1. gym.gravity

    gym.gravity Guest

    $9.99 for "wind pants" from the US's second largest discount retailer,
    known by the concentric red circles of it's logo.

    It was 19F this morning. No wind though.
     
    Tags:


  2. gym.gravity wrote:
    > $9.99 for "wind pants" from the US's second largest discount retailer,
    > known by the concentric red circles of it's logo.
    >
    > It was 19F this morning. No wind though.


    That's about what a pair of pants ought to be in my book, but then I
    haven't fully recalibrated my price expectations since the 70's.

    At 18F and 10 mph wind this morning, I was fine in just tights - and of
    course wind briefs, just in case I have a drastic reversal of my
    disinclination to breed in these next few years. Even for the "with
    wife" portion of the run, at a tube-bottom-squeezing 14 mpm pace.
    Another 10 degrees colder or 10 mph more wind and I'd add a pair of
    running pants over the tights.

    In high school, on a record-breaking cold day in the Chicago suburbs
    (wind chill around -70F) my best friend and I (not runners, pretty
    non-athletic really) got good and drunk on Jack Daniels in his family's
    sauna then ran maybe a mile in only our shorts and shoes. At least,
    the way I've been telling the story the last few decades we were
    topless, which might mean we really had on t-shirts or something, but I
    wouldn't bet against it - we were pretty bored / crazy / stoopid.
     
  3. Tom Phillips

    Tom Phillips Guest

    Charlie Pendejo wrote:
    >
    > gym.gravity wrote:
    > > $9.99 for "wind pants" from the US's second largest discount retailer,
    > > known by the concentric red circles of it's logo.
    > >
    > > It was 19F this morning. No wind though.

    >
    > That's about what a pair of pants ought to be in my book, but then I
    > haven't fully recalibrated my price expectations since the 70's.
    >
    > At 18F and 10 mph wind this morning, I was fine in just tights - and of
    > course wind briefs, just in case I have a drastic reversal of my
    > disinclination to breed in these next few years. Even for the "with
    > wife" portion of the run, at a tube-bottom-squeezing 14 mpm pace.
    > Another 10 degrees colder or 10 mph more wind and I'd add a pair of
    > running pants over the tights.
    >
    > In high school, on a record-breaking cold day in the Chicago suburbs
    > (wind chill around -70F) my best friend and I (not runners, pretty
    > non-athletic really) got good and drunk on Jack Daniels in his family's
    > sauna then ran maybe a mile in only our shorts and shoes. At least,
    > the way I've been telling the story the last few decades we were
    > topless, which might mean we really had on t-shirts or something, but I
    > wouldn't bet against it - we were pretty bored / crazy / stoopid.



    With a wind chill of (a true) minus 70 F your skin,
    especially nose, cheeks, finger tips, would freeze
    instantly....

    Might have been the booze, which as a vasodilator
    would have brought more capillary blood flow to your
    extremities. Course then your core would cool and
    hypothermia, as opposed to frostbite, would set in.
     
  4. Tom Phillips wrote:
    > With a wind chill of (a true) minus 70 F your skin,
    > especially nose, cheeks, finger tips, would freeze
    > instantly....


    Might've been only minus 60 or 65. We're talking a couple decades ago.
    More than a tad nippy, rest assured. First citation I found for
    Chicago's all-time record windchill is -93F so I believe -60 or -70 is
    the right ballpark for "remarkably cold".

    I'm living proof that a few minutes of scantily clad hard running in
    such an environment need not kill or permanently maim a man. Not that
    I'd exactly recommend it either, by any stretch.


    > Might have been the booze, which as a vasodilator
    > would have brought more capillary blood flow to your
    > extremities.


    And we were coming from a a hot sauna. OK, much less hot than a
    genuine sauna in Finland, but still considerably > 100F.

    Upon returning to the house we reckoned swallowing large quantities of
    random vitamins were in order, but my friend gagged on a handful
    vitamin C or garlic pills and puked out the back door onto his porch.
    The next morning of course that had become a little patch of ice - on
    which his sister slipped and fell, as we told the story.
     
  5. Tom Phillips

    Tom Phillips Guest

    Charlie Pendejo wrote:
    >
    > Tom Phillips wrote:
    > > With a wind chill of (a true) minus 70 F your skin,
    > > especially nose, cheeks, finger tips, would freeze
    > > instantly....

    >
    > Might've been only minus 60 or 65. We're talking a couple decades ago.
    > More than a tad nippy, rest assured. First citation I found for
    > Chicago's all-time record windchill is -93F so I believe -60 or -70 is
    > the right ballpark for "remarkably cold".


    Remarkably cold is Colorado's record low of
    an even -60 F (no wind chill.) I'm sure Dot
    will take exception to that :) Of course the
    effects of wind chill are dependent on its
    erosive effects on bare skin. Even a t-shirt
    would provide some minor temporary protection.
    Also, wind chill calculations have changed
    (google for past discussions in r.r on this
    in which I participated...) to better reflect
    the actual effects on human skin near ground
    level (before was some abstract meteorological
    calculation where skin was never actually affected.)
    Suffice it to say your -93F chill yesterday might
    be only -60F chill today. You'd need a 60 mph wind
    off Lake MI in actual -40 F temps to get a -90F
    wind chill today.

    > I'm living proof that a few minutes of scantily clad hard running in
    > such an environment need not kill or permanently maim a man.


    Only a mile/limited exposure but still a crazy stunt.
    You can die from hypothermia in temps as warm as 50 F :)
    I've had my lips turn blue and numb when running in
    temps as warm as 20 F due to wind chill. When it's
    calm lips stay warm.

    >Not that
    > I'd exactly recommend it either, by any stretch.


    Well, being Scandinavian I take little thought of
    walking outside in bare feet when it's below freezing.
    But it's relative. I've never quite indulged to the
    point of practicing sauna -> hole in the ice -> dunk
    in a frozen lake but it's really the amount of time
    and exposure you suffer. Still, frostnip occurs on
    the extremities rather quickly. More so in wind.

    > > Might have been the booze, which as a vasodilator
    > > would have brought more capillary blood flow to your
    > > extremities.

    >
    > And we were coming from a a hot sauna. OK, much less hot than a
    > genuine sauna in Finland, but still considerably > 100F.


    So, you're exposure was limited and your core
    body temp was probably overheating.

    > Upon returning to the house we reckoned swallowing large quantities of
    > random vitamins were in order, but my friend gagged on a handful
    > vitamin C or garlic pills and puked out the back door onto his porch.
    > The next morning of course that had become a little patch of ice - on
    > which his sister slipped and fell, as we told the story.


    Not sure I'd tell that part...could still get sued.
     
  6. Dot

    Dot Guest

    Tom Phillips wrote:

    >
    > Charlie Pendejo wrote:
    >
    >>Tom Phillips wrote:
    >>
    >>>With a wind chill of (a true) minus 70 F your skin,
    >>>especially nose, cheeks, finger tips, would freeze
    >>>instantly....

    >>
    >>Might've been only minus 60 or 65. We're talking a couple decades ago.
    >> More than a tad nippy, rest assured. First citation I found for
    >>Chicago's all-time record windchill is -93F so I believe -60 or -70 is
    >>the right ballpark for "remarkably cold".

    >
    >
    > Remarkably cold is Colorado's record low of
    > an even -60 F (no wind chill.) I'm sure Dot
    > will take exception to that :)


    Gosh, where ya been? I was thinking about AWOLs the other day ;)

    I believe coldest recorded in Alaska is about -80F
    http://www.usatoday.com/weather/wcstates.htm

    http://www.gi.alaska.edu/ScienceForum/ASF16/1630.html
    (Ned Rozell is an ultrarunner, I think)
    http://www.islandnet.com/~see/weather/almanac/arc2002/alm02feb.htm

    But that's a little like the strongest wind - the anemometer blows off
    of Mt. Washington, and official US weather thermometers used to only go
    to -80F. I've heard (rumor mill) they have new standard thermometers in
    some places that go below -80F now.

    I remember this cold snap - the one that resulted in more ice in Prince
    William Sound and the Exxon Valdez fiasco. I biked to work (not far)
    through most of that until it got below -25F, iirc.
    http://www.gi.alaska.edu/ScienceForum/ASF9/912.html

    Betcha Doug has some stories ;)


    Of course the
    > effects of wind chill are dependent on its
    > erosive effects on bare skin. Even a t-shirt
    > would provide some minor temporary protection.
    > Also, wind chill calculations have changed
    > (google for past discussions in r.r on this
    > in which I participated...) to better reflect
    > the actual effects on human skin near ground
    > level (before was some abstract meteorological
    > calculation where skin was never actually affected.)
    > Suffice it to say your -93F chill yesterday might
    > be only -60F chill today. You'd need a 60 mph wind
    > off Lake MI in actual -40 F temps to get a -90F
    > wind chill today.


    Here's the windchill comparisons.
    http://www.crh.noaa.gov/lsx/vortex/newwindchill.php

    Actually, where I am, when the wind blows, most of the time it warms up
    - disrupts the cold air settled on the ground. We occasionally (thank
    heaven only rarely) get winds where it gets colder. Don't remember the
    windchill on those.

    >
    >
    >>I'm living proof that a few minutes of scantily clad hard running in
    >>such an environment need not kill or permanently maim a man.


    Hmmm, Charlie, are you sure? ;)

    Dot

    --
    "You’ll never hear me say I beat the Peak. I’ve run up there pretty
    fast, and that mountain doesn’t care. I’ll never conquer the Peak." -
    Matt Carpenter
     
  7. Tom Phillips

    Tom Phillips Guest

    Dot wrote:
    >
    > Tom Phillips wrote:
    >
    > > Remarkably cold is Colorado's record low of
    > > an even -60 F (no wind chill.) I'm sure Dot
    > > will take exception to that :)

    >
    > Gosh, where ya been? I was thinking about AWOLs the other day ;)


    Ah, I have things to do. Babysitting wilderness students
    takes concentration ;) They're all from the east, you
    know ;) Plus nsg discussions take time and I'd rather
    be climbing (uh, climb now, work later...) Also have
    work to do (EA comments due xmas eve, stupid GOV) and
    not doing it...

    CO had an extended Indian summer below 9000 ft. Fri.
    after thanksgiving we climbed all day just for the
    sun tan. Climbed with a lil' gal who does fire/atmos
    studies for NCAR. More interesting than Doug's
    truncated sage wisdom -- plus cuter, smarter, and
    doesn't drink beer ;)

    > I believe coldest recorded in Alaska is about -80F
    > http://www.usatoday.com/weather/wcstates.htm


    Show off ;-) CO has the 4th lowest after AK, UT, and
    WY. Even beat MN. Was below zero here last week (winter
    finally arrived.) Highs about 0F, but calm and sunny.
    Perfect running weather. Have to check out those "Physics
    of Life at 40 below." My grandmother (2nd gen. norsky
    MN immigrant) once advised me never to sit on a toilet
    seat (er, outhouse style) when it's -40 F. Humidity ya
    know...might as well stick yo tongue to a flag pole.

    > http://www.gi.alaska.edu/ScienceForum/ASF16/1630.html


    Hey, I actually looked like that on a CMC school outing
    May 1 during a white out on St. Mary's Glacier (60mph
    [email protected],000 ft.) Nobody was running and O.K., it wasn't
    quite -81F, but my whiskers got pretty frosted.

    > (Ned Rozell is an ultrarunner, I think)
    > http://www.islandnet.com/~see/weather/almanac/arc2002/alm02feb.htm
    >
    > But that's a little like the strongest wind - the anemometer blows off
    > of Mt. Washington, and official US weather thermometers used to only go
    > to -80F. I've heard (rumor mill) they have new standard thermometers in
    > some places that go below -80F now.


    Always some place colder. Mount Washington has nothing
    on the Divide though. Strongest anemometry on Longs or
    Evans exceed 200 mph too. Lucky if Boulder is only 100
    mph. Did a climb last spring up Boulder canyon where the
    downslope was about 70 mph. But nor'easter weather has to
    be respected. A friend visited the White Mtns in October
    last year and got blown off.

    > I remember this cold snap - the one that resulted in more ice in Prince
    > William Sound and the Exxon Valdez fiasco. I biked to work (not far)
    > through most of that until it got below -25F, iirc.
    > http://www.gi.alaska.edu/ScienceForum/ASF9/912.html
    >
    > Betcha Doug has some stories ;)


    If DF is interested in a challenge, Gunnison gets
    more -25 F days than much of AK ;) Plus there's
    elevation. O.K, enough bragging. AK is cold and
    you're a steely cold runner :)

    > Of course the
    > > effects of wind chill are dependent on its
    > > erosive effects on bare skin. Even a t-shirt
    > > would provide some minor temporary protection.
    > > Also, wind chill calculations have changed
    > > (google for past discussions in r.r on this
    > > in which I participated...) to better reflect
    > > the actual effects on human skin near ground
    > > level (before was some abstract meteorological
    > > calculation where skin was never actually affected.)
    > > Suffice it to say your -93F chill yesterday might
    > > be only -60F chill today. You'd need a 60 mph wind
    > > off Lake MI in actual -40 F temps to get a -90F
    > > wind chill today.

    >
    > Here's the windchill comparisons.
    > http://www.crh.noaa.gov/lsx/vortex/newwindchill.php
    >
    > Actually, where I am, when the wind blows, most of the time it warms up
    > - disrupts the cold air settled on the ground. We occasionally (thank
    > heaven only rarely) get winds where it gets colder. Don't remember the
    > windchill on those.


    Well, must feel at home. Same happens in Front Range
    bowls, as you know..those chinooks, as we call them.

    > >>I'm living proof that a few minutes of scantily clad hard running in
    > >>such an environment need not kill or permanently maim a man.

    >
    > Hmmm, Charlie, are you sure? ;)


    ooh, a shot. A scantily clad charlie doesn't
    excite me. Not even at -93 F

    > --
    > "You’ll never hear me say I beat the Peak. I’ve run up there pretty
    > fast, and that mountain doesn’t care. I’ll never conquer the Peak." -
    > Matt Carpenter


    wise thought from an otherwise typical ridge runner?
     
  8. Doug Freese

    Doug Freese Guest

    "Dot" <[email protected]#duh?att.net> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Gosh, where ya been? I was thinking about AWOLs the other day ;)
    >
    > I believe coldest recorded in Alaska is about -80F
    > http://www.usatoday.com/weather/wcstates.htm



    I do remember it being -71F at Delta Junction but I don't remember if
    that included wind chill. I did go outside to see what it felt like and
    frankly the difference between -50 and -70 didn't feel a lot different.
    In either case going to the bathroom outside was detrimental to family
    planning. ;)

    -DougF
     
  9. Dot wrote:
    > Tom Phillips wrote:
    >> Also, wind chill calculations have changed

    >
    > Here's the windchill comparisons.
    > http://www.crh.noaa.gov/lsx/vortex/newwindchill.php


    Thanks Dot and Tom.

    I'm gonna say the weather for my little drunker teen run was, in
    hindsight, 20/20: -20F, 20mph wind. -67F on the old scale, -48F on the
    new.

    Tom, it's far more impressive to me that you, as an adult, would walk
    barefoot in sub-freezing temps. In my book "crazy teenage stunts" are
    simply part of the culture (of at least the suburban midwest) and don't
    merit any special credit; they just give us something to talk about -
    to faux brag about - in lieu of actual braggable achievements like
    finishing NYCM.


    >>> I'm living proof that a few minutes of scantily clad hard running in
    >>> such an environment need not kill or permanently maim a man.

    >
    > Hmmm, Charlie, are you sure? ;)


    All right: "...need not kill a man". ;-)


    Tom> A scantily clad charlie doesn't excite me.

    As long as a scantily clad Charlie continues to elicit shrieks of
    delight, derision, and/or disgust from the young girls of Brooklyn
    every summer, it's OK with me that you remain calm. :)
     
  10. gym.gravity

    gym.gravity Guest

    gym.gravity wrote:

    > It was 19F this morning. No wind though.


    about 7F this morning. No wind though.
     
  11. Doug Freese

    Doug Freese Guest

    "gym.gravity" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > gym.gravity wrote:
    >
    >> It was 19F this morning. No wind though.

    >
    > about 7F this morning. No wind though.


    I've been running zero with a little wind but the sun and the reflection
    off the snow is beautiful.

    -DF
     
  12. Tom Phillips

    Tom Phillips Guest

    Charlie Pendejo wrote:

    > Tom, it's far more impressive to me that you, as an adult, would walk
    > barefoot in sub-freezing temps.


    Only short term though. I'm impressed by a fellow
    climber I know who goes barefoot all winter. Never
    asked him if it's a conditioning technique but he's
    yet to get a case of frostbite on any high altitude
    climbs...

    > A scantily clad charlie doesn't excite me.
    >
    > As long as a scantily clad Charlie continues to elicit shrieks of
    > delight, derision, and/or disgust from the young girls of Brooklyn
    > every summer, it's OK with me that you remain calm. :)


    ah...but this is the first time you mentioned
    girls were involved :^)
     
  13. Brian Link

    Brian Link Guest

    On Thu, 15 Dec 2005 20:21:45 -0700, Tom Phillips <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >. I'm impressed by a fellow
    >climber I know who goes barefoot all winter.


    My neighbor has a 14" pecker.

    / ~ .\
    |\__/
    | |
    | . |
    | `.` |
    __| `` | `.` |/~~\
    / | | | `` |/~~\
    | | | | | `` | /
    \ ` . . | |
    \ . . ` /
    \ . . /
    \ . /
    | . |
    | |
    | |
     
  14. Dot

    Dot Guest

    Charlie Pendejo wrote:
    >
    >
    > Thanks Dot and Tom.
    >
    > I'm gonna say the weather for my little drunker teen run was, in
    > hindsight, 20/20: -20F, 20mph wind. -67F on the old scale, -48F on the
    > new.
    >
    > Tom, it's far more impressive to me that you, as an adult, would walk
    > barefoot in sub-freezing temps.


    If it's in snow, it's good treatment for PF. :) I mean, how's that
    different from icing the foot?

    Dot

    --
    "You’ll never hear me say I beat the Peak. I’ve run up there pretty
    fast, and that mountain doesn’t care. I’ll never conquer the Peak." -
    Matt Carpenter
     
  15. Dot

    Dot Guest

    Doug Freese wrote:

    > "gym.gravity" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>gym.gravity wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>It was 19F this morning. No wind though.

    >>
    >>about 7F this morning. No wind though.

    >
    >
    > I've been running zero with a little wind but the sun and the reflection
    > off the snow is beautiful.
    >
    > -DF
    >
    >

    Rub it in. :( About 40F and rain. Walked in parking lot. Stood with
    both feet planted on water on top of ice and let the wind blow me
    partway across lot. Yes, I tested my Stabilicers and they work much
    better than anything else I've tried.

    Dot

    --
    "You’ll never hear me say I beat the Peak. I’ve run up there pretty
    fast, and that mountain doesn’t care. I’ll never conquer the Peak." -
    Matt Carpenter
     
  16. Dot

    Dot Guest

    Tom Phillips wrote:

    >
    > Dot wrote:
    >
    >>Tom Phillips wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Remarkably cold is Colorado's record low of
    >>>an even -60 F (no wind chill.) I'm sure Dot
    >>>will take exception to that :)

    >>
    >>Gosh, where ya been? I was thinking about AWOLs the other day ;)

    >
    >
    > Ah, I have things to do. Babysitting wilderness students
    > takes concentration ;) They're all from the east, you
    > know ;)


    My sympathies ;)

    Plus nsg discussions take time and I'd rather
    > be climbing (uh, climb now, work later...)


    ditto

    Also have
    > work to do (EA comments due xmas eve, stupid GOV) and
    > not doing it...


    They're trying to keep us off balance by having too many issues and
    public comment periods at one time. They're succeeding. Most people
    can't keep track of which meeting is for which areas and which issues.
    Didn't we respond to that one already?

    >
    > CO had an extended Indian summer below 9000 ft. Fri.
    > after thanksgiving we climbed all day just for the
    > sun tan. Climbed with a lil' gal who does fire/atmos
    > studies for NCAR. More interesting than Doug's
    > truncated sage wisdom -- plus cuter, smarter, and
    > doesn't drink beer ;)


    sounds like a fun time
    >
    >
    >>I believe coldest recorded in Alaska is about -80F
    >>http://www.usatoday.com/weather/wcstates.htm

    >
    >
    > Show off ;-)


    nah, just being factual ;)


    > CO has the 4th lowest after AK, UT, and
    > WY.


    Surprisingly, it wasn't Gunnison. I've forgotten where Maybell is.


    > Even beat MN. Was below zero here last week (winter
    > finally arrived.) Highs about 0F, but calm and sunny.
    > Perfect running weather. Have to check out those "Physics
    > of Life at 40 below." My grandmother (2nd gen. norsky
    > MN immigrant) once advised me never to sit on a toilet
    > seat (er, outhouse style) when it's -40 F.


    They use styrofoam-like seats in the Brooks Range.

    >
    >
    > If DF is interested in a challenge, Gunnison gets
    > more -25 F days than much of AK ;)


    Not surprising at all. We rarely go below -20F here. And it's 40F and
    raining now. This "winter" may shape up to be much like last winter
    unless it gets its act together. :( At least we have had some subzero F
    temps already, which is more than last year. 'Course there's still a
    couple months of potentially subzero temps.


    >>Actually, where I am, when the wind blows, most of the time it warms up
    >>- disrupts the cold air settled on the ground. We occasionally (thank
    >>heaven only rarely) get winds where it gets colder. Don't remember the
    >>windchill on those.

    >
    >
    > Well, must feel at home. Same happens in Front Range
    > bowls, as you know..those chinooks, as we call them.


    The Colorado ones are more related to the airflow over the mountains
    though. At least it seemed that way. Ours are more like pressure
    differentials on two sides of pass, and it comes roaring down a valley.
    Same effect though. Those few times we get the cold winds, it gets
    really nasty. Starts near 0F, wind may pick up to 40-50mph or more, and
    temperature (not wind chill) drops another 20 deg. Fire hoses freeze up.


    >>"You’ll never hear me say I beat the Peak. I’ve run up there pretty
    >>fast, and that mountain doesn’t care. I’ll never conquer the Peak." -
    >>Matt Carpenter

    >
    >
    > wise thought from an otherwise typical ridge runner?


    He didn't do too badly this summer for an over-40 runner :)

    Dot

    --
    "You’ll never hear me say I beat the Peak. I’ve run up there pretty
    fast, and that mountain doesn’t care. I’ll never conquer the Peak." -
    Matt Carpenter
     
  17. Tom Phillips

    Tom Phillips Guest

    Dot wrote:
    >
    > Charlie Pendejo wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > > Thanks Dot and Tom.
    > >
    > > I'm gonna say the weather for my little drunker teen run was, in
    > > hindsight, 20/20: -20F, 20mph wind. -67F on the old scale, -48F on the
    > > new.
    > >
    > > Tom, it's far more impressive to me that you, as an adult, would walk
    > > barefoot in sub-freezing temps.

    >
    > If it's in snow, it's good treatment for PF. :) I mean, how's that
    > different from icing the foot?


    Not much difference, I can tell ya. Truth is it
    gets painfully cold real fast. But as long as
    you feel pain you're o.k.
     
  18. Tom Phillips

    Tom Phillips Guest

    Dot wrote:

    > >>Gosh, where ya been? I was thinking about AWOLs the other day ;)

    > >
    > >
    > > Ah, I have things to do. Babysitting wilderness students
    > > takes concentration ;) They're all from the east, you
    > > know ;)

    >
    > My sympathies ;)


    Well, some of the ladies are cute ;^) If I
    ain't climbing, I'm chasing my tail...

    > Also have
    > > work to do (EA comments due xmas eve, stupid GOV) and
    > > not doing it...

    >
    > They're trying to keep us off balance by having too many issues and
    > public comment periods at one time. They're succeeding. Most people
    > can't keep track of which meeting is for which areas and which issues.
    > Didn't we respond to that one already?


    Sounds like dubya at work. Seriously, I'm thinking
    about retiring from NEPA duty.

    snip..

    > > CO has the 4th lowest after AK, UT, and
    > > WY.

    >
    > Surprisingly, it wasn't Gunnison. I've forgotten where Maybell is.


    Northwest desert plateau. You're familiar with
    it I know...

    > > Even beat MN. Was below zero here last week (winter
    > > finally arrived.) Highs about 0F, but calm and sunny.
    > > Perfect running weather. Have to check out those "Physics
    > > of Life at 40 below." My grandmother (2nd gen. norsky
    > > MN immigrant) once advised me never to sit on a toilet
    > > seat (er, outhouse style) when it's -40 F.

    >
    > They use styrofoam-like seats in the Brooks Range.


    I'm sure if they'd had those in 1925.... But then
    no funny stories about grandma's derriere.

    > > If DF is interested in a challenge, Gunnison gets
    > > more -25 F days than much of AK ;)

    >
    > Not surprising at all. We rarely go below -20F here. And it's 40F and
    > raining now. This "winter" may shape up to be much like last winter
    > unless it gets its act together. :( At least we have had some subzero F
    > temps already, which is more than last year. 'Course there's still a
    > couple months of potentially subzero temps.


    That pesky global warming! Overall CO's warmer,
    but getting good snows in mtns. Heck, I remember
    <sigh, nostalgia> when the Front Range bowls would
    go well below zero and stay there for a good week.
    Now it's just a couple of days and maybe -5F.

    > >>Actually, where I am, when the wind blows, most of the time it warms up
    > >>- disrupts the cold air settled on the ground. We occasionally (thank
    > >>heaven only rarely) get winds where it gets colder. Don't remember the
    > >>windchill on those.

    > >
    > > Well, must feel at home. Same happens in Front Range
    > > bowls, as you know..those chinooks, as we call them.

    >
    > The Colorado ones are more related to the airflow over the mountains
    > though. At least it seemed that way. Ours are more like pressure
    > differentials on two sides of pass, and it comes roaring down a valley.
    > Same effect though.


    I was just going to say "same effect" :)

    > Those few times we get the cold winds, it gets
    > really nasty. Starts near 0F, wind may pick up to 40-50mph or more, and
    > temperature (not wind chill) drops another 20 deg. Fire hoses freeze up.


    Sounds like it might freeze my hose. Not a pleasant
    male thought... (sorry, men are ever thinking about
    their masculinity...)

    > >>"You’ll never hear me say I beat the Peak. I’ve run up there pretty
    > >>fast, and that mountain doesn’t care. I’ll never conquer the Peak." -
    > >>Matt Carpenter

    > >
    > > wise thought from an otherwise typical ridge runner?

    >
    > He didn't do too badly this summer for an over-40 runner :)


    Over 40? Is that all? ;-)
     
  19. How's your receptor problem?
    Good reception?
    Correct channel?
    Correct endpoint?
    Good underwriting?
    Good underwiring?
    Good First Aid?
     
  20. Dot

    Dot Guest

    Tom Phillips wrote:
    >
    > Dot wrote:
    >
    >>Surprisingly, it wasn't Gunnison. I've forgotten where Maybell is.

    >
    >
    > Northwest desert plateau. You're familiar with
    > it I know...


    yea, thanks. The name was familiar, and I was thinking west side, but
    couldn't remember if it was near RMNP or up in NW part of state.
    >
    >
    >
    > That pesky global warming!


    Yea, the trouble is where to move to? I understand the Icelandic low is
    still supposed to be getting colder. Hmm, maybe Iceland? ;)

    >
    >>>>"You’ll never hear me say I beat the Peak. I’ve run up there pretty
    >>>>fast, and that mountain doesn’t care. I’ll never conquer the Peak." -
    >>>>Matt Carpenter
    >>>
    >>>wise thought from an otherwise typical ridge runner?

    >>
    >>He didn't do too badly this summer for an over-40 runner :)

    >
    >
    > Over 40? Is that all? ;-)


    Yep, still a youngster by ultra standards.

    Dot

    --
    "You’ll never hear me say I beat the Peak. I’ve run up there pretty
    fast, and that mountain doesn’t care. I’ll never conquer the Peak." -
    Matt Carpenter
     
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