Chicken Paprika--from my Hungarian Dad, '56 revolution

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Scapaflow, Jan 26, 2004.

  1. Scapaflow

    Scapaflow Guest

    [I post this on occasion hoping that someone will try it. I prepared it for the extended family for
    2003 Christmas and my professional-chef bro-in-law said it was the best meal he's had in a year. My
    Dad came to the states via Austria during the 1956 revolution.]
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Chicken Paprika

    This is a recipe for Chicken Paprika, a recipe my father brought over from hungary. It is simply
    marvelous. (It bears no relationship to Cacciatore. Resist adding peppers, onion, etc.)

    (This recipe produces 6 or more servings.)

    Sauce Ingredients: 1 whole chicken + 6 chicken thighs 1 pint sour cream ( Don't use no-fat or low-
    fat versions, as this is not a meal for dieters, but an occasional, sinful treat.)
    1/2-1 pint whole milk (No skim or low-fat) 2 heaping Tbsp Paprika (Again, the best you can
    find. I use "Budapest's Best"--Sweet Delicate Hungarian Paprika.) 1 heaping tsp salt, salt to
    taste Water 1 Tbsp chicken base (paste type, the best you can find. Bouillon cubes work, but
    are not as good.)

    Noodle Ingredients: 1 level cup unsifted, unbleached white flour 1 level tsp salt 1 egg water

    Sauce procedure:
    2) Cut whole chicken into it's constituent parts (breasts, thigh, back, etc.) and remove skin.

    3) Trim fat deposits and rinse all chicken thoroughly

    4) This step is critical. Cut all chicken pieces in half, including thighs. I use a cleaver . This
    exposes the crucial bone marrow. The more marrow you expose, the better the sauce. I chop the
    wings into 4 or five pieces. Do not add giblets and neck.

    5) In large pot, combine chicken, salt, Paprika, chicken base, and enough water to just cover the
    chicken pieces. Cook, partially covered, at such temperature that a simmer to very gentle boil
    is achieved. You want just a bit of bubbling. Do so until the chicken is thoroughly cooked and
    easily removed from the bone--About 1.5 hrs. (I cook the chicken until it is on the verge of
    falling off the bone. This extracts maximum flavor from the chicken.)

    6) Strain mixture to separate broth and chicken. Place chicken into a warm serving dish. Return
    broth to pot and place on medium heat.

    7) In a mixing bowl, combine enough milk to sour cream to render a mixture that is pourable. The
    consistency is roughly that of very thick pancake batter and requires a sour cream / milk
    ratio of about
    7:1. If you use a pint of sour cream, you'll use about 1/2 pint milk, maybe a bit more.

    8) Vigorously mix sour cream and milk mixture into broth. I use a whisk for this. Carefully bring
    the sauce to a boil and remove immediately from heat (see note at end). Failure to remove
    promptly will result in very messy boiling over! Set burner to it's lowest setting and return
    pot to the burner to keep sauce hot. The sauce is basically finished at this point. You may wish
    to fine tune by adding more salt, sour cream, Paprika, and/or chicken base. I sometimes add a
    1/2 cup or so of heavy cream for added richness. You may also want to skim most of the liquid
    fat from the sauce surface, though I do not. The sauce may separate in which case I use hand
    blender to re-incorporate.

    Noodles procedure:
    9) Combine flour, salt, and eggs in a hemispherical bowl large enough to accommodate mixing.

    10) Add about 1/2 cup water and proceed to blend ingredients with a fork until well blended. The
    consistency you're striving for is such that the dough is clearly wet, adheres to the bowl, and
    is loose enough to slowly spread out when a dollop is applied to the cutting board. Add enough
    water to achieve this. I've never measured how much water I use, but think it's about 1/2 cup
    plus some. Actually, the consistency is not critical. I'm guessing you've made noodles (or
    dumplings) like this, and that additional, excruciating explanation is not necessary.

    11) Set a dutch oven (good size pot) 2/3 full of water to boil.

    12) At this point, obviously the dough goes into the water. I place a good size dollop on a small
    cutting board and use a gently curved, sharp knife to cut perhaps 3/4" size blobs which are then
    vigorously swept off the board into the boiling water. They are done when they float to the
    surface. A perforated spoon is used to remove the noodles from the water which are placed in a
    warm serving bowl. I cut perhaps 3-4 dozen noodles, let them cook (very quick), remove, and
    proceed to add the next 3-4 dozen until all of the dough is consumed. If it looks like boiling
    over is about to occur, add some cold water.

    At this point you should have a pot of wonderful sauce, a bowl full of chicken pieces, and a bowl
    of noodles. For serving, place a good serving of noodles and half (maybe less) as much chicken into
    a flat bowl. Apply enough sauce to almost cover noodles and chicken. You may want to salt to taste.
    My wife likes pepper on it. I do not. In any case, Viola!

    That's it. I really want you to try this, as everyone on both sides of our family loves it. My
    instructions are laborious because attention paid to various details will produce a superb dish,
    while an average effort with average ingredients produce a result that is only very good.

    Dave
    --------------
    Note: You may want to only add a portion of the sour cream / milk at a time, testing as you go for
    taste. We tend to like a lot of sour cream flavor, but you may desire less. In any case, the
    resultant should be rich and satisfying, but not overwhelmed with sour cream. Also, there may
    be some question about bringing the sauce to a boil. It is not necessary, but imparts more
    complexity to the sauce. Most premium sour cream brands will not separate, but if some
    separation occurs, no matter--use a hand blender or whisk. Finally, I hope the apparent
    complexity of this dish doesn't scare you off. It's one of those dishes that is made with the
    gut, and is therefore difficult to quantify in a way that permits precise description in
    recipe form. I sometimes use half and half instead of whole milk for added richness.
     
    Tags:


  2. Ferrante

    Ferrante Guest

    Thank you so much! I will certainly try this!

    Mark Ferrante

    On Tue, 27 Jan 2004 00:55:59 -0500, Scapaflow <[email protected]> wrote:

    >[I post this on occasion hoping that someone will try it. I prepared it for the extended family for
    >2003 Christmas and my professional-chef bro-in-law said it was the best meal he's had in a year. My
    >Dad came to the states via Austria during the 1956 revolution.]
    >-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    >
    >
    >Chicken Paprika
    >
    >This is a recipe for Chicken Paprika, a recipe my father brought over from hungary. It is simply
    >marvelous. (It bears no relationship to Cacciatore. Resist adding peppers, onion, etc.)
    >
    >(This recipe produces 6 or more servings.)
    >
    >Sauce Ingredients: 1 whole chicken + 6 chicken thighs 1 pint sour cream ( Don't use no-fat or low-
    >fat versions, as this is not a meal for dieters, but an occasional, sinful treat.)
    > 1/2-1 pint whole milk (No skim or low-fat) 2 heaping Tbsp Paprika (Again, the best you can find.
    > I use "Budapest's Best"--Sweet Delicate Hungarian Paprika.) 1 heaping tsp salt, salt to taste
    > Water 1 Tbsp chicken base (paste type, the best you can find. Bouillon cubes work, but are not
    > as good.)
    >
    >Noodle Ingredients: 1 level cup unsifted, unbleached white flour 1 level tsp salt 1 egg water
    >
    >Sauce procedure:
    >1) Cut whole chicken into it's constituent parts (breasts, thigh, back, etc.) and remove skin.
    >
    >2) Trim fat deposits and rinse all chicken thoroughly
    >
    >3) This step is critical. Cut all chicken pieces in half, including thighs. I use a cleaver . This
    > exposes the crucial bone marrow. The more marrow you expose, the better the sauce. I chop the
    > wings into 4 or five pieces. Do not add giblets and neck.
    >
    >4) In large pot, combine chicken, salt, Paprika, chicken base, and enough water to just cover the
    > chicken pieces. Cook, partially covered, at such temperature that a simmer to very gentle boil
    > is achieved. You want just a bit of bubbling. Do so until the chicken is thoroughly cooked and
    > easily removed from the bone--About 1.5 hrs. (I cook the chicken until it is on the verge of
    > falling off the bone. This extracts maximum flavor from the chicken.)
    >
    >5) Strain mixture to separate broth and chicken. Place chicken into a warm serving dish. Return
    > broth to pot and place on medium heat.
    >
    >6) In a mixing bowl, combine enough milk to sour cream to render a mixture that is pourable. The
    > consistency is roughly that of very thick pancake batter and requires a sour cream / milk ratio
    > of about
    >2:1. If you use a pint of sour cream, you'll use about 1/2 pint milk, maybe a bit more.
    >
    >7) Vigorously mix sour cream and milk mixture into broth. I use a whisk for this. Carefully bring
    > the sauce to a boil and remove immediately from heat (see note at end). Failure to remove
    > promptly will result in very messy boiling over! Set burner to it's lowest setting and return
    > pot to the burner to keep sauce hot. The sauce is basically finished at this point. You may wish
    > to fine tune by adding more salt, sour cream, Paprika, and/or chicken base. I sometimes add a
    > 1/2 cup or so of heavy cream for added richness. You may also want to skim most of the liquid
    > fat from the sauce surface, though I do not. The sauce may separate in which case I use hand
    > blender to re-incorporate.
    >
    >Noodles procedure:
    >1) Combine flour, salt, and eggs in a hemispherical bowl large enough to accommodate mixing.
    >
    >2) Add about 1/2 cup water and proceed to blend ingredients with a fork until well blended. The
    > consistency you're striving for is such that the dough is clearly wet, adheres to the bowl, and
    > is loose enough to slowly spread out when a dollop is applied to the cutting board. Add enough
    > water to achieve this. I've never measured how much water I use, but think it's about 1/2 cup
    > plus some. Actually, the consistency is not critical. I'm guessing you've made noodles (or
    > dumplings) like this, and that additional, excruciating explanation is not necessary.
    >
    >3) Set a dutch oven (good size pot) 2/3 full of water to boil.
    >
    >4) At this point, obviously the dough goes into the water. I place a good size dollop on a small
    > cutting board and use a gently curved, sharp knife to cut perhaps 3/4" size blobs which are then
    > vigorously swept off the board into the boiling water. They are done when they float to the
    > surface. A perforated spoon is used to remove the noodles from the water which are placed in a
    > warm serving bowl. I cut perhaps 3-4 dozen noodles, let them cook (very quick), remove, and
    > proceed to add the next 3-4 dozen until all of the dough is consumed. If it looks like boiling
    > over is about to occur, add some cold water.
    >
    > At this point you should have a pot of wonderful sauce, a bowl full of chicken pieces, and a bowl
    > of noodles. For serving, place a good serving of noodles and half (maybe less) as much chicken
    > into a flat bowl. Apply enough sauce to almost cover noodles and chicken. You may want to salt to
    > taste. My wife likes pepper on it. I do not. In any case, Viola!
    >
    > That's it. I really want you to try this, as everyone on both sides of our family loves it. My
    > instructions are laborious because attention paid to various details will produce a superb dish,
    > while an average effort with average ingredients produce a result that is only very good.
    >
    >Dave
    >--------------
    >Note: You may want to only add a portion of the sour cream / milk at a time, testing as you go for
    > taste. We tend to like a lot of sour cream flavor, but you may desire less. In any case, the
    > resultant should be rich and satisfying, but not overwhelmed with sour cream. Also, there may
    > be some question about bringing the sauce to a boil. It is not necessary, but imparts more
    > complexity to the sauce. Most premium sour cream brands will not separate, but if some
    > separation occurs, no matter--use a hand blender or whisk. Finally, I hope the apparent
    > complexity of this dish doesn't scare you off. It's one of those dishes that is made with the
    > gut, and is therefore difficult to quantify in a way that permits precise description in
    > recipe form. I sometimes use half and half instead of whole milk for added richness.
    >
     
  3. Sf

    Sf Guest

    I've bought both Hungarian Sweet Paprika and Hungarian Hot Paprika... the sweet is very good and
    although I love hot pepper, the Hungarian Hot is HOT! What kind of peppers do they use for that
    stuff? You have to be VERY, very careful with it. I've never had anything close to that sort of
    experience with even the hottest (the claim on the package) of dried & ground chilis I find on my
    store shelves.... and I'm in an area that should have the hot stuff.

    Practice safe eating - always use condiments
     
  4. Laura

    Laura Guest

    I got some hot paprika a few months ago...and regular paprika also (for my version of paprikash or
    however that would be spelled..sorry). Bought the hot more out of curiosity last summer at penzy's.
    What would I use it in though?!! ideas needed..
    --

    Laura

    "sf" <[email protected]ne.com> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > I've bought both Hungarian Sweet Paprika and Hungarian Hot
    > Paprika... the sweet is very good and although I love hot pepper, the Hungarian Hot is HOT! What
    > kind of peppers do they use for that stuff? You have to be VERY, very careful with it. I've
    > never had anything close to that sort of experience with even the hottest (the claim on the
    > package) of dried & ground chilis I find on my store shelves.... and I'm in an area that should
    > have the hot stuff.
    >
    >
    > Practice safe eating - always use condiments
     
  5. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    Laura wrote:
    >
    > I got some hot paprika a few months ago...and regular paprika also (for my version of paprikash or
    > however that would be spelled..sorry). Bought the hot more out of curiosity last summer at
    > penzy's. What would I use it in though?!! ideas needed.

    I put cayenne in my macaroni and cheese, I find I like it better when it has a bite to it. I think
    hot paprika would do great in an application like that.

    nancy
     
  6. Dan Abel

    Dan Abel Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    wrote:

    > Laura wrote:
    > >
    > > I got some hot paprika a few months ago...and regular paprika also (for my version of paprikash
    > > or however that would be spelled..sorry). Bought the hot more out of curiosity last summer at
    > > penzy's. What would I use it in though?!! ideas needed.
    >
    > I put cayenne in my macaroni and cheese, I find I like it better when it has a bite to it. I think
    > hot paprika would do great in an application like that.

    Paprika, dried red pepper and chile powder are all the same thing, with different varieties of dried
    red pepper. They can be interchanged, depending on desired heat level, although the flavors of
    different chiles are slightly different. Chili powder (note spelling difference) is chile powder
    with other spices added. You can use hot paprika anywhere you can use the mild. Also, read your
    label. Penzey's usually gives suggestions for use.

    --
    Dan Abel Sonoma State University AIS [email protected]
     
  7. On Wed, 28 Jan 2004 22:15:44 GMT, Laura <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I got some hot paprika a few months ago...and regular paprika also (for my version of paprikash or
    > however that would be spelled..sorry). Bought the hot more out of curiosity last summer at
    > penzy's. What would I use it in though?!! ideas needed..

    We use it everyplace regular paprika is called for, although we might go a littl easier
    depending on the amount. It adds a nice zing to deviled eggs. :)

    Ariane
     
  8. "Laura" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > I got some hot paprika a few months ago...and regular paprika also (for my version of paprikash or
    > however that would be spelled..sorry). Bought the hot more out of curiosity last summer at
    > penzy's. What would I use it in though?!! ideas needed..

    I always add paprika to my chili recipe along with the usual chili powder and other seasonings. I
    get the hot paprika would be especially good.

    It would probably be a good addition to beef goulash, since beef is sturdy enough to stand the heat.

    Wayne
     
  9. "Laura" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I got some hot paprika a few months ago...and regular paprika also (for my version of paprikash or
    > however that would be spelled..sorry). Bought the hot more out of curiosity last summer at
    > penzy's. What would I use it in though?!! ideas needed..
    > --
    >
    > Laura
    >
    >

    Use it where you'd normally use the regular, for a bit of oomph. The hot paprika that I've tried is
    hardly in the same neighborhood as cayenne or even ground chipotle.

    Jack Scoville
     
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