Choice of footwear ?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Bob H, Sep 20, 2004.

  1. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Arthur Clune wrote:
    > David Martin <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > : It depends on your definition of 'reasonably smooth'.. I'd go for the
    > : 'smooth enough to ride a bicycle along in both directions' and that is most
    > : certainly not suitable for playing billiards.
    >
    > My trip involved lots of stuff unridable on a mtb. While carrying tent etc


    Trainers only become a problem if you're on stuff that's rough in the
    ~5-10 cm waveband, as the soft sole will conform and your feet will be
    uncomfortable after a lot of contorting, and there's nothing big enough
    to be a full platform. But rough in bigger wavelengths isn't a problem
    as you can stand flat on it. Aside from pebble beaches and some scree
    slops, there's not actually /that/ much that's a problem.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     


  2. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Arthur Clune
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > Simon Brooke <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > : The answer to that is 'bogs'. I may still be the only person to have
    > : cycled across the Silver Flow, although I should think that by now
    > : at
    >
    > Where's that then? I'm assuming the north-east of Scotland (flow
    > country)?


    Between the Rhinns of Kells and the Dungeon of Buchan, south of
    Mulwarchar; North of the Rigg of the Jarkness and west of the Backhill
    o' the Bush; leading up to the Wolf's Slock. Or here
    <URL:http://tinyurl.com/67v7p> for you Sassenach.

    We have some excellent placenames in Galloway.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; I'd rather live in sybar-space
     
  3. On Tue, 21 Sep 2004 09:08:40 +0100, Peter Clinch wrote:

    > Bob H wrote:
    >> Anyone else wear walking boots for cycling in ? ;-)

    >
    > No. It's quite rare for me to even go walking in walking boots any
    > more, unless I can see crampon use or step kicking in my immediate
    > future.


    There are sandals with SPD cleats of course.

    Only Peter Clinch could have a use for placcy boots with
    SPD cleats.
     
  4. Paulmouk

    Paulmouk Guest

    "Bob H" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Anyone else wear walking boots for cycling in ? ;-)
    >
    > I tend to wear old knackered pairs, that are nice and supple, but with a

    good shank.
    >
    > This is their penultimate use before garden duty.



    I wear thick leather walking boots for commuting in the winter.
    They are warm and waterproof and support and protect the ankles when
    walking. The tread design is good on snow and (rough) ice.

    Paul.
     
  5. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    ScumOfTheRoad wrote:

    > Only Peter Clinch could have a use for placcy boots with
    > SPD cleats.


    I would have no use for such things...

    > There are sandals with SPD cleats of course.


    Shimano SD-60s being Exhibit A, and far and away my favourite cycling
    footwear. They don't mix too well with rocky tracks though.

    Unfortunately I can't find a pair of sandals that will clip into SNS
    track ski bindings... ;-/

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  6. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Paulmouk wrote:
    >
    > I wear thick leather walking boots for commuting in the winter.
    > They are warm and waterproof and support and protect the ankles when
    > walking.


    Why do your ankles /need/ extra support than the generally completely
    adequate support your muscles and tendons already give them? What
    exactly are you protecting them /from/?
    If ankles were really that pathetic we'd have died out tens or hundreds
    of thousands of years ago, before we had the tools to make boots with
    high ankle cuffs and transport other than walking...

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  7. >Why do your ankles /need/ extra support than the generally completely
    >adequate support your muscles and tendons already give them? What
    >exactly are you protecting them /from/?
    >If ankles were really that pathetic we'd have died out tens or hundreds
    >of thousands of years ago, before we had the tools to make boots with
    >high ankle cuffs and transport other than walking...


    Some of us have weak ankles - no joke. My left ankle has been broken and I've
    damaged the ligaments in it. Now I am left with reduced mobility and weakness
    in it. In the cold,damp weather it *aches* quite nastily. If I am going to be
    walking any sort of distance (over about a mile) then I need my walking boots
    for support. Good job this isn't a few millenia ago, Pete, or I'd have been
    prey before now ;-)

    Cheers, helen s


    --This is an invalid email address to avoid spam--
    to get correct one remove fame & fortune
    h*$el*$$e*nd**$o$ts**i*$*$m*m$o*n*[email protected]$*a$o*l.c**$om$

    --Due to financial crisis the light at the end of the tunnel is switched off--
     
  8. Doki

    Doki Guest

    Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:
    > Nick Kew wrote:
    >
    >> Bah. What's wrong with that nice allrounder-footwear, the trainer?
    >> Serves well both on the bike and on foot.

    >
    > The soles are too thick to work well with toeclips or cups, and not
    > stiff enough to prevent painful arches when riding briskly.


    Skate trainers work well IME. Stiffer soles than normal trainers though.
     
  9. Paulmouk

    Paulmouk Guest

    "Peter Clinch" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Paulmouk wrote:
    > >
    > > I wear thick leather walking boots for commuting in the winter.
    > > They are warm and waterproof and support and protect the ankles when
    > > walking.

    >
    > Why do your ankles /need/ extra support than the generally completely
    > adequate support your muscles and tendons already give them? What
    > exactly are you protecting them /from/?
    > If ankles were really that pathetic we'd have died out tens or hundreds
    > of thousands of years ago, before we had the tools to make boots with
    > high ankle cuffs and transport other than walking...
    >
    > Pete.


    I am slightly weak on one side of my body (meningitis many years ago). Have
    a tendency for one foot to turn over and it hurts like hell. I am referring
    to icy, wet and slushy conditions.
    However, having said that, plenty of people think that thick leather boots
    are very warm.
    Modern boots are very supple and comfortable.
    I have SPD on the audax and mountain bikes but have flat/SPD on the commuter
    so I can choose my footwear depending on conditions.
    9pm on a dry January night they can also be good. I can only get so many
    socks on with my cycling shoes.
    Paul
     
  10. the.Mark

    the.Mark Guest

    Simon Brooke wrote:
    > > The answer to that is 'bogs'. I may still be the only person

    > to have cycled across the Silver Flow, although I should think
    > that by now at least one other person must have been stupid
    > enough. But any mountain biking expedition of any length
    > involves more minor bogs, and if putting feet down in bogs
    > stout waterproof footwear is a good thing.
    >

    A silly idea I tried once was to put my Yeti gaters on my Cannondale cycle
    shoes. It actually worked but I don't think I'll use them on the bike as I
    find that even on a cold day my legs get quite hot in them. I only really
    appreciate the gaiters when I'm out on the hills in deep snow.
    --
    Mark

    1x1 wheel, 3x2 wheels & 1x3 wheels.
     
  11. the.Mark

    the.Mark Guest

    Simon Brooke wrote:
    >
    >
    > Between the Rhinns of Kells and the Dungeon of Buchan, south of
    > Mulwarchar; North of the Rigg of the Jarkness and west of the
    > Backhill o' the Bush; leading up to the Wolf's Slock. Or here
    > <URL:http://tinyurl.com/67v7p> for you Sassenach.
    >
    > We have some excellent placenames in Galloway.


    That sounds a bit like something J.R.R. Tolkein would write.
    --
    Mark

    1x1 wheel, 3x2 wheels & 1x3 wheels.
     
  12. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, the.Mark
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > Simon Brooke wrote:
    >>
    >> Between the Rhinns of Kells and the Dungeon of Buchan, south of
    >> Mulwarchar; North of the Rigg of the Jarkness and west of the
    >> Backhill o' the Bush; leading up to the Wolf's Slock. Or here
    >> <URL:http://tinyurl.com/67v7p> for you Sassenach.
    >>
    >> We have some excellent placenames in Galloway.

    >
    > That sounds a bit like something J.R.R. Tolkein would write.


    It looks like somewhere J.R.R. Tolkien would write about. Serious
    wilderness, where the Dunedain may yet battle with orcs to this day.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; Women are from Venus. Men are from Mars. Lusers are from Uranus.
     
  13. the.Mark

    the.Mark Guest

    Simon Brooke wrote:
    > in message <[email protected]>, the.Mark
    > ('[email protected]') wrote:
    >
    >> Simon Brooke wrote:
    >>>
    >>> Between the Rhinns of Kells and the Dungeon of Buchan, south
    >>> of Mulwarchar; North of the Rigg of the Jarkness and west of
    >>> the Backhill o' the Bush; leading up to the Wolf's Slock. Or
    >>> here <URL:http://tinyurl.com/67v7p> for you Sassenach.
    >>>
    >>> We have some excellent placenames in Galloway.

    >>
    >> That sounds a bit like something J.R.R. Tolkein would write.

    >
    > It looks like somewhere J.R.R. Tolkien would write about.
    > Serious wilderness, where the Dunedain may yet battle with
    > orcs to this day.


    I'll have to cycle there sometime. It sounds interesting. I'll bring the
    Dwarf on her rockhopper with 24 inch wheels. :)
    --
    Mark

    1x1 wheel, 3x2 wheels & 1x3 wheels.
     
  14. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, the.Mark
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > Simon Brooke wrote:
    >> in message <[email protected]>, the.Mark
    >> ('[email protected]') wrote:
    >>
    >>> Simon Brooke wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>> Between the Rhinns of Kells and the Dungeon of Buchan, south
    >>>> of Mulwarchar; North of the Rigg of the Jarkness and west of
    >>>> the Backhill o' the Bush; leading up to the Wolf's Slock. Or
    >>>> here <URL:http://tinyurl.com/67v7p> for you Sassenach.
    >>>>
    >>>> We have some excellent placenames in Galloway.
    >>>
    >>> That sounds a bit like something J.R.R. Tolkein would write.

    >>
    >> It looks like somewhere J.R.R. Tolkien would write about.
    >> Serious wilderness, where the Dunedain may yet battle with
    >> orcs to this day.

    >
    > I'll have to cycle there sometime. It sounds interesting. I'll bring
    > the Dwarf on her rockhopper with 24 inch wheels. :)


    Does she not read this group, and are you hoping we won't tell her?

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
    ,/| _.--''^``-...___.._.,;
    /, \'. _-' ,--,,,--'''
    { \ `_-'' ' /
    `;;' ; ; ;
    ._..--'' ._,,, _..' .;.'
    (,_....----''' (,..--''
     
  15. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    dirtylitterboxofferingstospammers wrote:

    > Some of us have weak ankles - no joke.


    Yes, and that's why I originally qualified my opinion with "unless you
    have weak ankles".

    However, most walkers use boots because, well, that's what walkers use.
    In many, I think probably the majority of cases, they're carrying
    extra weight and restricting foot movement for no real benefit.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  16. the.Mark

    the.Mark Guest

    Simon Brooke wrote:
    > in message <[email protected]>, the.Mark
    > ('[email protected]') wrote:
    >
    >> Simon Brooke wrote:
    >>> in message <[email protected]>, the.Mark
    >>> ('[email protected]') wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Simon Brooke wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Between the Rhinns of Kells and the Dungeon of Buchan,
    >>>>> south of Mulwarchar; North of the Rigg of the Jarkness and
    >>>>> west of the Backhill o' the Bush; leading up to the Wolf's
    >>>>> Slock. Or here <URL:http://tinyurl.com/67v7p> for you
    >>>>> Sassenach.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> We have some excellent placenames in Galloway.
    >>>>
    >>>> That sounds a bit like something J.R.R. Tolkein would write.
    >>>
    >>> It looks like somewhere J.R.R. Tolkien would write about.
    >>> Serious wilderness, where the Dunedain may yet battle with
    >>> orcs to this day.

    >>
    >> I'll have to cycle there sometime. It sounds interesting.
    >> I'll bring the Dwarf on her rockhopper with 24 inch wheels.
    >> :)

    >
    > Does she not read this group, and are you hoping we won't tell
    > her?

    She only reads it over my shoulder and when I tell her about something
    amusing or interesting. It was her idea to say I would bring the dwarf.
    --
    Mark

    1x1 wheel, 3x2 wheels & 1x3 wheels.
     
  17. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, the.Mark
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > Simon Brooke wrote:
    >> in message <[email protected]>, the.Mark
    >> ('[email protected]') wrote:
    >>
    >>> Simon Brooke wrote:
    >>>> in message <[email protected]>, the.Mark
    >>>> ('[email protected]') wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Simon Brooke wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Between the Rhinns of Kells and the Dungeon of Buchan,
    >>>>>> south of Mulwarchar; North of the Rigg of the Jarkness and
    >>>>>> west of the Backhill o' the Bush; leading up to the Wolf's
    >>>>>> Slock. Or here <URL:http://tinyurl.com/67v7p> for you
    >>>>>> Sassenach.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> We have some excellent placenames in Galloway.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> That sounds a bit like something J.R.R. Tolkein would write.
    >>>>
    >>>> It looks like somewhere J.R.R. Tolkien would write about.
    >>>> Serious wilderness, where the Dunedain may yet battle with
    >>>> orcs to this day.
    >>>
    >>> I'll have to cycle there sometime. It sounds interesting.
    >>> I'll bring the Dwarf on her rockhopper with 24 inch wheels.
    >>> :)

    >>
    >> Does she not read this group, and are you hoping we won't tell
    >> her?

    > She only reads it over my shoulder and when I tell her about something
    > amusing or interesting. It was her idea to say I would bring the
    > dwarf.


    Well, we're talking about doing a ride down the ridge of the Rhinns of
    Kells sometime in Spring, if you're interested I'll drop you a note of
    when.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
    ;; Generally Not Used
    ;; Except by Middle Aged Computer Scientists
     
  18. the.Mark

    the.Mark Guest

    Simon Brooke wrote:
    >
    > Well, we're talking about doing a ride down the ridge of the
    > Rhinns of Kells sometime in Spring, if you're interested I'll
    > drop you a note of when.


    It sounds like fun. We have been thinking of cycling some routes further
    away from home.
    What sort of route is it? How far?
    --
    Mark

    1x1 wheel, 3x2 wheels & 1x3 wheels.
     
  19. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, the.Mark
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > Simon Brooke wrote:
    >>
    >> Well, we're talking about doing a ride down the ridge of the
    >> Rhinns of Kells sometime in Spring, if you're interested I'll
    >> drop you a note of when.

    >
    > It sounds like fun. We have been thinking of cycling some routes
    > further away from home.
    > What sort of route is it? How far?


    It'll be between fifteen and twenty miles all told. The ridge is very
    steep sided, but the idea is to access from Carsphairn up a forest road
    which means that the uncyclable bit of the climb will be limited to
    probably less than half a mile. Once on the ridge it's high but
    rolling, well drained and with short turf. Coming down off the ridge
    will also be interesting because there is no gentle slope down, but we
    ought to find a route that's doable.

    Fifteen miles may not sound much but it will be a sturdy ride, and
    weather on the top is an issue.

    I've cycled in to the base of the climb before now more than once, and
    I've walked the whole route, but I've never ridden it.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; If you're doing this for fun, do what seems fun. If you're
    ;; doing it for money, stop now.
    ;; Rainer Deyke
     
  20. RJ Webb

    RJ Webb Guest


    >Fifteen miles may not sound much but it will be a sturdy ride, and
    >weather on the top is an issue.
    >



    Fortunately for the hill, getting up to it through all the tussocks
    and sitka is hellish, even without a bike.. so I expect you will be
    pioneering.

    The Harvey map is a good idea, it shows the rides....

    Great ridge and pretty well unmarked.

    Richard Webb
     
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