Chicken soup variations

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Julia Altshuler, Feb 11, 2005.

  1. I started with a resolution to try new recipes. Then Jim got sick with
    an ordinary head and chest cold. This calls for chicken soup. The
    first experiment was with Vietnamese style soup. I didn't follow an
    exact recipe, but we roasted a duck the first day (just before he got
    sick), ate the drumsticks, then threw the carcass including the breasts
    into the stock pot the second day. When all was soupy (4 hours?), we
    removed the bones, cut up the breast meat and served it at the table
    with a side of: lime quarters, chopped cilantro, grated ginger, chopped
    scallions and a little garlic. Wonderful. It was so good, in fact,
    that I'm thinking of skipping the first day and proceeding straight to
    the second. Roast duck isn't nearly so good as duck soup.


    Yesterday Jim's symptoms were in full swing so I headed out to the
    supermarket for supplies and bought 2 roaster chickens at .99/#. Jim
    hacked them up, reserved the drumsticks and breast and threw the rest in
    the stock pot. He kept drinking the broth all day. For dinner, we
    strained the stock. I then made some of it into a recipe from the
    Silver Palate New Times cookbook. I discovered that I didn't have pine
    nuts (was sure I always had them in the house) and wanted it to have
    more vegetables so I fiddled with the recipe a little (part of the
    resolution was not to do that), but basically it is chicken stock,
    chopped breast meat, (onions, carrots and celery that the recipe doesn't
    call for), marsala, cream and saffron. I don't know when I've tasted
    such a wonderful combination of flavors. Having the chicken stock on
    hand is a pain in the neck (it seems like every pot in the house got
    used and greasy), but if there's stock in the freezer, the soup goes
    together very quickly.


    --Lia
     
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  2. Dave W.

    Dave W. Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Julia Altshuler <[email protected]> wrote:

    >.....but basically it is chicken stock,
    > chopped breast meat, (onions, carrots and celery that the recipe doesn't
    > call for), marsala, cream and saffron.


    I've got a chicken (or most of a chicken) simmering with carrots, onion,
    and celery down in the kitchen. So what is "marsala?" Is it that
    curry-like concoction (garam marsala?) that I've had on the shelf down
    there for so long that it is probably completely tasteless?

    Regards,
    Dave W.

    --
    Living in the Ozarks
    For email, edu will do.

    During times of universal deceit, telling the truth
    becomes a revolutionary act. - George Orwell, (1903-1950)
     
  3. Steve Calvin

    Steve Calvin Guest

    Dave W. wrote:
    <snip>

    So what is "marsala?" Is it that
    > curry-like concoction (garam marsala?) that I've had on the shelf down
    > there for so long that it is probably completely tasteless?
    >
    > Regards,
    > Dave W.
    >


    http://www.champagneswines.com/wine/marsala.htm

    --
    Steve

    Every job is a self-portrait of the person who did it.
    Autograph your work with excellence.
     
  4. Dave W. wrote:

    > I've got a chicken (or most of a chicken) simmering with carrots, onion,
    > and celery down in the kitchen. So what is "marsala?" Is it that
    > curry-like concoction (garam marsala?) that I've had on the shelf down
    > there for so long that it is probably completely tasteless?



    I got up to check the bottle for spelling. Marsala is a sweet aromatic
    wine with flavors of raisins, prunes and figs. Look for it in the
    dessert wine section of the wine store. My recipe called for half a cup
    in 6 cups of chicken stock.

    --Lia
     
  5. Hahabogus

    Hahabogus Guest

    Julia Altshuler <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Dave W. wrote:
    >
    > > I've got a chicken (or most of a chicken) simmering with carrots,
    > > onion, and celery down in the kitchen. So what is "marsala?" Is it
    > > that curry-like concoction (garam marsala?) that I've had on the
    > > shelf down there for so long that it is probably completely
    > > tasteless?

    >
    >
    > I got up to check the bottle for spelling. Marsala is a sweet
    > aromatic wine with flavors of raisins, prunes and figs. Look for it
    > in the dessert wine section of the wine store. My recipe called for
    > half a cup in 6 cups of chicken stock.
    >
    > --Lia
    >
    >


    sherry works well too. I prefer marsalla in a cake.

    --
    No Bread Crumbs were hurt in the making of this Meal.
    Type 2 Diabetic 1AC 5.6mmol or 101mg/dl
    Continuing to be Manitoban
     
  6. aem

    aem Guest

    Hahabogus wrote:
    >
    > sherry works well too. I prefer marsalla in a cake.
    >

    I like a touch of sherry in chicken stock, too. Marsala also works
    really well for flavoring sauteed mushrooms that become a sauce topping
    for pork chops.

    -aem
     
  7. Vox Humana

    Vox Humana Guest

    "Julia Altshuler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Dave W. wrote:
    >
    > > I've got a chicken (or most of a chicken) simmering with carrots, onion,
    > > and celery down in the kitchen. So what is "marsala?" Is it that
    > > curry-like concoction (garam marsala?) that I've had on the shelf down
    > > there for so long that it is probably completely tasteless?

    >
    >
    > I got up to check the bottle for spelling. Marsala is a sweet aromatic
    > wine with flavors of raisins, prunes and figs. Look for it in the
    > dessert wine section of the wine store. My recipe called for half a cup
    > in 6 cups of chicken stock.
    >


    Marsala comes in both sweet and dry versions. Dry Marsala is used when
    making chicken Marsala.
    http://recipes.lidiasitaly.com/ProductDetails.aspx?productID=494
     
  8. Vox Humana wrote:

    > Marsala comes in both sweet and dry versions. Dry Marsala is used when
    > making chicken Marsala.



    I took the note about Marsala being sweet from the bottle I used in
    making the soup last night, but, come to think of it, the recipe said
    just to use Marsala and didn't mention dry or sweet varieties. With
    that in mind, anyone is free to use whatever sort of Marsala or sherry
    they like, but I'm recommending sweet Marsala because that's what I
    tried and loved.


    --Lia
     
  9. Dave W.

    Dave W. Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Julia Altshuler <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Dave W. wrote:
    >
    > > I've got a chicken (or most of a chicken) simmering with carrots, onion,
    > > and celery down in the kitchen. So what is "marsala?" Is it that
    > > curry-like concoction (garam marsala?) that I've had on the shelf down
    > > there for so long that it is probably completely tasteless?

    >
    >
    > I got up to check the bottle for spelling. Marsala is a sweet aromatic
    > wine with flavors of raisins, prunes and figs. Look for it in the
    > dessert wine section of the wine store. My recipe called for half a cup
    > in 6 cups of chicken stock.
    >
    > --Lia


    Aha! Thanks. My wife suggested it was wine. I'm heading up the pike to
    Missouri tomorrow to do some wine and beer shopping. I added Marsala to
    the list .... perhaps I'll get both sweet and (following Vox Humana's
    suggestion) dry varieties.

    Thanks again!

    Dave W.

    --
    Living in the Ozarks
    For email, edu will do.

    During times of universal deceit, telling the truth
    becomes a revolutionary act. - George Orwell, (1903-1950)
     
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