China Bikes and Lanes

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Al Kubeluis, Feb 23, 2003.

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  1. Al Kubeluis

    Al Kubeluis Guest

    Yo Bikers, Friend of mine is in China and sent following.
    --
    ~~~al.kubeluis..md.usa.earth.sun.milkyway.virgo.universe..corsa~~~

    Except for Yao Ming, I am the tallest person here. There are some foreigners but only in the tourist
    area near the Bund in the Nanking shopping district here in Shanghai. We are 13 hours ahead of you
    so I right this on Sunday morning while it is Saturday night there. It is a city of contrasts. Some
    mornings it is so foggy and smoggy that I can't see beyond
    1/2 mile. Other days, I can see for miles.

    As we have driven around, I have seen the Shanghai of the 50s and 60s and the Shanghai of today. In
    the old days, everyone's dream was to have a basic apartment, a bicycle, a radio, fan, etc. Over the
    last 7 years the city has undergone a construction boom and the area around Pudong across from the
    Bund is ultra modern skyscrapers with modern architecture. It is truly incredible unlike any I have
    seen in the U.S. In this area, the dream is to own a modern condo, with a car (lots of Volkswagen
    and Buick), big screen TV, air conditioning etc. You see both in the city. Every road has a huge
    bike lane and people use it. There are cars as well. There are 6 million bicyles in Shanghai.

    Food, people, everything is different and interesting. People are friendly, helpful and curious.
    China has the financial leverage and low labor rates capable of making it the next great economic
    power. I have truly enjoyed this week even though all of it has been work. Should go to tea gardens
    today if time permits.

    There weather has been so bad that I wasn't able to get good pictures yesterday and Sunday looks
    similar. I will try to get postcards or a picture book.

    Jim
     
    Tags:


  2. When we visited Shanghai in the mid-1980s, we walked along the Bund on a Sunday morning and were
    literally surrounded by dense crowds of hundreds of curious but mostly-smiling Chinese who wanted to
    look at us, talk to us in their minimal English and actually reach out and physically touch us. My
    wife and I were the first live Caucasians they had ever seen. Parents carried their
    one-child-per-couple proudly and the tots were gloriously dressed in multi-colored outfits. These
    "only" children were visibly worshipped by their beaming parents. We also had a fabulous boat trip
    on the Yangtze River, much of which was endlessly lined with obviously polluting light. medium and
    heavy industry. We also visited the Great Wall before there were any tourist accommodations there.
    We were taken to the Great Wall in a Toyota van that bounced and shuddered all the way from Beijing
    to the Great Wall over a two lane, largely broken concrete and sometimes gravel road. We passed lots
    of pedestrians, a number of one-lung gas-powered two wheel carts and some bicycles. The public
    toilets at the Wall ( as in many places) were still pit toilets.

    In Beijing, all the boulevards and streets were crowded with thousands upon thousands of bicycles
    and very, very few motor vehicles ... a few trucks and the occasional military or government car.
    The bikes bunched up by the hundreds at major street intersection traffic lights and in one big
    mass, accelerated away from a dead stop the second the traffic policeman on an elevated platform
    gave the signal. Our (mandatory) guide, a government employee who was head of the Beijing tourist
    office, rode his bike 18 or 20 miles each day to work and home again, weather notwithstanding. And
    Beijing's climate is very similar to the northeastern U.S.

    The Bund looked like a movie set right out of 1930's Cleveland, Ohio. (Yes, I do know what "old
    Cleveland" looked like. I lived in Ohio for 15 years, commencing with college in 1946 and worked for
    the Cleveland Press from 1956-61. )

    Each morning for three straight days, we were driven to the tiny, antiquated Shanghai Airport at
    excruciatingly slow speeds through streets crowded from edge to edge with pedestrians and bicycles,
    the driver steadily honking his horn every few seconds in a hopeless attempt to clear the way. The
    first two days we were told that the flight to Xian had been cancelled and we were returned to our
    hotel in Shanghai, where we continued to enjoy the sights until the next day. Finally, on the third
    day we took off for Xian in a very old, tired, noisy medium-size Russian-built commercial aircraft.
    No one ever told us "why" the delays.
    --
    Gator Bob Siegel EasyRacers Ti Rush

    "Al Kubeluis" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    > Yo Bikers, Friend of mine is in China and sent following.

    > Except for Yao Ming, I am the tallest person here. There are some foreigners but only in the
    > tourist area near the Bund in the Nanking shopping district here in Shanghai. We are 13 hours
    > ahead of you so I
    right
    > this on Sunday morning while it is Saturday night there. It is a city of contrasts. Some mornings
    > it is so foggy and smoggy that I can't see
    beyond
    > 1/2 mile. Other days, I can see for miles.
    >
    > As we have driven around, I have seen the Shanghai of the 50s and 60s and the Shanghai of today.
    > In the old days, everyone's dream was to have a basic apartment, a bicycle, a radio, fan, etc.
    > Over the last 7 years the city has undergone a construction boom and the area around Pudong across
    > from the Bund is ultra modern skyscrapers with modern architecture. It is truly incredible unlike
    > any I have seen in the U.S. In this area, the
    dream
    > is to own a modern condo, with a car (lots of Volkswagen and Buick), big screen TV, air
    > conditioning etc. You see both in the city. Every road
    has
    > a huge bike lane and people use it. There are cars as well. There are 6 million bicycles in
    > Shanghai.
    >
    > Food, people, everything is different and interesting. People are
    friendly,
    > helpful and curious. China has the financial leverage and low labor rates capable of making it the
    > next great economic power. I have truly enjoyed this week even though all of it has been work.
    > Should go to tea gardens today if time permits.
    >
    > There weather has been so bad that I wasn't able to get good pictures yesterday and Sunday looks
    > similar. I will try to get postcards or a picture book.
    >
    > Jim
     
  3. Dave Strauss

    Dave Strauss Guest

    "Al Kubeluis" <[email protected]> writes:
    > Yo Bikers, Friend of mine is in China and sent following.
    > --
    > ~~~al.kubeluis..md.usa.earth.sun.milkyway.virgo.universe..corsa~~~
    >
    > Except for Yao Ming, I am the tallest person here. There are some foreigners but only in the
    > tourist area near the Bund in the Nanking shopping district here in Shanghai. We are 13 hours
    > ahead of you so I right this on Sunday morning while it is Saturday night there. It is a city of
    > contrasts. Some mornings it is so foggy and smoggy that I can't see beyond
    > 1/2 mile. Other days, I can see for miles.
    >
    > As we have driven around, I have seen the Shanghai of the 50s and 60s and the Shanghai of today.
    > In the old days, everyone's dream was to have a basic apartment, a bicycle, a radio, fan, etc.
    > Over the last 7 years the city has undergone a construction boom and the area around Pudong across
    > from the Bund is ultra modern skyscrapers with modern architecture. It is truly incredible unlike
    > any I have seen in the U.S. In this area, the dream is to own a modern condo, with a car (lots of
    > Volkswagen and Buick), big screen TV, air conditioning etc. You see both in the city. Every road
    > has a huge bike lane and people use it. There are cars as well. There are 6 million bicyles in
    > Shanghai.
    >
    > Food, people, everything is different and interesting. People are friendly, helpful and curious.
    > China has the financial leverage and low labor rates capable of making it the next great economic
    > power. I have truly enjoyed this week even though all of it has been work. Should go to tea
    > gardens today if time permits.
    >
    > There weather has been so bad that I wasn't able to get good pictures yesterday and Sunday looks
    > similar. I will try to get postcards or a picture book.
    >
    > Jim
    >

    There are some pictures from my trip to Shanghai last summer at
    http://hofl.toe.doomcom.org/~dstrauss/shanghai , which may give you an idea of what Jim is talking
    about. Lots of HPV content.

    -- Dave Strauss
     
  4. What software did you use? That's outstanding even at 56K downloads.

    --
    Gator Bob Siegel EasyRacers Ti Rush

    "Dave Strauss" >> There are some pictures from my trip to Shanghai last summer
    > at http://hofl.toe.doomcom.org/~dstrauss/shanghai , which may give you an idea of what Jim is
    > talking about. Lots of HPV content.
     
  5. Dave Strauss

    Dave Strauss Guest

    "Robert Siegel" <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    > What software did you use? That's outstanding even at 56K downloads.
    >
    > --
    > Gator Bob Siegel EasyRacers Ti Rush
    >
    > "Dave Strauss" >> There are some pictures from my trip to Shanghai last summer
    > > at http://hofl.toe.doomcom.org/~dstrauss/shanghai , which may give you an idea of what Jim is
    > > talking about. Lots of HPV content.
    >
    >

    Primarily I use a Linux utility called "xloadimage", plus a bash script I wrote to create
    all the html.

    -- Dave Strauss
     
  6. Correction. We visited Shanghai (and much of China) in the Fall of 1983, to be precise.

    --
    Gator Bob Siegel EasyRacers Ti Rush "Robert Siegel" <[email protected]> wrote
    > When we visited Shanghai in the mid-1980s,
     
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