Cheaper workstands - any good?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Peter B, Jan 22, 2005.

  1. Peter B

    Peter B Guest

    "Jeremy Collins" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi all,
    >
    > I'm pretty fed up at leaning the bikes up against things to work on
    > them, and have been looking at workstands on Wiggle.
    >
    > Yikes, some of them are expensive, I don't really want to spend more
    > than £40.
    >
    > Can anybody share their experiences with something like this
    >
    > http://www.wiggle.co.uk/?ProductID=5360007167
    >
    > or this
    >
    > http://www.wiggle.co.uk/?ProductID=5360011766
    >
    > Can you work on the gears and drivetrain without too much hassle? Are
    > they stable enough for a tall bloke's hybrid?



    The trouble with them is that you have to bend down.
    From personal experience: I bought something similar, but cruder, to the
    ones on the links, it was better than nowt, just, then I bought a Minoura
    W300 2nd hand from an ad in the paper. What a revelation! Knowing what I
    know now I'd willingly have bought one full price, there is no comparison to
    the ones that support only the back wheel, and what if you want to remove
    the back wheel?
    I s'pose it boils down t how often you may use it and whether you have, or
    want to have back problems :)

    Pete
     
    Tags:


  2. Hi all,

    I'm pretty fed up at leaning the bikes up against things to work on
    them, and have been looking at workstands on Wiggle.

    Yikes, some of them are expensive, I don't really want to spend more
    than £40.

    Can anybody share their experiences with something like this

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/?ProductID=5360007167

    or this

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/?ProductID=5360011766

    Can you work on the gears and drivetrain without too much hassle? Are
    they stable enough for a tall bloke's hybrid?

    Cheers,

    --
    jc

    Remove the -not from email
     
  3. Peter B wrote:
    > "Jeremy Collins" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>Hi all,
    >>
    >>I'm pretty fed up at leaning the bikes up against things to work on
    >>them, and have been looking at workstands on Wiggle.
    >>
    >>Yikes, some of them are expensive, I don't really want to spend more
    >>than £40.
    >>
    >>Can anybody share their experiences with something like this
    >>
    >> http://www.wiggle.co.uk/?ProductID=5360007167
    >>
    >>or this
    >>
    >> http://www.wiggle.co.uk/?ProductID=5360011766
    >>
    >>Can you work on the gears and drivetrain without too much hassle? Are
    >>they stable enough for a tall bloke's hybrid?

    >
    >
    >
    > The trouble with them is that you have to bend down.
    > From personal experience: I bought something similar, but cruder, to the
    > ones on the links, it was better than nowt, just, then I bought a Minoura
    > W300 2nd hand from an ad in the paper. What a revelation! Knowing what I
    > know now I'd willingly have bought one full price, there is no comparison to
    > the ones that support only the back wheel, and what if you want to remove
    > the back wheel?
    > I s'pose it boils down t how often you may use it and whether you have, or
    > want to have back problems :)


    Thanks, I just wanted to know they weren't completely cr*p! I'm
    pretty used to bending over to work on the bike, so my lower
    back knows what to expect!

    Cheers,

    --
    jc

    Remove the -not from email
     
  4. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Jeremy Collins
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > Hi all,
    >
    > I'm pretty fed up at leaning the bikes up against things to work on
    > them, and have been looking at workstands on Wiggle.
    >
    > Yikes, some of them are expensive, I don't really want to spend more
    > than £40.
    >
    > Can anybody share their experiences with something like this
    >
    > http://www.wiggle.co.uk/?ProductID=5360007167
    >
    > or this
    >
    > http://www.wiggle.co.uk/?ProductID=5360011766
    >
    > Can you work on the gears and drivetrain without too much hassle? Are
    > they stable enough for a tall bloke's hybrid?


    In that price bracket, you might consider this (wall-mounting bike
    clamp):

    <URL:http://www.wiggle.co.uk/?ProductID=5360014544>

    I use one of these (Minoura W3000), which is a bit more expensive but
    has proved a wonderful buy and easily worth the money:

    <URL:http://www.wiggle.co.uk/?ProductID=5360011766>

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
    ;; Generally Not Used
    ;; Except by Middle Aged Computer Scientists
     
  5. Doki

    Doki Guest

    "Jeremy Collins" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi all,
    >
    > I'm pretty fed up at leaning the bikes up against things to work on
    > them, and have been looking at workstands on Wiggle.
    >
    > Yikes, some of them are expensive, I don't really want to spend more
    > than £40.
    >
    > Can anybody share their experiences with something like this
    >
    > http://www.wiggle.co.uk/?ProductID=5360007167
    >
    > or this
    >
    > http://www.wiggle.co.uk/?ProductID=5360011766
    >
    > Can you work on the gears and drivetrain without too much hassle? Are
    > they stable enough for a tall bloke's hybrid?


    They're OK, and I use one myself, but I'd much sooner spend a few quid more
    and gotten a proper stand that gets everything up in the air if I were
    buying a workstand again TBH.
     
  6. Arellcat

    Arellcat Guest

    Simon Brooke wrote:

    > I use [a] Minoura W3000, which is a bit more expensive but
    > has proved a wonderful buy and easily worth the money.


    From past experience, the two things that make a workstand a joy to use are
    to me a smooth running clamp that you can twirl open and closed with one
    finger, and rock-solid rotation (and then rock-solid holding) when adjusting
    the angle of the bike.

    As it happens, I'm also interested in buying (or making I expect) a
    workstand for the Windcheetah. I had a look through the stands that Wiggle
    stocks, and none of them are what I'm looking for because the main tube of
    the chassis is 50mm in diameter and none of the clamps go that big! There's
    also a stability issue since the centre of gravity would be above the clamp
    rather than far below it with a DF, and the machine weighs quite a bit as
    well.
    Anyone have any ideas before I buy some white PVC plumbing tubes and
    connectors and make the equivalent of axle stands?

    Becky
     
  7. On Sat, 22 Jan 2005 15:10:55 GMT, Jeremy Collins
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Hi all,
    >
    >I'm pretty fed up at leaning the bikes up against things to work on
    >them, and have been looking at workstands on Wiggle.


    In betwen the "lift the wheel off the ground" type and the
    "super-duper hold your bike at any angle" type are the "Hold your bike
    at waist height by supporting the bottom bracket and clamping the down
    tube" type.

    The OZZO stand was an example of this - it cost me around £30 many
    years ago. Unfortunately, Mike Dyason seems not to stock them any
    more.

    What I'm trying to say is that I'm sure you will get a more practical
    workstand for less than £40. I just don't know where from anymore!
     
  8. On Sat, 22 Jan 2005 15:10:55 GMT, Jeremy Collins
    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    <[email protected]>:

    >Can anybody share their experiences with something like this
    > http://www.wiggle.co.uk/?ProductID=5360007167
    >or this
    > http://www.wiggle.co.uk/?ProductID=5360011766
    >Can you work on the gears and drivetrain without too much hassle? Are
    >they stable enough for a tall bloke's hybrid?


    Yes, they are fine for adjusting gears etc., but not much cop for
    other work (BB etc.). I find mine invaluable for maintaining the
    'bent, which does not fit on a standard workstand, and also handy to
    keep in a corner of the kitchen for odd job son the other bikes. I
    think you will find the DX more stable.

    Guy
    --
    "then came ye chavves, theyre cartes girded wyth candels
    blue, and theyre beastes wyth straynge horn-lyke thyngs
    onn theyre arses that theyre fartes be herde from myles
    around." Chaucer, the Sheppey Tales
     
  9. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Richard Bates wrote:
    > In betwen the "lift the wheel off the ground" type and the
    > "super-duper hold your bike at any angle" type are the "Hold your bike
    > at waist height by supporting the bottom bracket and clamping the down
    > tube" type.


    I'm thinking of getting one of those (as I don't like the idea of clamping
    frame tubes, and my seatposts are usually not free). Any more comments or
    reviews on this type, folks? Are they stable enough for heavy-duty work?

    The ones that clamp the bike via front or rear forks look great except I
    wouldn't want to be rrrsed to remove a wheel for every job.

    ~PB
     
  10. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Arellcat
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > Simon Brooke wrote:
    >
    >> I use [a] Minoura W3000, which is a bit more expensive but
    >> has proved a wonderful buy and easily worth the money.

    >
    > From past experience, the two things that make a workstand a joy to
    > use are to me a smooth running clamp that you can twirl open and
    > closed with one finger, and rock-solid rotation (and then rock-solid
    > holding) when adjusting the angle of the bike.
    >
    > As it happens, I'm also interested in buying (or making I expect) a
    > workstand for the Windcheetah. I had a look through the stands that
    > Wiggle stocks, and none of them are what I'm looking for because the
    > main tube of
    > the chassis is 50mm in diameter and none of the clamps go that big!
    > There's also a stability issue since the centre of gravity would be
    > above the clamp rather than far below it with a DF, and the machine
    > weighs quite a bit as well.
    > Anyone have any ideas before I buy some white PVC plumbing tubes and
    > connectors and make the equivalent of axle stands?


    There are the workstand type clamps which bolt onto wall brackets. That
    would deal with the weight and stability issues, but you might have
    reach issues. You also need to be sure that your frame tubes will stand
    up to the crush force of the clamp jaw - my Cannondale frame's warranty
    specifically says the warranty is void if I clamp the bike anywhere but
    the seatpost.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    [ This .sig subject to change without notice ]
     
  11. Mark McNeill

    Mark McNeill Guest

    Response to Pete Biggs:
    > > In betwen the "lift the wheel off the ground" type and the
    > > "super-duper hold your bike at any angle" type are the "Hold your bike
    > > at waist height by supporting the bottom bracket and clamping the down
    > > tube" type.

    >
    > I'm thinking of getting one of those (as I don't like the idea of clamping
    > frame tubes, and my seatposts are usually not free). Any more comments or
    > reviews on this type, folks? Are they stable enough for heavy-duty work?
    >


    I've got a Tacx workstand -

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/?ProductID=5300002447

    - like that, if I've understood you & Richard correctly.


    If your gear cables run down the downtube, you'll have to be very careful
    not to trap them with the clamp, or rather what the clamp is clamping
    against. This can on occasion be a PITA.

    When performing controlled violence on the bike, you'll have to put one
    foot on the base, and be careful: a bike/stand combo flapping
    uncontrollably around in e.g. a kitchen can be destructive. DAMHIK...


    --
    Mark, UK.
    Never believe anything until it has been officially denied.
     
  12. Mark McNeill

    Mark McNeill Guest

    Response to Arellcat:
    > Anyone have any ideas before I buy some white PVC plumbing tubes and
    > connectors and make the equivalent of axle stands?
    >


    I have the AVD rear rack on mine. I'm a lazy sod, so I confess I got a
    *big* block of timber 1.5" higher than the bottom of the rack, screwed
    shelf brackets all round, and just bung it under the rack when I want to
    get the rear wheel off the ground. I was going to put some sort of
    fixing on the block to stop the rack sliding off; so far it's not been
    necessary.

    --
    Mark, UK.
    Never believe anything until it has been officially denied.
     
  13. Peter B

    Peter B Guest

    "Pete Biggs" <pwrinkledgrape{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > The ones that clamp the bike via front or rear forks look great except I
    > wouldn't want to be rrrsed to remove a wheel for every job.


    That's what I started with, a low stand which has a rest for the bottom
    bracket and a clamp for the front forks, apart from the bend-down factor
    it's fine for adjusting transmission and rear brake but little else. By
    design it rules out headset and suspension fork service, front brake
    service, and chainset and bottom bracket service are awkward with a major
    bend down & grovel factor..
    I was going to say it's a half-measure but on reflection it isn't even close
    to half.
    The Minoura stand is great, clamp a tube or seat post and everything is
    presented at the correct height, ideal for everything from cleaning to a
    complete strip-down and rebuild.
    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/ Offer a Veloman stand that looks interesting if you
    have a spare wall.

    Pete
     
  14. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Peter B wrote:
    >
    > That's what I started with, a low stand which has a rest for the bottom
    > bracket and a clamp for the front forks, apart from the bend-down factor
    > it's fine for adjusting transmission and rear brake but little else. By
    > design it rules out headset and suspension fork service, front brake
    > service, and chainset and bottom bracket service are awkward with a major
    > bend down & grovel factor..


    For real cheap, a couple of inner tubes or webbing straps looped over a
    rafter in the garage works pretty well. One goes round the saddle and
    one round the bars.

    Tony
     
  15. Callaghan

    Callaghan Guest

    On Sat, 22 Jan 2005 23:04:49 -0000, Pete Biggs wrote:
    > Richard Bates wrote:
    >> In betwen the "lift the wheel off the ground" type and the
    >> "super-duper hold your bike at any angle" type are the "Hold your bike
    >> at waist height by supporting the bottom bracket and clamping the down
    >> tube" type.

    >
    > I'm thinking of getting one of those (as I don't like the idea of clamping
    > frame tubes, and my seatposts are usually not free). Any more comments or
    > reviews on this type, folks? Are they stable enough for heavy-duty work?
    >
    > The ones that clamp the bike via front or rear forks look great except I
    > wouldn't want to be rrrsed to remove a wheel for every job.


    I bought one similar to the Tacx T3000 job, new, from SJS Cycles via eBay
    (auction) for £27.95 inc postage, some went for more, some went for less
    than that when I bought it a few months back. It goes by the name of "SJSC
    folding cycle repair stand" and is listed at £44.99 minus postage on their
    site.

    It might be worth contacting them regarding further auctions of said item.

    So far, having built up one bike, I'd say it has proved to be an excellent
    purchase. I've never owned any other type of workstand so I can't compare.
    What I can say is that on my GT Bravado, which has the two cables running
    along the downtube, is that it's a breeze to work with and doesn't foul the
    cables at all. It's solid enough and the clamp mechanism and bb cup are
    well designed, at least for my bike.

    For the price I paid I'd say it was a bargain. I also looked at the tube
    clamp swivel everywhere type but the cheapest I could find was £65-ish
    also on eBay.

    Good luck.

    --
    Callaghan
     
  16. Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:
    > On Sat, 22 Jan 2005 15:10:55 GMT, Jeremy Collins
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > <[email protected]>:
    >
    >
    >>Can anybody share their experiences with something like this
    >> http://www.wiggle.co.uk/?ProductID=5360007167
    >>or this
    >> http://www.wiggle.co.uk/?ProductID=5360011766
    >>Can you work on the gears and drivetrain without too much hassle? Are
    >>they stable enough for a tall bloke's hybrid?

    >
    >
    > Yes, they are fine for adjusting gears etc., but not much cop for
    > other work (BB etc.). I find mine invaluable for maintaining the
    > 'bent, which does not fit on a standard workstand, and also handy to
    > keep in a corner of the kitchen for odd job son the other bikes. I
    > think you will find the DX more stable.


    Thanks, I went for the DX. With the 5% discount and my £5 voucher
    it worked out at £26.34. The last time I replaced a BB was without
    any workstand at all, so it can't be worse with one!

    I fear my friends will benefit more than me anyway. I'm the only
    one with a set of decent bike tools, so with a workstand as well
    I'll probably get more requests to help them fix things!

    --
    jc

    Remove the -not from email
     
  17. Callaghan wrote:

    > I bought one similar to the Tacx T3000 job, new, from SJS Cycles via eBay
    > (auction) for £27.95 inc postage, some went for more, some went for less
    > than that when I bought it a few months back. It goes by the name of "SJSC
    > folding cycle repair stand" and is listed at £44.99 minus postage on their
    > site.
    >
    > It might be worth contacting them regarding further auctions of said item.
    >
    > So far, having built up one bike, I'd say it has proved to be an excellent
    > purchase. I've never owned any other type of workstand so I can't compare.


    Yes, if I was building up a bike I don't think I'd consider anything
    other than an upright stand with clamp.

    Fortunately / unfortunately I don't have space for any more bikes,
    so won't be doing that for a while!

    --
    jc

    Remove the -not from email
     
  18. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Mark McNeill wrote:

    > I've got a Tacx workstand -
    >
    > http://www.wiggle.co.uk/?ProductID=5300002447
    >
    > - like that, if I've understood you & Richard correctly.


    That's the bunny.

    > If your gear cables run down the downtube, you'll have to be very
    > careful not to trap them with the clamp, or rather what the clamp is
    > clamping against. This can on occasion be a PITA.
    >
    > When performing controlled violence on the bike, you'll have to put
    > one foot on the base, and be careful: a bike/stand combo flapping
    > uncontrollably around in e.g. a kitchen can be destructive. DAMHIK...


    Thanks Mark and Pete, that's enough to put me off. Now got to decide
    between the tube clamping type* and the "race" type that clamps forks. I
    don't want bike hanging from ceiling or clamped to desk in my middle room
    "office"!

    * Don't really fancy that for strangely-shaped and thin Ti tubing,
    otehrwise would be most convenient.

    ~PB
     
  19. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Simon Brooke wrote:
    > Clamp the seatpost. That's always my trick with fancy bikes. Usually
    > thicker walled than the frame tubes and if it should crush not too
    > expensive to replace.


    That's inconvenient when accessories are on the seatpost or there's not
    enough seatpost exposed. Perhaps I could risk clamping the seat tube
    afterall.

    Regarding the "race" type: One would be good for my road bike but not for
    bikes with mudguards as they get in the way, so I'm abandoning this
    option.

    There doesn't seem to be a very good solution for me, which is why I've
    never bought a stand before. Every job is possible without one (with bike
    various ways up) but bending into strange positions is not gonna be good
    for me now so I've *got* to get a stand of some sort. Either that or use
    b**e sh**s! ;-)

    ~PB
     
  20. Tom Jackson

    Tom Jackson Guest

    On Mon, 24 Jan 2005 15:40:45 -0000, "Pete Biggs" <
    >There doesn't seem to be a very good solution for me, which is why I've
    >never bought a stand before.


    Nobody has mentioned the cheaper clone version of the Minoura W500
    stand that is distributed by Spacycles. it's about 75quid. According
    to the recent C+ review it's reasonably good build quality, though I
    haven't seen one.

    http://www.spacycles.co.uk/products.php?plid=m2b0s72p120

    Worth a look at that price.

    tom.

    Disclaimer: no commercial links etc.
     
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