child seat - 8 months too young?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Cynic, May 19, 2003.

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  1. Cynic

    Cynic Guest

    I would love to take my 8-month old daughter for rides on a bike trail near my house. It is paved
    and completely level. I'm attempting to find info online on what type of bike seat I can use, as
    well as a helmet. Friends of mine purchased a bike seat & helmet for their daughter when she was
    8-months old, but they were told by one bike shop that babies should be 12 months old.

    Anyway, I know that there are the trailers, but to be honest, I can't find any guide to how old a
    baby should be with those either. Besides, this trail is essentially 12 miles of newly-paved level
    surface, so I'm not that concerned about an accident.

    Any comments/suggestions would be great. Thanks!
     
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  2. Pat

    Pat Guest

    When my son was that age, I put him in a backpack made especially for babies. It was more stable
    than the seat on the back of the bike, because in that seat, he kept throwing his weight to the left
    or right in an effort to see around my back. Up high, he could see better and tended to be
    still--and happy.

    Pat

    "Cynic" <dfee> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I would love to take my 8-month old daughter for rides on a bike trail
    near
    > my house. It is paved and completely level. I'm attempting to find info online on what type of
    > bike seat I can use, as well as a helmet. Friends
    of
    > mine purchased a bike seat & helmet for their daughter when she was
    8-months
    > old, but they were told by one bike shop that babies should be 12 months old.
    >
    > Anyway, I know that there are the trailers, but to be honest, I can't find any guide to how old a
    > baby should be with those either. Besides, this trail is essentially 12 miles of newly-paved level
    > surface, so I'm not
    that
    > concerned about an accident.
    >
    > Any comments/suggestions would be great. Thanks!
     
  3. On Mon, 19 May 2003 10:58:46 +0000, Cynic wrote:

    > I would love to take my 8-month old daughter for rides on a bike trail near my house. It is paved
    > and completely level. I'm attempting to find info online on what type of bike seat I can use, as
    > well as a helmet. Friends of mine purchased a bike seat & helmet for their daughter when she was
    > 8-months old, but they were told by one bike shop that babies should be 12 months old.
    >
    > Anyway, I know that there are the trailers, but to be honest, I can't find any guide to how old a
    > baby should be with those either. Besides, this trail is essentially 12 miles of newly-paved level
    > surface, so I'm not that concerned about an accident.
    >
    > Any comments/suggestions would be great. Thanks!

    She should be old enough to hold her head up, sit up by herself, and right herself if she slumps. A
    child helmet is a lot of weight for a baby to carry - they're barely able to carry their head...

    I use a little mirror so I can see how my kids are doing back there. It's hard for kids that young
    to stay in those seats for a long time without falling over.

    I use a Rhode Gear seat and a kid helmet. Try to get a helmet that doesn't cover her ears; my kids
    hated that kind.

    -Dondo
     
  4. Kev C

    Kev C Guest

    Cynic typed the following

    > I would love to take my 8-month old daughter for rides on a bike trail near my house. It is paved
    > and completely level. I'm attempting to find info online on what type of bike seat I can use, as
    > well as a helmet. Friends of mine purchased a bike seat & helmet for their daughter when she was
    > 8-months old, but they were told by one bike shop that babies should be 12 months old.
    >
    > Anyway, I know that there are the trailers, but to be honest, I can't find any guide to how old a
    > baby should be with those either. Besides, this trail is essentially 12 miles of newly-paved level
    > surface, so I'm not that concerned about an accident.
    >
    > Any comments/suggestions would be great. Thanks!

    Don't like the look of any seat that means the baby stays with the 'bike in an accident.The
    papoose idea just feels safer.You should be concerned for all "accidents" even a small laying
    down of the 'bike,which normally you wouldn't even rate, will cause distress possibly injury to
    anybody who is basicaly tied to the 'bike,if they are not strapped in they are free to cause
    accidents,if they are they can't escape even a minor accident. Mind you I am the sort who doesn't
    like my eldest son running when he pushes his wee brother in the buggy as a momentary lapse can
    cause the buggy to shoot into the road with no quick way for the youngest to extricate himself.So
    I may be being a bit of a worry wart. Go trailer with flags on whippy(fibreglass?)poles

    --
    yours K (Addy not usable [not that you would try it anyway]) There wis a Hare ran tae a burn it ran
    sae fast it couldnae turn \\SPLASH// :eek:) [Please note grammar and descriptions are loose so no
    flaming me please]
     
  5. My son, now 14, went into a rear mounted child seat, wearing a helmet, as soon as he could hold up
    his head on his own. My bike was my main form of transport so I needed to be able to transport the
    genetic material around with me :) It hasn't done him any harm and he now rides his own bikes!

    The child seat I used was quite a robust one - the seat itself had a high back, so the child's head
    was not exposed at all. It was quite "wrap-around" in terms of side covering and his legs were
    almost completely encased plus it had strong foot rests. He was held in by a five point harness and
    then there was a sort of roll-bar thing in front he used as a hand rest. On the back of the seat I
    had *lots* of reflective/day-glo tape, and same down side of leg casing parts - so we were very,
    very visible.

    I never had any problems with the seat and my son loved it - he'd often sleep in it within a
    minute or two of setting off anywhere. I had a handlebar basket for the shopping - so I was well
    loaded down!

    Another option to consider is perhaps something like the Burley trailer.

    See http://www.bicycledoctor.co.uk/children.html

    Cheers, helen s

    ~~~~~~~~~~
    Clean up the waste & get rid of the trapped wind to send a reply

    Any speeliong mistake$ aR the resiult of my cats sitting on the keyboaRRRDdd
    ~~~~~~~~~~
     
  6. Fritz M

    Fritz M Guest

    "Cynic" <dfee> wrote:

    > Anyway, I know that there are the trailers, but to be honest, I can't find any guide to how old a
    > baby should be with those either.

    Baby should be able to hold her head up, even when wearing a helmet. The American Academy of
    Pediatrics recommends one year old for child seats. For some information regarding cycling and
    children (including information about child seats, trailers, and helmets):

    http://www.ibike.org/education/infant.htm http://www.helmets.org/child.htm

    > Besides, this trail is essentially 12 miles of newly-paved level surface, so I'm not that
    > concerned about an accident.

    Data from Kaplan's study:

    Cycle paths: 292 accidents per million cycle miles. Minor roads: 104 accidents Major Roads:
    111 accidents

    "Serious accidents" (defined to be an accident where medical treatment was necessary) were roughly
    about double on paths than on the road. "Cycle paths" are defined to be off-street bicycle
    facilities. Facilities today are typically much better designed than they were when Kaplan did his
    study nearly 30 years ago, but accident rates on paths are still higher than on the road.

    Injury to yourself when a path collision happens will probably be a scraped knee at worst, but an
    infant in a child seat might have serious head trauma. A trailer is probably safer than a child seat
    in a collision on a multi-user path(MUP).

    RFM
    --
    To reply, translate domain from l33+ 2p33|< to alpha. 4=a 0=o 3=e +=t
     
  7. R.White

    R.White Guest

    "Cynic" <dfee> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I would love to take my 8-month old daughter for rides on a bike trail near my house. It is paved
    > and completely level. I'm attempting to find info online on what type of bike seat I can use, as
    > well as a helmet. Friends of mine purchased a bike seat & helmet for their daughter when she was
    > 8-months old, but they were told by one bike shop that babies should be 12 months old.
    >
    > Anyway, I know that there are the trailers, but to be honest, I can't find any guide to how old a
    > baby should be with those either. Besides, this trail is essentially 12 miles of newly-paved level
    > surface, so I'm not that concerned about an accident.

    We had our daughter in a trailer at that age, but we had her in a car seat strapped in the trailer
    so she was reclining. She slept alot, but when she was awake, she enjoyed it. We didn't use a helmet
    on her as we felt it was too warm and being strapped in a car seat that was strapped in a Cannondale
    trailer ( the older one with the plastic pan and aluminum "roll bar") there was little chance of her
    head being injured even if the trailer rolled over. I'm sure some naysayer will pick up on there
    being at least "a little" chance for head injury but IMO, there wasn't ANY unless she was hit with
    some space junk falling from the sky.
     
  8. Cynic

    Cynic Guest

    Thanks for all of your great comments. I think I'll wait until she's 12-months old and make the
    trailer/seat decision then. From what I have read, 8 months is too young.
     
  9. Kev C wrote:
    >
    > Don't like the look of any seat that means the baby stays with the 'bike in an accident.The
    > papoose idea just feels safer.You should be concerned for all "accidents" even a small laying
    > down of the 'bike,which normally you wouldn't even rate, will cause distress possibly injury to
    > anybody who is basicaly tied to the 'bike,if they are not strapped in they are free to cause
    > accidents,if they are they can't escape even a minor accident.
    >

    First, in answer to the original question, yeah, a year old is more normal, as the child has to have
    enough neck strength to hold up their head and helmet in a jouncy environment.

    As to Kev's posting, he seems to be advocating that being 'thrown clear' is a good thing. Yikes.

    FWIW, my son and I 'went down' twice when he was in a back-of-the-bike child seat. The first time
    was at very slow speed on ice (on a park trail) and nothing happened. The sides of the seat hit the
    ground, he didn't.

    The second time, we were crash by a lane-changing car. The bike flipped, I broke my arm, but he
    remained strapped in and was fine. As the bike came down on top of me, he probably didn't hit the
    ground. We were both checked at hospital, of course, and both helmets were replaced (as was the bike
    - the frame was bent by the impact.)
     
  10. "Cynic" <dfee> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Thanks for all of your great comments. I think I'll wait until she's 12-months old and make the
    > trailer/seat decision then. From what I have read, 8 months is too young.
    >
    >

    I know many safety concious people that consider 7 mos. to be fine. Holding head up (strongly,
    without wobbling with helmet on), and able to sit up on their own are the usual criteria.
     
  11. Kev C

    Kev C Guest

    Brian Huntley typed the following

    >
    > As to Kev's posting, he seems to be advocating that being 'thrown clear' is a good thing. Yikes.

    There is no way I'd advocate being thrown clear .I just don't like the "idea" of child seats on
    bikes,as I seem to recall I actually said go trailer you would have a hard job being thrown
    clear of that

    >
    > The second time, we were crash by a lane-changing car. The bike flipped, I broke my arm, but he
    > remained strapped in and was fine. As the bike came down on top of me, he probably didn't hit the
    > ground. We were both checked at hospital, of course, and both helmets were replaced (as was the
    > bike - the frame was bent by the impact.)

    There was a man who read about a queue standing at a bus stop,a bus went out of control and mowed
    down all the people at the stop .So he decided standing on the pavement wasn't a good idea ,from
    that day on he stood/walked on the road.

    --
    yours K (Addy not usable [not that you would try it anyway]) There wis a Hare ran tae a burn it ran
    sae fast it couldnae turn \\SPLASH// :eek:) [Please note grammar and descriptions are loose so no
    flaming me please]
     
  12. Keven Ruf

    Keven Ruf Guest

    "Cynic" <dfee> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Thanks for all of your great comments. I think I'll wait until she's 12-months old and make the
    > trailer/seat decision then. From what I have read, 8 months is too young.

    My son was able to hold his head up with a helmet on at 6 months, and we started riding twice a week
    from his day care to home at that point. I think it depends on your child's development more than
    any age. Like potty training, which he is off and on interested in.

    --Keven
     
  13. Barry Gaudet

    Barry Gaudet Guest

    Kev C <[email protected]> wrote: [...]
    : Go trailer with flags on whippy(fibreglass?)poles

    I dont have any kids and I guess they are no less safe but when I see one of those kiddie trailers
    in traffic it makes me wince.

    --
    'They paved paradise And put up a parking lot' -Joni Mitchell
     
  14. Kev C

    Kev C Guest

    Barry Gaudet typed the following

    > Kev C <[email protected]> wrote: [...]
    >> Go trailer with flags on whippy(fibreglass?)poles
    >
    > I dont have any kids and I guess they are no less safe but when I see one of those kiddie
    > trailers in traffic it makes me wince.

    I don't really fancy trailers or seats, but to me the trailer seems safer not safe but safer.Just
    because we (tinw) CAN use 'bikes all the time(time restraints not withstanding) I don't see the
    necessity to always use a 'bike I am all for kids having there own 'bike,however I can see no
    reason to take them on your 'bike.I am speaking here as someone who has got on a bus with a buggy
    with nappies juice bottle e.t.c. on the buggy and as my youngest doesn,t have a very strong chest
    (BPD) I have got on the bus with him at 7 years old with an adapted buggy thing,yes it wasn't easy
    (I put him in the wheelchair space that is availlable on Edinburgh UK buses)but I would rather do
    that than try and fit them on a seat on a 'bike.At a push I would use a trailer but I am no great
    fan of either method.Mind you I didn't like the "you have no control" feel when being given a lift
    on the back of someone else's 'bike (a "backie")(oopps highly illegal, but I was a kid at the
    time),so I may be biased. Having said that,Edinburgh is built on seven hills(a la Rome)and it is a
    city so YMMV

    --
    yours K (Addy not usable [not that you would try it anyway]) There wis a Hare ran tae a burn it ran
    sae fast it couldnae turn \\SPLASH// :eek:) [Please note grammar and descriptions are loose so no
    flaming me please]
     
  15. Barry Gaudet

    Barry Gaudet Guest

    Kev C <[email protected]> wrote:

    : Barry Gaudet typed the following

    :> Kev C <[email protected]> wrote: [...]
    :>> Go trailer with flags on whippy(fibreglass?)poles
    :>
    :> I dont have any kids and I guess they are no less safe but when I see one of those kiddie
    :> trailers in traffic it makes me wince.

    : I don't really fancy trailers or seats, but to me the trailer seems safer not safe but safer.

    Like I said I'm not passing judgement on any form of child passenger get-up. I know I'm
    unknowledgeable about such things.

    It's just the thought brings to mind a bike with trailer I saw a few years ago in traffic in a left
    turn lane surrounded by autos. Flags on whippy poles notwithstanding; It just made me wince.

    --
    'They paved paradise And put up a parking lot' -Joni Mitchell
     
  16. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    22 May 2003 03:49:41 GMT, <[email protected]>, Barry Gaudet
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Kev C <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >: Barry Gaudet typed the following
    >
    >:> Kev C <[email protected]> wrote: [...]
    >:>> Go trailer with flags on whippy(fibreglass?)poles
    >:>
    >:> I dont have any kids and I guess they are no less safe but when I see one of those kiddie
    >:> trailers in traffic it makes me wince.
    >
    >: I don't really fancy trailers or seats, but to me the trailer seems safer not safe but safer.
    >
    >
    > Like I said I'm not passing judgement on any form of child passenger get-up. I know I'm
    > unknowledgeable about such things.
    >
    >
    > It's just the thought brings to mind a bike with trailer I saw a few years ago in traffic in a
    > left turn lane surrounded by autos. Flags on whippy poles notwithstanding; It just made me wince.

    I know what you mean. They're so low. I'd imagine the driver approaching one hauling children would
    also wince and be extra cautious.

    The whippy flags present a small profile when viewed in-line with the wind. It's easy to see the
    rider's colourful clothes first and completely miss the flag. IMO, a white helmet is more readily
    visible than those flags.

    I was riding with a guy who built himself a chopper with a side car for his 5 yr.old son. It's the
    possibly the safest and most sociable configuration. Neat rig.
    --
    zk
     
  17. Barry Gaudet

    Barry Gaudet Guest

    Zoot Katz <[email protected]> wrote:
    : Barry Gaudet <[email protected]> wrote:
    [...]
    :> It's just the thought brings to mind a bike with trailer I saw a few years ago in traffic in a
    :> left turn lane surrounded by autos. Flags on whippy poles notwithstanding; It just made me wince.

    : I know what you mean. They're so low. I'd imagine the driver approaching one hauling children
    : would also wince and be extra cautious.

    I thought that if I were to require a child seat I'd feel most comfortable with the seat somehow on
    the crossbar so that my body enveloped the child. It might be a false sense of security but it
    would at least give the illusion of being able to protect the child.

    --
    'They paved paradise And put up a parking lot' -Joni Mitchell
     
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