Chile Relleno cheese

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by notbob, Aug 18, 2005.

  1. notbob

    notbob Guest

    I love a good chile relleno, but hate Monterey jack cheese, the cheese
    that epitomizes everything wrong with American cheeses. I'm not real
    familiar with Mexican cheeses so would like recommendations on which
    is best suited for rellenos.

    nb
     
    Tags:


  2. Dean G.

    Dean G. Guest

    Try Asadero, Queso Blanco, Queso Anejo, Queso de Bola, or (actually
    Spanish) Manchego.

    Dean G.

    P.S. The cheese that "epitomizes everything wrong with American
    cheeses" is Co-Jack.
     
  3. Bob

    Bob Guest

    notbob wrote:

    >I love a good chile relleno, but hate Monterey jack cheese, the cheese
    > that epitomizes everything wrong with American cheeses. I'm not real
    > familiar with Mexican cheeses so would like recommendations on which
    > is best suited for rellenos.


    Rick Bayless recommends Mexican Chihuahua cheese for rellenos. (Ay!
    Chihuahua!) But in poking around for an answer to this question, most of
    the relleno recipes I saw didn't have cheese at all; the chiles were stuffed
    with a meat mixture instead.

    Bob
     
  4. J. E. Durbin

    J. E. Durbin Guest

    On Thu, 18 Aug 2005 14:32:30 -0500, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I love a good chile relleno, but hate Monterey jack cheese, the cheese
    >that epitomizes everything wrong with American cheeses. I'm not real
    >familiar with Mexican cheeses so would like recommendations on which
    >is best suited for rellenos.


    It's far from authentic, but I was making chiles rellenos once and had
    forgot to buy the cheese, so I used an Italian Fontina and just a
    little Swiss that I had in the fridge. Two cheeses have a slightly
    nutty taste and melted to just the right consistency.

    It was great, trust me.
     
  5. "notbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I love a good chile relleno, but hate Monterey jack cheese, the cheese
    > that epitomizes everything wrong with American cheeses. I'm not real
    > familiar with Mexican cheeses so would like recommendations on which
    > is best suited for rellenos.
    >
    > nb


    Evidentially you are not familiar with American cheeses either Notbob. If
    you are eating a mass produced Monterey Jack cheese you are not getting a
    good cheese. Try one of the artesian-made Jacks. They have a rich, mild,
    buttery flavor. Better yet, try an aged Monterey Jack. A well aged Monterey
    Jack is a mighty fine cheese, the equal of any good dry grating cheese. I'm
    not fond of smoked cheeses, but smoked Monterey Jack is an excellent cheese.

    What is wrong with American cheeses anyway? Seems like a very general
    statement Notbob. As far as I can see, there are many outstanding American
    cheeses; Crater Lake Blue comes to mind immediately!

    Charlie
     
  6. Faux_Pseudo

    Faux_Pseudo Guest

    _.-In rec.food.cooking, Charles Gifford wrote the following -._
    > What is wrong with American cheeses anyway? Seems like a very general
    > statement Notbob. As far as I can see, there are many outstanding American
    > cheeses; Crater Lake Blue comes to mind immediately!


    "American cheeses" are fine. "American Cheese" is a sin even in the
    atheist bible. For more on AC see:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_cheese

    Due to the processing and additives, some varieties cannot
    legally be labeled as "cheese" in many countries, including the
    United States and Great Britain, and so are sold as "cheese
    food", "cheese spread", or "cheese product"

    --
    .-')) fauxascii.com ('-. | It's a damn poor mind that
    ' ..- .:" ) ( ":. -.. ' | can only think of one way to
    ((,,_;'.;' UIN=66618055 ';. ';_,,)) | spell a word.
    ((_.YIM=Faux_Pseudo :._)) | - Andrew Jackson
     
  7. Dimitri

    Dimitri Guest

    "notbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I love a good chile relleno, but hate Monterey jack cheese, the cheese
    > that epitomizes everything wrong with American cheeses. I'm not real
    > familiar with Mexican cheeses so would like recommendations on which
    > is best suited for rellenos.
    >
    > nb


    Look here:

    http://www.specialcheese.com/queso.htm

    I don't know what you have available but there are several that will do nicely.

    Dimitri
     
  8. notbob

    notbob Guest

    On 2005-08-18, Charles Gifford <[email protected]> wrote:

    > If
    > you are eating a mass produced Monterey Jack cheese you are not getting a
    > good cheese.


    That was my point, and no, I don't eat it. It's crap. It's so
    tasteless and dull it needs horseradish and peppers and a bunch of
    other crud ...including smoke!.... to give it any flavor.

    > Try one of the artesian-made Jacks.


    Yes, I'm sure there are some good boutique jacks out there somewhere.
    But, none around here and I'm not in the mood to go traipsing all over
    the Bay Area wasting gas just to find some insanely overpriced craft
    cheese for rellenos.

    > What is wrong with American cheeses anyway? Seems like a very general
    > statement Notbob. As far as I can see, there are many outstanding American
    > cheeses; Crater Lake Blue comes to mind immediately!


    Well, till it comes to MY store it's not likely to come to MY mind.

    Perhaps I should have said "most American cheeses". Yes, there are a
    few good cheeses out there ....somewhere. My fave cheddar is a 4 yr
    old yellow from VT I get at TJ's. It's awesome. But, most of it is
    dreck. That crud they're pushing as Real California Cheese is, in
    fact, Really Crappy Cheese.

    nb
     
  9. On Fri, 19 Aug 2005 00:14:39 GMT, "Dimitri" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >"notbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >>I love a good chile relleno, but hate Monterey jack cheese, the cheese
    >> that epitomizes everything wrong with American cheeses. I'm not real
    >> familiar with Mexican cheeses so would like recommendations on which
    >> is best suited for rellenos.
    >>
    >> nb

    >
    >Look here:
    >
    >http://www.specialcheese.com/queso.htm
    >
    >I don't know what you have available but there are several that will do nicely.
    >
    >Dimitri
    >


    Here in NM, I see Asadero used frequently.. Combined with fresh
    roasted Hatch chiles...mmmmmmmmmm

    Christine
     
  10. notbob

    notbob Guest

    On 2005-08-19, Christine Dabney <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Here in NM, I see Asadero used frequently.. Combined with fresh
    > roasted Hatch chiles...mmmmmmmmmm


    Funny you should mention Hatch chiles. That's exactly what I'm making
    rellenos with, or so I think.

    Nob Hill is selling so-called Hatch chiles for $.79lb. But, I always
    thought the classic Hatch chile was just a little bigger than a
    jalapeno. These are about the size of an anaheim chile, about 7-8
    inches long and about 2 inches wide at the top and pointy at the
    bottom. I have my doubts if they are authentic Hatch, but they are
    gorgeous chiles. Firm, thick and a beautiful emerald green. Whatchya
    think?

    I'll try the asadero.

    nb
     
  11. On Thu 18 Aug 2005 06:48:07p, notbob wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > On 2005-08-19, Christine Dabney <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Here in NM, I see Asadero used frequently.. Combined with fresh
    >> roasted Hatch chiles...mmmmmmmmmm

    >
    > Funny you should mention Hatch chiles. That's exactly what I'm making
    > rellenos with, or so I think.
    >
    > Nob Hill is selling so-called Hatch chiles for $.79lb. But, I always
    > thought the classic Hatch chile was just a little bigger than a
    > jalapeno. These are about the size of an anaheim chile, about 7-8
    > inches long and about 2 inches wide at the top and pointy at the
    > bottom. I have my doubts if they are authentic Hatch, but they are
    > gorgeous chiles. Firm, thick and a beautiful emerald green. Whatchya
    > think?
    >
    > I'll try the asadero.
    >
    > nb
    >


    I think we also get the large size you describe here in AZ markets. I've
    never seen anything different.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    ____________________________________________

    Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974


    ---
    avast! Antivirus: Outbound message clean.
    Virus Database (VPS): 0533-3, 08/17/2005
    Tested on: 8/18/2005 6:55:28 PM
    avast! - copyright (c) 1988-2005 ALWIL Software.
    http://www.avast.com
     
  12. notbob wrote:
    > On 2005-08-19, Christine Dabney <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Here in NM, I see Asadero used frequently.. Combined with fresh
    > > roasted Hatch chiles...mmmmmmmmmm

    >
    > Funny you should mention Hatch chiles. That's exactly what I'm making
    > rellenos with, or so I think.
    >
    > Nob Hill is selling so-called Hatch chiles for $.79lb. But, I always
    > thought the classic Hatch chile was just a little bigger than a
    > jalapeno. These are about the size of an anaheim chile, about 7-8
    > inches long and about 2 inches wide at the top and pointy at the
    > bottom. I have my doubts if they are authentic Hatch, but they are
    > gorgeous chiles. Firm, thick and a beautiful emerald green. Whatchya
    > think?
    >
    > I'll try the asadero.


    Hatch is a town in the Mesilla Valley where most of the fresh chiles
    shipped out of state come from. Most of the chiles grown down there
    AFAIK are a variety selected by New Mexico State, the local land grant
    university. The Anaheim variety is a mild clone of the New Mexico
    variety(ies). They look identical to me. Another source of chile is
    from the northern part of the state, Chimayo being the best known
    region. But, i have never run across fresh chiles from the north, Only
    the dried variety. There is a very real difference in flavor between
    the northern and southern dried chiles and I urge you to try both.
    Both types have their fans and I'll say no more about that. My main
    concern for rellenos is finding a green chile which is firm and thick
    enough to make a succulent relleno. And I like traditional Monterey
    Jack from the wheel for stuffing. It used to be common here but now
    it's being called 'artisan' and is priced with the imports. I think we
    need more savvy consumers (rant! rant!). I've always thought
    Italian-made Fontina Or Fontinal would be good in rellenos.

    D.M.
     
  13. On Thu, 18 Aug 2005 20:48:07 -0500, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 2005-08-19, Christine Dabney <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Here in NM, I see Asadero used frequently.. Combined with fresh
    >> roasted Hatch chiles...mmmmmmmmmm

    >
    >Funny you should mention Hatch chiles. That's exactly what I'm making
    >rellenos with, or so I think.
    >
    >Nob Hill is selling so-called Hatch chiles for $.79lb. But, I always
    >thought the classic Hatch chile was just a little bigger than a
    >jalapeno. These are about the size of an anaheim chile, about 7-8
    >inches long and about 2 inches wide at the top and pointy at the
    >bottom. I have my doubts if they are authentic Hatch, but they are
    >gorgeous chiles. Firm, thick and a beautiful emerald green. Whatchya
    >think?


    Sound exactly like the Hatch chiles I see in the stores here in
    Albuquerque.
    Hatch chiles are a variant of Anaheims, so about the same size, etc. I
    think the "terroir" changes their taste, etc. They tend to be a bit
    hotter than regular Anaheims..

    Do a search on Hatch chiles.. ;)

    Christine
     
  14. Dimitri

    Dimitri Guest

    "notbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On 2005-08-19, Christine Dabney <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Here in NM, I see Asadero used frequently.. Combined with fresh
    >> roasted Hatch chiles...mmmmmmmmmm

    >
    > Funny you should mention Hatch chiles. That's exactly what I'm making
    > rellenos with, or so I think.
    >
    > Nob Hill is selling so-called Hatch chiles for $.79lb. But, I always
    > thought the classic Hatch chile was just a little bigger than a
    > jalapeno. These are about the size of an anaheim chile, about 7-8
    > inches long and about 2 inches wide at the top and pointy at the
    > bottom. I have my doubts if they are authentic Hatch, but they are
    > gorgeous chiles. Firm, thick and a beautiful emerald green. Whatchya
    > think?
    >
    > I'll try the asadero.
    >
    > nb


    Good choice not the only thing left is figuring out the batter.

    :)

    You are in for a surprise Hatch are the best - you have/are going to roast off
    the skin right?

    Dimitri
     
  15. notbob

    notbob Guest

    On 2005-08-19, Dimitri <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Good choice not the only thing left is figuring out the batter.


    I'm going with a med thick whipped eggs whites + yolk + flour fried in
    lard.

    > You are in for a surprise Hatch are the best - you have/are going to roast off
    > the skin right?


    Yeah, I'll be whipping out my trusty pair of BernzOmatics.

    nb
     
  16. Dimitri

    Dimitri Guest

    "notbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On 2005-08-19, Dimitri <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> Good choice not the only thing left is figuring out the batter.

    >
    > I'm going with a med thick whipped eggs whites + yolk + flour fried in
    > lard.
    >
    >> You are in for a surprise Hatch are the best - you have/are going to roast
    >> off
    >> the skin right?

    >
    > Yeah, I'll be whipping out my trusty pair of BernzOmatics.
    >
    > nb


    You got it down pat.

    Dimitri
     
  17. Arri London

    Arri London Guest

    notbob wrote:
    >
    > On 2005-08-19, Christine Dabney <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Here in NM, I see Asadero used frequently.. Combined with fresh
    > > roasted Hatch chiles...mmmmmmmmmm

    >
    > Funny you should mention Hatch chiles. That's exactly what I'm making
    > rellenos with, or so I think.
    >
    > Nob Hill is selling so-called Hatch chiles for $.79lb. But, I always
    > thought the classic Hatch chile was just a little bigger than a
    > jalapeno. These are about the size of an anaheim chile, about 7-8
    > inches long and about 2 inches wide at the top and pointy at the
    > bottom. I have my doubts if they are authentic Hatch, but they are
    > gorgeous chiles. Firm, thick and a beautiful emerald green. Whatchya
    > think?
    >
    > I'll try the asadero.
    >
    > nb


    Hatch chiles come in all sorts of sizes including what you mentioned. So
    yes they sound quite correct.
     
  18. Arri London

    Arri London Guest

    Christine Dabney wrote:
    >
    > On Thu, 18 Aug 2005 20:48:07 -0500, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >On 2005-08-19, Christine Dabney <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Here in NM, I see Asadero used frequently.. Combined with fresh
    > >> roasted Hatch chiles...mmmmmmmmmm

    > >
    > >Funny you should mention Hatch chiles. That's exactly what I'm making
    > >rellenos with, or so I think.
    > >
    > >Nob Hill is selling so-called Hatch chiles for $.79lb. But, I always
    > >thought the classic Hatch chile was just a little bigger than a
    > >jalapeno. These are about the size of an anaheim chile, about 7-8
    > >inches long and about 2 inches wide at the top and pointy at the
    > >bottom. I have my doubts if they are authentic Hatch, but they are
    > >gorgeous chiles. Firm, thick and a beautiful emerald green. Whatchya
    > >think?

    >
    > Sound exactly like the Hatch chiles I see in the stores here in
    > Albuquerque.
    > Hatch chiles are a variant of Anaheims, so about the same size, etc. I
    > think the "terroir" changes their taste, etc. They tend to be a bit
    > hotter than regular Anaheims..
    >
    > Do a search on Hatch chiles.. ;)
    >
    > Christine


    LOL Anaheims are the variant, with most of the heat stripped out. The
    chiles harvested now are milder than the ones that will be coming in
    later.
    Need to go out and get some more :)
     
  19. "Faux_Pseudo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:%[email protected]
    > _.-In rec.food.cooking, Charles Gifford wrote the following -._
    > > What is wrong with American cheeses anyway? Seems like a very general
    > > statement Notbob. As far as I can see, there are many outstanding

    American
    > > cheeses; Crater Lake Blue comes to mind immediately!

    >
    > "American cheeses" are fine. "American Cheese" is a sin even in the
    > atheist bible. For more on AC see:
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_cheese
    >
    > Due to the processing and additives, some varieties cannot
    > legally be labeled as "cheese" in many countries, including the
    > United States and Great Britain, and so are sold as "cheese
    > food", "cheese spread", or "cheese product"


    A common error. There are many "cheese foods" and "cheese products" that are
    sold as American Cheese. However there is a true cheese called "American
    Cheese". It is difficult to find in most supermarkets but can be found by
    reading the labels carefully. A real American Cheese is labeled as cheese.
    American Cheese is made in a Cheddaring Process and is very similar to
    Cheddar, but is smoothed and sold very soft and fresh. The lack of aging
    produces a very mild tangy milk flavor. The best place to find real American
    Cheese is at a good deli.

    Charlie
     
  20. "notbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On 2005-08-18, Charles Gifford <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > If
    > > you are eating a mass produced Monterey Jack cheese you are not getting

    a
    > > good cheese.

    >
    > That was my point, and no, I don't eat it. It's crap. It's so
    > tasteless and dull it needs horseradish and peppers and a bunch of
    > other crud ...including smoke!.... to give it any flavor.


    Have you considered that instead of it being "crap", it may just be that you
    don't like it? For those of us who do like it, it certainly isn't crap. I
    don't like Brie, but I certainly wouldn't call it crap. You could say that
    cottage cheese is tastless and dull, but would you call it crap?

    > > Try one of the artesian-made Jacks.

    >
    > Yes, I'm sure there are some good boutique jacks out there somewhere.
    > But, none around here and I'm not in the mood to go traipsing all over
    > the Bay Area wasting gas just to find some insanely overpriced craft
    > cheese for rellenos.


    My local Von's supermarket occasionally has it as does my local cheese
    store. Good cheese is more expensive than poor cheese, but you can certainly
    get good cheese somewhat less than "insanely overpriced".

    > > What is wrong with American cheeses anyway? Seems like a very general
    > > statement Notbob. As far as I can see, there are many outstanding

    American
    > > cheeses; Crater Lake Blue comes to mind immediately!

    >
    > Well, till it comes to MY store it's not likely to come to MY mind.


    I'm afraid I don't remember where in the Bay area you live, but surely you
    have a cheese store and/or Whole Foods store nearby? I note that you have a
    Trader Joes.

    > Perhaps I should have said "most American cheeses". Yes, there are a
    > few good cheeses out there ....somewhere. My fave cheddar is a 4 yr
    > old yellow from VT I get at TJ's. It's awesome. But, most of it is
    > dreck.


    No argument from here! The best Cheddar I've had is a 4 year old,
    unpasturized Farmhouse Cheddar from it's home in England. Damn fine! It was
    expensive though. Generally I am well satisfied with sharp Tillamook.
    Tillamook Oregon is a beautiful area and, from what I've seen, home to a lot
    of really happy looking cows.

    > That crud they're pushing as Real California Cheese is, in
    > fact, Really Crappy Cheese.
    >
    > nb


    The cheeses that carry the "Real California Cheese" logo are generally
    pretty poor alright. Large multi-national companies turning out millions of
    lbs. of poor quality cheese in huge Central California factories. These are
    the same people who turn out millions of lbs. of "Wisconsin" butter. These
    places have nothing about California about them except their location. There
    are many really good California cheeses though. They just don't wear that
    logo.

    Charlie, cheese fan (and notbob fan)
     
Loading...