Chocolate roses

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Michael, Jan 6, 2005.

  1. Michael

    Michael Guest

    I wanted to thank everyone who responded to my question
    about problems I had with a recipe I used for white
    modelling chocolate. Here's a link to a picture of my
    first attempts to make roses from modelling chocolate:

    http://www.zspider.com/3d/chocolate_rose.jpg

    http://www.zspider.com/3d/close_up.jpg

    As noted in my post on the subject, the recipe I used
    produced too soft of a medium, and it had a negative
    impact on how thin I could get the petals. The white
    things in the background are white chocolate leaves I
    made by dribbling white chocolate on the backside of
    some real leaves. The roses are a combination of
    white chocolate, corn syrup, and red food paste. In
    taste, they were far superior to the marzipan I used
    to decorate a snowman cake.

    Although it's off-topic, I've also included a picture
    of my daughter and I down in the Red River Gorge in
    Kentucky while taking a break during a climbing trip
    last summer.

    http://www.zspider.com/3d/dadandamber.jpg

    Michael
     
    Tags:


  2. Michael wrote:
    > I wanted to thank everyone who responded to my question
    > about problems I had with a recipe I used for white
    > modelling chocolate. Here's a link to a picture of my
    > first attempts to make roses from modelling chocolate:
    >
    > http://www.zspider.com/3d/chocolate_rose.jpg
    >
    > http://www.zspider.com/3d/close_up.jpg
    >
    > As noted in my post on the subject, the recipe I used
    > produced too soft of a medium, and it had a negative
    > impact on how thin I could get the petals. The white
    > things in the background are white chocolate leaves I
    > made by dribbling white chocolate on the backside of
    > some real leaves. The roses are a combination of
    > white chocolate, corn syrup, and red food paste. In
    > taste, they were far superior to the marzipan I used
    > to decorate a snowman cake.
    >
    > Although it's off-topic, I've also included a picture
    > of my daughter and I down in the Red River Gorge in
    > Kentucky while taking a break during a climbing trip
    > last summer.
    >
    > http://www.zspider.com/3d/dadandamber.jpg
    >
    > Michael
    >

    Nice flowers, pretty daughter. Thank you for sharing these goodies
    with us. Nothing wrong with you, either.

    There is nothing Off-topic about your daughter, she eats food, doesn't
    she? :eek:)
     
  3. Guest

    Cute.......so is your daughter and the roses!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


    "Margaret Suran" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    >
    > Michael wrote:
    >> I wanted to thank everyone who responded to my question
    >> about problems I had with a recipe I used for white
    >> modelling chocolate. Here's a link to a picture of my
    >> first attempts to make roses from modelling chocolate:
    >>
    >> http://www.zspider.com/3d/chocolate_rose.jpg
    >>
    >> http://www.zspider.com/3d/close_up.jpg
    >>
    >> As noted in my post on the subject, the recipe I used
    >> produced too soft of a medium, and it had a negative
    >> impact on how thin I could get the petals. The white
    >> things in the background are white chocolate leaves I
    >> made by dribbling white chocolate on the backside of
    >> some real leaves. The roses are a combination of
    >> white chocolate, corn syrup, and red food paste. In
    >> taste, they were far superior to the marzipan I used
    >> to decorate a snowman cake.
    >>
    >> Although it's off-topic, I've also included a picture
    >> of my daughter and I down in the Red River Gorge in
    >> Kentucky while taking a break during a climbing trip
    >> last summer.
    >>
    >> http://www.zspider.com/3d/dadandamber.jpg
    >>
    >> Michael
    >>

    > Nice flowers, pretty daughter. Thank you for sharing these goodies with
    > us. Nothing wrong with you, either.
    >
    > There is nothing Off-topic about your daughter, she eats food, doesn't
    > she? :eek:)
    >
     
  4. Marge

    Marge Guest

    the roses turned out great. Nice family :)
     
  5. Michael

    Michael Guest

    Thanks for all the kind comments! The roses were less than perfect
    but it was my first time so I didn't mind. I never dreamed there were
    so many media for decorating a cake! I've sampled marzipan and
    modelling chocolate. Now I'm looking at rolled fondant and flower-
    paste. I stopped by a cake shop in town today and picked up some
    just-add-water flowerpaste (making it from scratch requires really
    weird ingredients like tragacanth and glucose). The lady at the cake
    store is kind of disappointing. I don't know if she is the owner or
    not, but she only knows buttercream, and nothing about any of the
    other things.

    Michael
     
  6. Michael

    Michael Guest

    Thanks for all the kind comments! The roses were less than perfect
    but it was my first time so I didn't mind. I never dreamed there were
    so many media for decorating a cake! I've sampled marzipan and
    modelling chocolate. Now I'm looking at rolled fondant and flower-
    paste. I stopped by a cake shop in town today and picked up some
    just-add-water flowerpaste (making it from scratch requires really
    weird ingredients like tragacanth and glucose). The lady at the cake
    store is kind of disappointing. I don't know if she is the owner or
    not, but she only knows buttercream, and nothing about any of the
    other things.

    Michael
     
  7. Playrite1

    Playrite1 Guest

    Michael
    the chocolate flowers are beautiful! What was the recipe for them?
    Susan
     
  8. Michael

    Michael Guest

    Susan wrote:

    the chocolate flowers are beautiful! What was the recipe for them?

    ****************
    The recipe I worked with asked for a ratio of 10 oz (by weight) of
    white chocolate to 4 oz (liquid) corn syrup. I was experimenting so
    I cut it down to a fourth. It amounted to way too much corn syrup,
    and was oily and soft. I kneaded it and got my hands greasy and
    wiped them off and continued till it wasn't too oily, but it stayed
    soft,
    and the rose petals suffered for it by disintegrating if I worked them
    as thin as I wanted them to be. I have not tried any of the recipes
    yet that the people here recommended to fix it, but I'm thinking 10
    oz white chocolate to 1 or 2 oz corn syrup. I used a red food paste
    to color it. A little bit does the trick. No way you could use just
    plain food coloring, I think. Way too watery.

    Put it in the fridge for an hour, then roll it out between two sheets
    of wax paper. Roll up a little strip for the bud in the center, and
    then cut petals and mash them to the base.

    There are other ways to do roses, too. You can make them out
    of plain old cake icing by squirting them out of a decorating bag
    with an appropriate tip.

    Michael
     
  9. d

    d Guest

    You're off to a great start! Pretty good for a first timer.

    When you are ready for gumpaste/flower paste, send me an email and I'll help
    you the best I can. I've written several tutorials for friends on different
    gumpaste flowers.

    I uploaded some pictures of some of the stuff I've done. Have a look if
    you're interested.
    http://community.webshots.com/user/donneigh

    Keep it up! You'll get better and better with practice.

    -d
    d[dot]neighoff[at]verizon[dot]net

    "Michael" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I wanted to thank everyone who responded to my question
    > about problems I had with a recipe I used for white
    > modelling chocolate. Here's a link to a picture of my
    > first attempts to make roses from modelling chocolate:
    >
    > http://www.zspider.com/3d/chocolate_rose.jpg
    >
    > http://www.zspider.com/3d/close_up.jpg
    >
    > As noted in my post on the subject, the recipe I used
    > produced too soft of a medium, and it had a negative
    > impact on how thin I could get the petals. The white
    > things in the background are white chocolate leaves I
    > made by dribbling white chocolate on the backside of
    > some real leaves. The roses are a combination of
    > white chocolate, corn syrup, and red food paste. In
    > taste, they were far superior to the marzipan I used
    > to decorate a snowman cake.
    >
    > Although it's off-topic, I've also included a picture
    > of my daughter and I down in the Red River Gorge in
    > Kentucky while taking a break during a climbing trip
    > last summer.
    >
    > http://www.zspider.com/3d/dadandamber.jpg
    >
    > Michael
    >
     
  10. Michael

    Michael Guest

    d wrote:

    I uploaded some pictures of some of the stuff I've done. Have a look if

    you're interested.
    http://community.webshots.com/user/donneigh

    *********************
    Whoa! You made all those? They are absolutely breathtaking! The
    flowers are beautiful by themselves. The watch looked spectacular.
    Right now I'm just gathering information. Yesterday I sat for a couple
    hours at Borders bookstore reading about it. There was one book on
    making gumpaste orchids that I paid special attention to. I wrote
    down the procedures for basic handling of gumpaste. The book said
    to have egg whites, shortening, and cornstarch at hand. If the gum-
    paste was dry, it said to wipe it with egg white, if too sticky to put
    a
    thin film of shortening on my hands. It said to coat the surface that
    the gumpaste is to be worked with shortening and then wipe the
    excess off with a paper towel. One thing I found confusing. Bouncing
    between different books, one said to spread a little powdered sugar
    on the working surface, and another said absolutely not, to use corn
    starch instead.

    The orchid book said to color the flowers with powders, but I don't
    find
    them for sale anywhere, even the online specialty stores like Wilton's.

    I also eyed the various tools that are used, like the tiny white
    rolling
    pins, and the stylus-type shaping tools. I notice that Wilton has a
    beginner kit for around $20. I wonder if that would be a good bet.

    I have about a billion questions! Thank you for your offer to help me!

    I will email you. I bought some powdered gumpaste from the cake
    store. I think I am about a week or two away from attempting some-
    thing. I first want to try decorating a cake with a simple rolled
    fondant and some more modelling chocolate. I saw a very striking
    design using an eggshell fondant shell decorated with a combination
    of dark and white chocolate clay in a Collette Peters book that I'd
    like to try. That will be my first exposure to rolled fondant.
    Thank you, Michael
     
  11. d

    d Guest

    "Michael" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >d wrote:
    >
    > I uploaded some pictures of some of the stuff I've done. Have a look if
    >
    > you're interested.
    > http://community.webshots.com/user/donneigh
    >
    > *********************
    > Whoa! You made all those? They are absolutely breathtaking! The
    > flowers are beautiful by themselves. The watch looked spectacular.
    > Right now I'm just gathering information. Yesterday I sat for a couple


    Yep, made them all. Thank you! I cheated on the watch though, I made a mold
    of my husbands watch using stuff called Elastack.. it's great stuff and food
    grade too. The molds made from this stuff can be used for gumpaste, fondant
    or chocolate. A friend saw it used on an episode of Food Tv and told me
    about it.... she just couldn't remember which show, just that product.


    > hours at Borders bookstore reading about it. There was one book on
    > making gumpaste orchids that I paid special attention to. I wrote
    > down the procedures for basic handling of gumpaste. The book said
    > to have egg whites, shortening, and cornstarch at hand. If the gum-
    > paste was dry, it said to wipe it with egg white, if too sticky to put
    > a
    > thin film of shortening on my hands. It said to coat the surface that
    > the gumpaste is to be worked with shortening and then wipe the
    > excess off with a paper towel. One thing I found confusing. Bouncing
    > between different books, one said to spread a little powdered sugar
    > on the working surface, and another said absolutely not, to use corn
    > starch instead.


    That info was correct, sort of. It all depends on you and the weather. I
    work with very little cornstarch and/or shortening. The only time I work
    with powdered sugar is when I'm rolling out fondant. On dry days, when the
    paste is drying out too fast, I work with more shortening than I normally do
    just to keep the paste from drying out. I have hot hands so I had to learn
    to work fast or my hands would literally melt the paste so that helps me on
    dry days when the paste drys out faster.

    >
    > The orchid book said to color the flowers with powders, but I don't
    > find
    > them for sale anywhere,


    Was that Sugar Orchids by Alan Dunn? It's a very good book and he's an
    excellent sugar artist. The orchid that I made was from that book. The dusts
    can be bought from many sources online. Most brick and mortars don't carry
    it. It took a long time to get my local cake shop to carry them and now they
    have just about every color that CK Products sells.

    Here's a few that sell the dusts:
    www.globalsugarart.com They sell a wide variety of gumpaste tools and the
    dusts you are looking for. Right now they are having a sale on some things
    and if you buy 50.00 or more you get 15% off your total.

    www.countrykitchensa.com This place sells just about everything from CK
    Products... I think the owners of those places are related or something

    www.nicholaslodge.com He sells pretty much the same stuff as Global Sugar
    Art but he does have some of his own stuff that he designed such as cutters
    and veiners. He also has videos that are reasonably priced. I have most of
    the videos and they are very good. The only problem is that his prices on
    everything else is kind of high

    www.celcrafts.co.uk I used to order from this place a lot, until the dollar
    dropped. Still, it's cheaper to buy things like the celBoards and celPins
    from them instead of buying them in the US. They also have a few other
    things that can't be bought online or locally from any US store.


    even the online specialty stores like Wilton's.
    >
    > I also eyed the various tools that are used, like the tiny white
    > rolling
    > pins, and the stylus-type shaping tools. I notice that Wilton has a
    > beginner kit for around $20. I wonder if that would be a good bet.


    I have that pin from Wilton and when I roll my paste out with it, there are
    a bunch of tiny lines in the paste. It doesn't roll as smooth as the celPins
    but the end product doesn't show the tiny lines very much. It should work
    very well for you, at least for a while.
    >
    > I have about a billion questions! Thank you for your offer to help me!
    >
    > I will email you. I bought some powdered gumpaste from the cake
    > store. I think I am about a week or two away from attempting some-
    > thing.


    Looking forward to the email, I'm always happy to help.

    I first want to try decorating a cake with a simple rolled
    > fondant and some more modelling chocolate. I saw a very striking
    > design using an eggshell fondant shell decorated with a combination
    > of dark and white chocolate clay in a Collette Peters book that I'd
    > like to try. That will be my first exposure to rolled fondant.
    > Thank you, Michael
    >


    Good luck with the fondant cake. Looking forward to seeing how the cake
    turns out. Just keep practicing!

    Oh, and try your local library for some of these types of books. If your
    local branch doesn't have them, see if any other branches has them.
    -d
     
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