childhood diabetes / diet

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Doe, Sep 20, 2003.

  1. Doe

    Doe Guest

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    Childhood Diabetes: Is Diet a Major Culprit?

    Meat and Dairy Associated With Higher Risk, Cereals With Lower Risk By Laurie Barclay, MD

    WebMD Medical News Reviewed by Dr. Richard Roberson June 30, 2000 -- Eating more meat and dairy
    products has been linked to a higher rate of type 1 diabetes (also known as juvenile diabetes), and
    having a diet heavy in plant products -- especially cereals -- was tied to less type 1 diabetes, a
    recent study suggests. So does this mean that serving oatmeal instead of bacon cheeseburgers will
    prevent your child from getting diabetes?

    Read more at: http://webmd.lycos.com/content/article/1728.58930

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    Who loves ya. Tom Jesus Was A Vegetarian! http://jesuswasavegetarian.7h.com Man Is A Herbivore!
    http://pages.ivillage.com/ironjustice/manisaherbivore DEAD PEOPLE WALKING
    http://pages.ivillage.com/ironjustice/deadpeoplewalking
     
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  2. Tcomeau

    Tcomeau Guest

    [email protected] (doe) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------
    > ------
    >
    > Childhood Diabetes: Is Diet a Major Culprit?
    >
    > Meat and Dairy Associated With Higher Risk, Cereals With Lower Risk By Laurie Barclay, MD
    >
    > WebMD Medical News Reviewed by Dr. Richard Roberson June 30, 2000 -- Eating more meat and dairy
    > products has been linked to a higher rate of type 1 diabetes (also known as juvenile diabetes),
    > and having a diet heavy in plant products -- especially cereals -- was tied to less type 1
    > diabetes, a recent study suggests. So does this mean that serving oatmeal instead of bacon
    > cheeseburgers will prevent your child from getting diabetes?
    >
    > Read more at: http://webmd.lycos.com/content/article/1728.58930
    >
    >
    >
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------
    > ------
    >
    > Who loves ya. Tom Jesus Was A Vegetarian! http://jesuswasavegetarian.7h.com Man Is A Herbivore!
    > http://pages.ivillage.com/ironjustice/manisaherbivore DEAD PEOPLE WALKING
    > http://pages.ivillage.com/ironjustice/deadpeoplewalking

    Is this the study referenced? I notice that the report does not give the studies name or the name of
    the authors, yet again. Kinda fishy.

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    Carbohydrate intake and biomarkers of glycemic control among US adults: the third National Health
    and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III)1,2,3 Eun Ju Yang, Jean M Kerver, Yi Kyung Park, Jean
    Kayitsinga, David B Allison and Won O Song 1 From the Food and Nutrition Database Research Center,
    Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State University, East Lansing (EJY, JMK,
    and WOS); the School of Public Health, Harvard University, Boston (YKP); the Michigan Public Health
    Institute, Okemos (JK); and the Department of Biostatistics, Section on Statistical Genetics and the
    Clinical Nutrition Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham (DBA).

    Background: Recommendations for preventing and treating type 2 diabetes include consuming
    carbohydrates, predominantly from whole grains, fruit, vegetables, and low-fat milk. However, the
    quantity and type of carbohydrates consumed may contribute to disorders of glycemic control.

    Objective: We evaluated the association between carbohydrate intakes and biomarkers of glycemic
    control in a nationally representative sample of healthy US adults who participated in a
    cross-sectional study, the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Design: The sample (5730 men and 6125 women aged ≥ 20 y) was divided into quintiles of
    carbohydrate intake (as a percentage of energy). Carbohydrate intakes were examined in relation to
    glycated hemoglobin (Hb A1c), plasma glucose, serum C-peptide, and serum insulin concentrations by
    using logistic regression.

    Results: Carbohydrate intakes were not associated with Hb A1c, plasma glucose, or serum insulin
    concentrations in men or women after adjustment for confounding variables. Carbohydrate intakes were
    inversely associated with serum C-peptide concentrations in men and women. Odds ratios for elevated
    serum C-peptide concentrations for increasing quintiles of carbohydrate intake were 1.00, 0.88,
    0.57, .39, and 0.75 (P for trend = 0.016) in men, and 1.00, 0.69, 0.57, .36, and 0.41 (P for trend =
    0.007) in women. When carbohydrate intakes were further adjusted for intakes of total and added
    sugar, the association of serum C-peptide with carbohydrate intakes was strengthened in men.

    Conclusions: Carbohydrate intakes were not associated with Hb A1c, plasma glucose, or serum insulin
    concentrations but were inversely associated with the risk of elevated serum C-peptide; this
    supports current recommendations regarding carbohydrate intake in healthy adults.

    *******************

    Dr David Allison, the top research whore of the pharmaceutical and food industries strikes again.

    Here are links to various studies that a certain Dr DB Allison has been involved in. Most attempt to
    find or demonstrate a link between genetics and obesity. This guy has put a lot of effort in showing
    a link between genes and obesity.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12537879&dop-
    t=Abstract

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12075568&dop-
    t=Abstract

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=11319658&dop-
    t=Abstract

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10951545&dop-
    t=Abstract

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10547920&dop-
    t=Abstract

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10390261&dop-
    t=Abstract

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=8782724&dopt=Abstract

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=7550524&dopt=Abstract

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=7726233&dopt=Abstract

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=7957015&dopt=Abstract

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=8081426&dopt=Abstract

    This guy has been involved in no less than 11 studies that seem to want to insist that obesity
    is genetic.

    Who is this guy? Here is a biographical sketch:

    http://www.soph.uab.edu/statgenetics/People/DAllison/dallison.html.

    Quote:

    "has been a member of the Board of Trustees for the International Life Science Institute, North
    America, since January 2002."

    Here are the corporate sponsors of the ILSI of which he is a member of the board of trustees.

    http://www.ilsi.org/about/Assembly_of_Members.pdf

    His CV says he is a member of the Advisory Board of the Partnership for the Promotion of Healthy
    Eating and Active Lifestyles (PPHEAL). Here are their sponsors:

    http://www.ppheal.org/our_sponsors.html

    More copied and pasted from his CV:
    **************************************************************
    · Member of Scientific Advisory Board for NutriPharma, Inc., 2000 – Present. · Consultant to
    Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceuticals on the anit-obesity potential of their compound Topiramate, February,
    2002. · Consultant to Mitos, Inc regarding the testing of novel anti-obesity compounds, 2000 - 2001.
    · Consultant to Archer, Daniels, Midland Company, 2002. · Consultant to Merck Pharmaceuticals
    regarding measurement and design issues in obesity related clinical trials, 2000. · Consultant to
    Millennium Pharmaceuticals Incorporated on issues related to the genetic influences on obesity, 1999
    – 2001. · Consultant to AMGEN on issues related to the clinical study of leptin as an
    anti-obesity therapeutic, 1999. · Consultant to Regeneron Pharmaceuticals on issues related to the
    treatment of human obesity, 1999. · Consultant to Fisons Corporation & Mediva Pharmaceuticals
    regarding anti-obesity drug litigation, 1998.

    · Consultant to Eli Lilly Pharmaceuticals on weight gain with neuroleptic medication, 1997-Present.
    · Consultant to Pfizer Central Research, Inc. on obesity related issues, 1997-Present. · Consultant
    to Proctor & Gamble regarding olestra (Olean); 1998. · Consultant to Decision Resources on the
    pharmacological treatment of obesity, October, 1999. · Member of “Panel of Evaluators”
    for Current Drugs Ltd, a company that provides expert information on drugs under research and
    development, 1998. · Consultant to Research Testing Laboratories, Inc. regarding clinical trials of
    weight loss products including nutraceuticals and herbal preparations, 1996, 1999 - present. ·
    Member of the Nutritional Advisory Board for Nabisco, Inc., 1994 - 2000. · Member of the United
    Soybean Panel’s Nutrition Advisory Board, 1996
    - Present. Chair of research grants committee, 1999 – present. · Member of the Wheat
    Council’s panel of experts, 1998 – 2001. · Consultant to Knoll Pharmaceuticals
    regarding issues in the pharmacological treatment of obesity
    - Sept, 1996; April, 1997. · Consultant to Corning HTA (for a project sponsored by Wyeth Ayerst)
    regarding the economic benefits of obesity treatment, 1996-1997. · Consultant to the journal
    Patient Care on an article regarding the pharmacological treatment of obesity, 1997. ·
    Consultant to Glaxo Pharmaceuticals regarding issues in the pharmacological treatment of obesity
    - Sept, 1996.
    ****************************************************************************

    What would happen if we all just accepted the idea that we have no control over obesity and
    diabetes? Don't bother trying because it is all genetic anyways. Obesity and obesity related disease
    would become the norm and the pharmaceutical industry would make a killing, literally and
    figuratively.

    Here is how obesity is genetic. For millions of years our species evolved with no refined
    carbohydrates in our diet. Now we consume immense amounts of refined carbohydrates and we become
    obese and diabetic in numbers never seen before. We are genetically hard-wired to live on a diet
    with no refined carbohydrates.

    TC
     
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