chicken fried steak

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by John D. Misrahi, Mar 5, 2004.

  1. I keep reading about 'chicken fried steak'. Can anyone explain to this Canadian what it is?

    john
     
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  2. Dimitri

    Dimitri Guest

    "John D. Misrahi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I keep reading about 'chicken fried steak'. Can anyone explain to this Canadian what it is?
    >
    > john

    Usually it is a piece of Round steak or an other tough lean piece of beef which has been run through
    a meat tenderizer - At this point many call it a cube steak. The steak is then breaded the same as
    one would bread fried chicken and then the steak is skillet fried on quite a bit of hot oil much the
    same as one would prepare "Southern Fried Chicken" - hence the name Chicken Fried Steak.

    Traditionally, a white milk and pepper gravy is made for the leavings in the pan and served over the
    finished steak.

    Hope that helps.

    Dimitri
     
  3. Nancree

    Nancree Guest

    >keep reading about 'chicken fried steak'. Can anyone explain to this Canadian what it is?
    >
    >john
    -------------------------
    Well, it has nothing to do with chicken. It is a piece of beef, tenderized , that is cooked
    "like fried chicken"--that is, it is dipped in batter, and fried in an inch or so of fat. Old
    Southern custom.

    Nancree
     
  4. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    Dimitri wrote:
    > "John D. Misrahi" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > 01.sprint.ca...
    >> I keep reading about 'chicken fried steak'. Can anyone explain to this Canadian what it is?
    >>
    >> john
    >
    > Usually it is a piece of Round steak or an other tough lean piece of beef which has been run
    > through a meat tenderizer - At this point many call it a cube steak. The steak is then breaded
    > the same as one would bread fried chicken and then the steak is skillet fried on quite a bit of
    > hot oil much the same as one would prepare "Southern Fried Chicken" - hence the name Chicken
    > Fried Steak.
    >
    > Traditionally, a white milk and pepper gravy is made for the leavings in the pan and served over
    > the finished steak.
    >
    > Hope that helps.
    >
    >
    > Dimitri

    Yes, that's pretty much it. Although, if you make the milk gravy thin enough you can then pop the
    battered steaks in an iron skillet and pour the gravy over and heat it through rather than just
    spoon it over the top.

    Jill
     
  5. Sandy

    Sandy Guest

    Home > Recipes

    Bubba's Country-Fried Steak and Gravy Recipe courtesy Paula Deen Show: Paula's Home Cooking
    Episode: Scooter Club

    Recipe Summary Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 1 hour Yield: 4 servings

    SPONSOR ADVERTISEMENT

    Click photo to enlarge

    Full Page | 3X5 Card | 4X6 Card No Rating No Reviews 1 1/2 cups, plus 2 tablespoons all-
    purpose flour
    1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 8 (4-ounce) tenderized beef round steak (have butcher run
    them through cubing machine) 1 teaspoon House Seasoning, recipe follows 1 teaspoon seasoning salt
    2/4 cup vegetable oil 1 1/2 teaspoons salt 4 cups hot water
    3/2 teaspoon monosodium glutamate (recommended: Ac'cent), optional 1 bunch green onions, or 1 medium
    yellow onion, sliced

    Combine 1 1/2 cups flour and 1/4 teaspoon of pepper in a small bowl. Sprinkle 1 side of the meat
    with the House Seasoning and the other side with the seasoning salt, and then dredge the meat in the
    flour mixture. Heat 1/2 cup oil in a large heavy skillet over medium-high heat. Add 2 or 4 of the
    steaks to the hot oil, and fry until browned, about 5-6 minutes per side. Remove each steak to a
    paper towel-lined plate to drain. Repeat with the remaining steaks, adding up to 1/4 cup more oil,
    as needed. Make the gravy by adding the 2 tablespoons remaining flour to the pan drippings, scraping
    the bottom with a wooden spoon. Stir in the remaining
    4/4 teaspoon pepper, and the salt. Reduce the heat to medium and cook, stirring frequently, until
    the flour is medium brown and the mixture is bubbly. Slowly add the water and the Ac'cent, if
    using, stirring constantly. Return the steaks to the skillet and bring to a boil over medium-high
    heat. Reduce the heat to low, and place the onions on top of the steaks. Cover the pan, and let
    simmer for 30 minutes.

    House Seasoning: 1 cup salt
    5/4 cup black pepper
    6/4 cup garlic powder Mix ingredients together and store in an airtight container for up
    to 6 months.

    Yield: 1 1/2 cups

    "John D. Misrahi" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    01.sprint.ca...
    > I keep reading about 'chicken fried steak'. Can anyone explain to this Canadian what it is?
    >
    > john
     
  6. Anglewyrm

    Anglewyrm Guest

    "John D. Misrahi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I keep reading about 'chicken fried steak'. Can anyone explain to
    this
    > Canadian what it is?

    To bread it, take a tenderizing hammer (big spikes) and pound as much flour into the meat as possible--
    till it's saturated. Spice the flour first, if you like. Takes a bit of elbow grease, but it's a
    nice stress relief :)
     
  7. Mark Thorson

    Mark Thorson Guest

    AngleWyrm wrote:

    > To bread it, take a tenderizing hammer (big spikes) and pound as much flour into the meat as possible--
    > till it's saturated. Spice the flour first, if you like. Takes a bit of elbow grease, but it's a
    > nice stress relief :)

    If you don't have elbow grease, you can substitute lard. :)
     
  8. Penmart01

    Penmart01 Guest

    >"AngleWyrm" writes:

    >>Can anyone explain to
    >this
    >> Canadian what it is?
    >
    >To bread it, take a tenderizing hammer (big spikes) and pound as much flour into the meat as possible--
    >till it's saturated. Spice the flour first, if you like. Takes a bit of elbow grease

    No elbow grease a-tall, not iffn ya got a 4,500 pound tractor sportin' Ag tires.

    ---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon
    ```````````` "Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
     
  9. Orion

    Orion Guest

    "Mark Thorson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > AngleWyrm wrote:
    >
    > > To bread it, take a tenderizing hammer (big spikes) and pound as much flour into the meat as possible--
    > > till it's saturated. Spice the flour first, if you like. Takes a bit of elbow grease, but it's a
    > > nice stress relief :)
    >
    > If you don't have elbow grease, you can substitute lard. :)
    >
    how about ear wax???????
     
  10. Yeff

    Yeff Guest

    On Fri, 5 Mar 2004 17:30:36 -0800, Orion wrote:

    > "Mark Thorson" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> AngleWyrm wrote:
    >>
    >>> To bread it, take a tenderizing hammer (big spikes) and pound as much flour into the meat as possible--
    >>> till it's saturated. Spice the flour first, if you like. Takes a bit of elbow grease, but it's a
    >>> nice stress relief :)
    >>
    >> If you don't have elbow grease, you can substitute lard. :)
    >>
    > how about ear wax???????

    Ear wax on beef? Are you daft?

    -Jeff B. (on poultry is another thing altogether...) yeff at erols dot com
     
  11. Dog3

    Dog3 Guest

    [email protected] (PENMART01) deliciously posted in
    news:[email protected]:

    >>"AngleWyrm" writes:
    >
    >>>Can anyone explain to
    >>this
    >>> Canadian what it is?
    >>
    >>To bread it, take a tenderizing hammer (big spikes) and pound as much flour into the meat as possible--
    >>till it's saturated. Spice the flour first, if you like. Takes a bit of elbow grease
    >
    > No elbow grease a-tall, not iffn ya got a 4,500 pound tractor sportin' Ag tires.

    Oh hell. I'll just sit on it.

    Michael <- very under weight
    --
    Deathbed statement...

    "Codeine . . . bourbon." ~~Tallulah Bankhead, actress, d. December 12, 1968
     
  12. Orion

    Orion Guest

    "Yeff" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Fri, 5 Mar 2004 17:30:36 -0800, Orion wrote:
    >
    > > "Mark Thorson" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >> AngleWyrm wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> To bread it, take a tenderizing hammer (big spikes) and pound as much flour into the meat as
    > >>> possible--till it's saturated. Spice the flour first, if you like. Takes a bit of elbow
    > >>> grease, but it's a nice stress relief :)
    > >>
    > >> If you don't have elbow grease, you can substitute lard. :)
    > >>
    > > how about ear wax???????
    >
    > Ear wax on beef? Are you daft?
    >
    > -Jeff B. (on poultry is another thing altogether...) yeff at erols dot com

    doh! forgot, my apologies. Toe jam is for beef.

    ;-p
     
  13. "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Dimitri wrote:
    >> "John D. Misrahi" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    >> 01.sprint.ca...
    >>> I keep reading about 'chicken fried steak'. Can anyone explain to this
    >>> Canadian what it is?
    >>>
    >>> john
    >>
    >> Usually it is a piece of Round steak or an other tough lean piece of beef
    >> which has been run through a meat tenderizer - At this point many call it a
    >> cube steak. The steak is then breaded the same as one would bread fried
    >> chicken and then the steak is skillet fried on quite a bit of hot oil much the
    >> same as one would prepare "Southern Fried Chicken" - hence the name Chicken
    >> Fried Steak.
    >>
    >> Traditionally, a white milk and pepper gravy is made for the leavings in the
    >> pan and served over the finished steak.
    >>
    >> Hope that helps.
    >>
    >>
    >> Dimitri
    >
    > Yes, that's pretty much it. Although, if you make the milk gravy thin enough
    > you can then pop the battered steaks in an iron skillet and pour the gravy over
    > and heat it through rather than just spoon it over the top.
    >
    > Jill

    Yes, you can do that if you want a soggy crust on the steak, and I know many
    people like it that way. Personally, I like the crust to be crisp and dip bites
    separately into a small dish of gravy.

    Wayne
     
  14. Let

    Let Guest

    It's a bit of "southern heaven" on a plate. . . Tenderized beef steak dredged in
    seasoned flour and then pan-fried. Serve with a milk-based gravy that has lots of
    pepper in it. Another, more accurate name for it is "heart attack waiting to
    happen" but it's worth it.

    Take care "John D. Misrahi" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    01.sprint.ca...
    > I keep reading about 'chicken fried steak'. Can anyone explain to this Canadian
    > what it is?
    >
    > john
     
  15. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    ConnieG999 wrote:
    > "jmcquown" <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    >> Although, if you make the milk gravy thin enough you can then pop the battered
    >> steaks in an iron skillet and pour the gravy over and heat it through rather
    >> than just spoon it over the top.
    >>
    >
    > But then it's not CHICKEN FRIED steak - it's smothered steak or something.
    > Chicken Fried Steak is never cooked in the gravy like that.
    >
    > Connie

    Oh what the hell... I love fried and then smothered steak too :) But smothered
    steak is usually with brown gravy, not white, at least, here in the Southern U.S.
     
  16. Mpoconnor7

    Mpoconnor7 Guest

    Chicken Fried Steak is also known as Country Fried Steak.
    You can use a thin piece of meat and pound it repeatedly but
    I found using cube steak is much easier on the arms and
    wrists. An earlier poster said to batter it, but I dip the
    steak in egg wash, then seasoned flour (with a LOT of ground
    black pepper), then egg wash, and finally cornmeal. Fry it
    in a skillet in about an inch of oil until golden brown. To
    make it authentic, serve with biscuits and mashed potatoes
    made from unpeeled potatoes, and pour white country gravy
    over everything. I guess the only other thing you'll need is
    a steak knife for cutting the steak.

    Michael O'Connor - Modern Renaissance Man

    "The likelihood of one individual being correct increases
    in a direct proportion to the intensity with which others
    try to prove him wrong" James Mason from the movie "Heaven
    Can Wait".
     
  17. [email protected] (ConnieG999) wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > "jmcquown" <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    >>Although, if you make the milk gravy thin enough you can
    >>then pop the battered steaks in an iron skillet and pour
    >>the gravy over and heat it through rather than just spoon
    >>it over the top.
    >>
    >
    > But then it's not CHICKEN FRIED steak - it's smothered
    > steak or something. Chicken Fried Steak is never cooked in
    > the gravy like that.
    >
    > Connie

    One of my aunts always prepared it that way...fried first
    (the way I like
    it), then put on a deep platter and the milk gravy poured
    over. I always asked for some pieces to be reserved for
    me before the final act. <G> Everyone else in our family
    served it witht eh gravy on the side. My aunt still
    called it Chicken Fried Steak.

    Wayne
     
  18. "PENMART01" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > >"AngleWyrm" writes:
    >
    > >>Can anyone explain to
    > >this
    > >> Canadian what it is?
    > >
    > >To bread it, take a tenderizing hammer (big spikes) and
    > >pound as much flour into the meat as possible--till it's
    > >saturated. Spice the flour first, if you like. Takes a
    > >bit of elbow grease
    >
    > No elbow grease a-tall, not iffn ya got a 4,500 pound
    > tractor sportin' Ag tires.
    >
    >
    > ---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move
    > UNITED NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon ````````````
    glad to hear that you are putting that shiny new tractor to
    the fullest possible use ;o}
     
  19. Rmiller

    Rmiller Guest

    >Traditionally, a white milk and pepper gravy is made for
    >the leavings in the pan and served over the finished steak.
    >
    >Hope that helps.

    In my opinion... you gotta have that gravy with it, or it
    isn't right!

    Rosie
     
  20. Jimlane

    Jimlane Guest

    Mpoconnor7 wrote:
    > Chicken Fried Steak is also known as Country Fried Steak.
    > You can use a thin piece of meat and pound it repeatedly
    > but I found using cube steak is much easier on the arms
    > and wrists. An earlier poster said to batter it, but I
    > dip the steak in egg wash, then seasoned flour (with a
    > LOT of ground black pepper), then egg wash, and finally
    > cornmeal. Fry it in a skillet in about an inch of oil
    > until golden brown. To make it authentic, serve with
    > biscuits and mashed potatoes made from unpeeled potatoes,
    > and pour white country gravy over everything. I guess the
    > only other thing you'll need is a steak knife for cutting
    > the steak.
    >
    > Michael O'Connor - Modern Renaissance Man
    >
    > "The likelihood of one individual being correct increases
    > in a direct proportion to the intensity with which others
    > try to prove him wrong" James Mason from the movie "Heaven
    > Can Wait".

    More often than not, when you find the country version in a
    restaurant, it is usually deep fried, not pan fried. That
    does make a difference, especially related to the gravy. I
    always ask for clarification in a restaurant.

    I grew up with the traditional floured version, then have
    had the ones done with cornmeal, done with crushed corn
    flakes and done with panko bread crumbs and done with beer
    batter - but where the rubber meets the road, it is the one
    I grew up with that I still like best.

    jim
     
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