Chinese Imperial Palace Egg Drop Soup

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by BabyJane Hudson, Feb 5, 2006.

  1. Chinese Imperial Palace Egg Drop Soup

    Ingredients:
    6 C. Chicken Broth
    1 large Egg, lightly beaten with 1 tsp. sesame oil
    1/4 tsp. White Pepper
    4 sliced Green Onion tops for garnish
    Salt to taste

    Preparation:
    Bring the broth to a simmer over low medium heat. Very slowly stream
    in the egg, use a fork to pull strands of the egg gently. Do not stir
    vigorously; you will have a mess if you do. Add white pepper and salt.
    Continue to cook until egg is done. Serve promptly.
     
    Tags:


  2. aem

    aem Guest

    BabyJane Hudson wrote:
    > Chinese Imperial Palace Egg Drop Soup
    >
    > Ingredients:
    > 6 C. Chicken Broth
    > 1 large Egg, lightly beaten with 1 tsp. sesame oil
    > 1/4 tsp. White Pepper
    > 4 sliced Green Onion tops for garnish
    > Salt to taste
    >
    > Preparation:
    > Bring the broth to a simmer over low medium heat. Very slowly stream
    > in the egg, use a fork to pull strands of the egg gently. Do not stir
    > vigorously; you will have a mess if you do. Add white pepper and salt.
    > Continue to cook until egg is done. Serve promptly.


    That's a lot of sesame oil for one egg, but then again for 6 cups soup
    I'd use two eggs. Problem solved.

    The Frug's advice was to pour the eggs in slowly and then _wait_ for
    several seconds before beginning to stir gently. This is good advice.


    Many restaurants will finish by thickening the soup slightly with a
    cornstarch slurry. I don't, but for those who think they're missing
    some texure, that's why.

    It's not traditional but I sometimes sprinkle some cilantro leaves into
    my soup bowl when, as now, the cilantro plants are growing well. -aem
     
  3. sf

    sf Guest

    On Sun, 05 Feb 2006 13:18:15 -0500, BabyJane Hudson wrote:

    > Chinese Imperial Palace Egg Drop Soup
    >

    I subscribe to CopyKat too.
    --

    Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
     
  4. sf

    sf Guest

    On 5 Feb 2006 10:29:09 -0800, aem wrote:

    > It's not traditional but I sometimes sprinkle some cilantro leaves into
    > my soup bowl when, as now, the cilantro plants are growing well. -aem


    Cilantro is a good addition to almost anything. :)
    I particularly like it in vietnamese style grilled chicken sandwiches.
    --

    Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
     
  5. Kathy in NZ

    Kathy in NZ Guest

    On Sun, 05 Feb 2006 12:32:50 -0800, sf <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On 5 Feb 2006 10:29:09 -0800, aem wrote:
    >
    >> It's not traditional but I sometimes sprinkle some cilantro leaves into
    >> my soup bowl when, as now, the cilantro plants are growing well. -aem

    >
    >Cilantro is a good addition to almost anything. :)
    >I particularly like it in vietnamese style grilled chicken sandwiches.
    >--



    I've never found cilantro mentioned in Chinese recipes though.

    It's more a Thai thing
     
  6. pgluth1

    pgluth1 Guest

    Vietnamese sandwiches! OMG - they are good. There were a few places in
    Rockford, Illinois, that used to make those for carry out. Now that I am
    closer to the Chicago burbs, I haven't found any place that makes them. I
    can still remember that on Fridays, this one place sold barbeque pork
    sandwiches on special.

    I remember the first time I went into a little Vietnamese grocery store and
    saw them on sale. The daughter of the owner was loading dozens of these
    into a box for delivery. I remarked to the owner, "funny, I've never seen
    sub sandwiches mixed with Asian food," to which the owner snapped, "I guess
    we learned something from 100 years of French occupation."
     
  7. On Sun, 05 Feb 2006 12:30:32 -0800, sf <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Sun, 05 Feb 2006 13:18:15 -0500, BabyJane Hudson wrote:
    >
    >> Chinese Imperial Palace Egg Drop Soup
    >>

    >I subscribe to CopyKat too.


    I HATE YOUR GUTS! YOU TOLD MY SUCRET!!!

    Just kidding, of course. It is a good source of recipes.

    Happy recipe hunting, my friend,
    BabyJane Hudson

    (Did you see me kill my sister's caretaker in the TV movie? I hit the
    nosey bitch in the head with a hammer!)
     
  8. Please give the ingredient and construction please.

    "pgluth1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Vietnamese sandwiches! OMG - they are good. There were a few places in
    > Rockford, Illinois, that used to make those for carry out. Now that I am
    > closer to the Chicago burbs, I haven't found any place that makes them. I
    > can still remember that on Fridays, this one place sold barbeque pork
    > sandwiches on special.
    >
    > I remember the first time I went into a little Vietnamese grocery store
    > and
    > saw them on sale. The daughter of the owner was loading dozens of these
    > into a box for delivery. I remarked to the owner, "funny, I've never seen
    > sub sandwiches mixed with Asian food," to which the owner snapped, "I
    > guess
    > we learned something from 100 years of French occupation."
    >
     
  9. pgluth1

    pgluth1 Guest

    When it comes to ethnic food, I rarely ask questions. I just ask the
    owner "what's good?" and sit back and enjoy the results. Except for an
    ugly incident in Northern Germany where the specialty of the house was
    "eel sub sandwiches" I haven't regretted the results.

    This is an example of a Vietnamese sandwich. Again, I am not an expert,
    but the ones I had were served on very small french "sub" rolls, maybe 5
    inches long. There was a choice of chicken, pork, bbq beef, and a few
    different vegetarian varieties. They tend to be on the spicy side, served
    cold, and packed with marinaded vegetables.

    http://www.recipezaar.com/126797

    or

    http://www.recipezaar.com/51295

    and pictures at:

    http://www.sacbee.com/content/lifestyle/taste/cookbook/recipes/story/1363
    6412p-14478846c.html#more_images

    I read this:
    Called banh mi in Vietnam, these delicious sandwiches are ubiquitous
    throughout the country and are usually eaten for breakfast.

    But I had heard they are also snacks and appetizers.
     
  10. sf

    sf Guest

    On Mon, 06 Feb 2006 15:01:06 -0500, BabyJane Hudson wrote:

    > On Sun, 05 Feb 2006 12:30:32 -0800, sf <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >On Sun, 05 Feb 2006 13:18:15 -0500, BabyJane Hudson wrote:
    > >
    > >> Chinese Imperial Palace Egg Drop Soup
    > >>

    > >I subscribe to CopyKat too.

    >
    > I HATE YOUR GUTS! YOU TOLD MY SUCRET!!!
    >

    :) BUSTED!
    >
    > Just kidding, of course. It is a good source of recipes.
    >
    > Happy recipe hunting, my friend,
    > BabyJane Hudson
    >
    > (Did you see me kill my sister's caretaker in the TV movie? I hit the
    > nosey bitch in the head with a hammer!)


    You can try the insanity plea, but don't serve any more pets or
    rats.... that's not playing nice.
    --

    Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
     
Loading...