chicken thighs, vidalia onions.... hmmmm?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by rmg, Jul 1, 2005.

  1. rmg

    rmg Guest

    Someone just gave me three huge Costco Vidalia onions. There's only one of
    me, but I figure I can do a good job polishing them off. I have four chicken
    thighs in the fridge and I was thinking of cooking a whole onion with the
    thighs. I have virtually every kind of spice on hand... does anyone have any
    suggestions for a process for this? Thanks for your cosideration :)

    ------------------------------------------------------
    rox
     
    Tags:


  2. tsr3

    tsr3 Guest

    Make a small hole in the top of the onion and put a beef bullion cube
    in it. Fill the rest of hole with butter. Wrap onion in foil, and
    bake at 350--375 for about an hour. (Or you can cook the onion foil
    pack on the grill).

    When done, onion will just fall apart.....yum!
    ========================================
    Another idea:
    Also, cut onions into large chunks, and put on skewer (along with other
    veggies, like green/red bell pepper, mushrooms, squash, roma tomatos,
    etc. Grill until done. Onions are just wonderful grilled.
    ========================================
    Another idea: quarter onions, and put in crock pot along with a chuck
    roast, carrots, tomato soup, can of beer and packet of taco seasoning
    (or your own seasoning). Cook on low for about 8 hours--onions are the
    best part of this dish, in my opinion.
     
  3. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "rmg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Someone just gave me three huge Costco Vidalia onions. There's only one of
    > me, but I figure I can do a good job polishing them off. I have four
    > chicken
    > thighs in the fridge and I was thinking of cooking a whole onion with the
    > thighs. I have virtually every kind of spice on hand... does anyone have
    > any
    > suggestions for a process for this? Thanks for your cosideration :)
    >
    > ------------------------------------------------------
    > rox
    >
    >


    Cooking a vidalia is a waste. Vidalias are sweet because they are low in the
    chemicals that make regular onions strong and "teary." Cooking destroys
    these chemicals, so a regular onion will taste the same as a vidalia.


    --
    Peter Aitken
    Visit my recipe and kitchen myths page at www.pgacon.com/cooking.htm
     
  4. kilikini

    kilikini Guest

    "rmg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:04hxe.1654$j04.1363[email protected]
    > Someone just gave me three huge Costco Vidalia onions. There's only one of
    > me, but I figure I can do a good job polishing them off. I have four

    chicken
    > thighs in the fridge and I was thinking of cooking a whole onion with the
    > thighs. I have virtually every kind of spice on hand... does anyone have

    any
    > suggestions for a process for this? Thanks for your cosideration :)
    >
    > ------------------------------------------------------
    > rox
    >
    >


    Got tortillas? Got any bell peppers? I'd say chicken "fajitas". (Yes, I
    know it's a cut of meat...not a style of dish. We Americans have
    bastardized the term, but go with me here.)

    kili
     
  5. AlleyGator

    AlleyGator Guest

    "rmg" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Someone just gave me three huge Costco Vidalia onions. There's only one of
    >me, but I figure I can do a good job polishing them off. I have four chicken
    >thighs in the fridge and I was thinking of cooking a whole onion with the
    >thighs. I have virtually every kind of spice on hand... does anyone have any
    >suggestions for a process for this? Thanks for your cosideration :)
    >
    >------------------------------------------------------
    >rox
    >
    >

    Even though I'm not allowed to eat it anymore, I would cook the
    chicken however you like it and make onion rings out of the Vidalias.
    Good stuff! So far around here, all we have are Walla-walla's. Not
    bad, but not a Vidalia.

    --
    The Doc says my brain waves closely match those of a crazed ferret.
    At least now I have an excuse.
     
  6. rmg

    rmg Guest

    "Peter Aitken" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "rmg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Someone just gave me three huge Costco Vidalia onions. There's only one

    of
    > > me, but I figure I can do a good job polishing them off. I have four
    > > chicken
    > > thighs in the fridge and I was thinking of cooking a whole onion with

    the
    > > thighs. I have virtually every kind of spice on hand... does anyone have
    > > any
    > > suggestions for a process for this? Thanks for your cosideration :)
    > >
    > > ------------------------------------------------------
    > > rox
    > >
    > >

    >
    > Cooking a vidalia is a waste.


    Hmm, chicken salad then?
     
  7. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "AlleyGator" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "rmg" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Someone just gave me three huge Costco Vidalia onions. There's only one of
    >>me, but I figure I can do a good job polishing them off. I have four
    >>chicken
    >>thighs in the fridge and I was thinking of cooking a whole onion with the
    >>thighs. I have virtually every kind of spice on hand... does anyone have
    >>any
    >>suggestions for a process for this? Thanks for your cosideration :)
    >>
    >>------------------------------------------------------
    >>rox
    >>
    >>

    > Even though I'm not allowed to eat it anymore, I would cook the
    > chicken however you like it and make onion rings out of the Vidalias.
    > Good stuff! So far around here, all we have are Walla-walla's. Not
    > bad, but not a Vidalia.
    >

    I've not been able to discern the difference between any sweet onions;
    vidalias, walla-wallas, Maui onions, the Peruvian onions. However, I don't
    mind spending my money at Costco on any of these sweet onions, because for
    me I can tell the difference (when cooked) between any of the sweet onions
    and the usual yellow/white/red onions.
    Dee
     
  8. gjgee

    gjgee Guest

    Season the thighs with salt, pepper, and a little thyme and garlic
    powder. Dredge in flour. Pan fry on both sides until almost done.
    Remove. Slice onions, and pan fry in same pan with olive oil and
    butter. Add salt, pepper, a bay leaf, nutmeg and a little brown sugar.
    When slightly translucent, add a bit of balsamic vinegar and chicken
    stock or water. Scrape up browned bits. Add the chicken back to the pan
    and cover. Cook until chicken is done. Serve over rice or buttered
    noodles. If you have mushrooms, those would be good in there too!

    AlleyGator wrote:
    > "rmg" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Someone just gave me three huge Costco Vidalia onions. There's only one of
    > >me, but I figure I can do a good job polishing them off. I have four chicken
    > >thighs in the fridge and I was thinking of cooking a whole onion with the
    > >thighs. I have virtually every kind of spice on hand... does anyone have any
    > >suggestions for a process for this? Thanks for your cosideration :)
    > >
    > >------------------------------------------------------
    > >rox
    > >
    > >

    > Even though I'm not allowed to eat it anymore, I would cook the
    > chicken however you like it and make onion rings out of the Vidalias.
    > Good stuff! So far around here, all we have are Walla-walla's. Not
    > bad, but not a Vidalia.
    >
    > --
    > The Doc says my brain waves closely match those of a crazed ferret.
    > At least now I have an excuse.
     
  9. Dee Randall wrote:
    > "AlleyGator" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>"rmg" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Someone just gave me three huge Costco Vidalia onions. There's only one of
    >>>me, but I figure I can do a good job polishing them off. I have four
    >>>chicken
    >>>thighs in the fridge and I was thinking of cooking a whole onion with the
    >>>thighs. I have virtually every kind of spice on hand... does anyone have
    >>>any
    >>>suggestions for a process for this? Thanks for your cosideration :)
    >>>
    >>>------------------------------------------------------
    >>>rox
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>Even though I'm not allowed to eat it anymore, I would cook the
    >>chicken however you like it and make onion rings out of the Vidalias.
    >>Good stuff! So far around here, all we have are Walla-walla's. Not
    >>bad, but not a Vidalia.
    >>

    >
    > I've not been able to discern the difference between any sweet onions;
    > vidalias, walla-wallas, Maui onions, the Peruvian onions. However, I don't
    > mind spending my money at Costco on any of these sweet onions, because for
    > me I can tell the difference (when cooked) between any of the sweet onions
    > and the usual yellow/white/red onions.


    I'm hard pressed to believe that. The difference between "sweet" onions
    and white or yellow conventional onions is what they have that the
    others don't, it's what they lack. Sweets are missing the compounds that
    make the others sharp and pungent. When using conventional onions, those
    compounds are converted to other things or eliminated in the process of
    cooking and simply disappear from the flavor profile. Sweets are no
    sweeter than any other onion.

    Pastorio
     
  10. gjgee

    gjgee Guest

  11. "gjgee" <[email protected]> writes:

    >Season the thighs with salt, pepper, and a little thyme and garlic
    >powder. Dredge in flour. Pan fry on both sides until almost done.
    >Remove. Slice onions, and pan fry in same pan with olive oil and

    [snip]

    This sounds wonderful. I'm going to have to try it soon, thanks!

    Stacia
     
  12. Dan Abel

    Dan Abel Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "Dee Randall"
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    > I've not been able to discern the difference between any sweet onions;
    > vidalias, walla-wallas, Maui onions, the Peruvian onions.


    The difference is that they don't ship or keep as well as regular onions,
    so you are better off buying them where they are grown:

    Walla Walla onions are grown in Walla Walla, Washington
    Vidalia onions are grown in Georgia
    Maui onions are grown on Maui in Hawaii
    I'm not familiar with Peruvian onions, but I assume that they are grown in Peru


    :)

    --
    Dan Abel
    Sonoma State University
    AIS
    [email protected]
     
  13. gjgee

    gjgee Guest

    You're welcome! The brown sugar helps caramelize the onions and brings
    out their sweetness. You could do the onions to accompany just about
    anything...pork chops are great!

    Another idea, if you're grilling, is the toss the onions with salt,
    pepper, brown sugar and drizzle with olive oil. Carefully grill the
    onion slices. If you have one of those grill baskets, all the better,
    so you don't lose any of the onions between the grates.
     
  14. gjgee wrote:

    > You're welcome! The brown sugar helps caramelize the onions and brings
    > out their sweetness.


    Of all things we eat as vegetables, onions have the most sugar. If you
    cook onions in a non-stick skillet - plain with *nothing* added - on low
    heat for 45 minutes of so, they'll caramelize to a rich, dark brown and
    have a wonderful, subtle onion sweetness. I did this for onion soup in
    my restaurants and still do it at home.

    Pastorio's Onion Soup
    5 pounds yellow onions
    2 quarts chicken stock
    2 quarts beef stock
    1/2 cup marsala wine
    2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
    Peel and slice the onions thinly and put into a non-stick skillet on low
    heat. Stir occasionally until they become dark brown - not black - and
    sticky-sweet, at least 45 minutes. Meanwhile combine hte two stocks and
    slowly reduce by about 1/3. When the onons are dark brown, add them to
    the stocks. The skillet will have bits of browned onion stuck to it. Use
    the wine to deglaze the pan - pour the wine into it and stir it around
    over medium heat to get the bits off the pan. When it's deglazed, dump
    the wine glaze into the stocks. Add the Worcestershirte sauce and simmer
    for 30 minutes. Pour into crocks, put a grilled or toasted piece of
    French or Italian bread on top, cover with a slice of Swiss or Provolone
    adn put under hte broiler to toast the cheese.

    For a knockout variant, put a slice of bread in the bottom of hte crock,
    break a raw egg into the crock, fill with hot onion soup and finish as
    above. Serve quickly. To eat, break through the cheese and crouton and
    stir the egg through the soup. It'll make it creamy and very rich. Good
    wine, some fruit to finish and a nap.

    > You could do the onions to accompany just about
    > anything...pork chops are great!


    The caramelized onions described above are wonderful as a stuffing. Cut
    a pouch in a chop or cutlet or boneless chicken thigh, stuff it with a
    tablespoon or two of the onions and saute. A cream sauce also benefits
    from some onions added. And best of all is to put some of that sauce
    over top.

    Pastorio

    > Another idea, if you're grilling, is the toss the onions with salt,
    > pepper, brown sugar and drizzle with olive oil. Carefully grill the
    > onion slices. If you have one of those grill baskets, all the better,
    > so you don't lose any of the onions between the grates.
     
  15. rmg

    rmg Guest

    "Dan Abel" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>, "Dee Randall"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    > > I've not been able to discern the difference between any sweet onions;
    > > vidalias, walla-wallas, Maui onions, the Peruvian onions.

    >
    > The difference is that they don't ship or keep as well as regular onions,
    > so you are better off buying them where they are grown:



    Hmmmm. How would you make sure 3 huge ones didn't go south barring eating an
    onion a day? I guess for starters I'll take them out of that plastic bag.
     
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