choice of spokes on rear wheel

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by John S, Apr 10, 2003.

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  1. John S

    John S Guest

    I'm building a 28H AC hub with open pro mavics and can't decide on which spokes to use. I weigh 160
    lbs and debating between 14-17, 15-16 or 14-15 spokes. Any suggestions appreciated.

    Thanks, John
     
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  2. Harris

    Harris Guest

    John S <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I'm building a 28H AC hub with open pro mavics and can't decide on which spokes to use. I weigh
    > 160 lbs and debating between 14-17, 15-16 or 14-15 spokes. Any suggestions appreciated.

    I would run 14-15 on the right, 15-16 on the left. But why only 28 spokes? 32 would give a more
    reliable wheel with almost no weight penalty.

    Art Harris
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    >
    >I'm building a 28H AC hub with open pro mavics and can't decide on which spokes to use. I weigh 160
    >lbs and debating between 14-17, 15-16 or 14-15 spokes. Any suggestions appreciated.

    I run 15/16 on all my wheels. No problems at all.
    -----------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
  4. Bluto

    Bluto Guest

    [email protected] (John S) wrote:

    > I'm building a 28H AC hub with open pro mavics and can't decide on which spokes to use. I weigh
    > 160 lbs and debating between 14-17, 15-16 or 14-15 spokes.

    Use 14-15 on the right side. The left ideally should be lighter gauge for more elastic range. I have
    had no problems to date with DT Revolutions in 14-17 and 15-17 gauges when used on the left side of
    a dished wheel. It's a little easier to build with the 15-17 kind because they lace freer and don't
    seem to wind up as much. If you are not an experienced wheelbuilder, 15-16ga spokes are more
    forgiving than either one.

    Do you have your hub and rim already? If not, I recommend a higher spoke count. 36 spokes work great
    for a 700c wheel, giving about the same spoke density as a 26" wheel with 32 spokes, or a 20" wheel
    with 24 spokes. Use one gauge thinner on the spokes if you are phobic about the weight; your wheel
    will weigh the same or less and be stronger and more repairable. Use a reduced spoke count on the
    front if you must-- it's not nearly as much harm there.

    Chalo Colina
     
  5. mcgyver-<< I'm building a 28H AC hub with open pro mavics and can't decide on which spokes to use. I
    weigh 160 lbs and debating between 14-17, 15-16 or 14-15 spokes. Any suggestions appreciated.

    14/15 laced three cross with the spokes oriented headout or inside pulling, to minimize the spoke
    bend at the flange.

    With Revs, think you are gonna be truing this a lot-

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (15)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  6. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    I actually ride such a set with Record hubs. I used 14/15 on the drive side x3 and straight 15 ga
    elsewhere x2. I weigh 200 lbs and haven't had to play with them at all.

    On 11 Apr 2003 13:42:22 GMT, [email protected] (Qui si parla Campagnolo) wrote:

    >mcgyver-<< I'm building a 28H AC hub with open pro mavics and can't decide on which spokes to use.
    >I weigh 160 lbs and debating between 14-17, 15-16 or 14-15 spokes. Any suggestions appr
     
  7. Qui si parla Campagnolo wrote:
    > mcgyver-<< I'm building a 28H AC hub with open pro mavics and can't decide on which spokes to use.
    > I weigh 160 lbs and debating between 14-17, 15-16 or 14-15 spokes. Any suggestions appreciated.
    >
    > 14/15 laced three cross with the spokes oriented headout or inside pulling, to minimize the spoke
    > bend at the flange.
    >
    > With Revs, think you are gonna be truing this a lot-

    Why? Since DT Revolution spokes are more elastic, they are less likely to completely slacken in use,
    and therefore less likely to unscrew.

    Mark McMaster [email protected]
     
  8. Terry Morse

    Terry Morse Guest

    Peter Chisolm wrote:

    > Mark-<< Why? Since DT Revolution spokes are more elastic, they are less likely to completely
    > slacken in use, and therefore less likely to unscrew.
    >
    > Nothing to do with 'unscrewing', don't think they are strong enough to support the rim on the
    > rear. Normal riding will 'deform' the rim more than if supported by a more robust spoke.

    Do you mean the DT Revolution spokes are so thin that they can't produce enough tension to build a
    wheel (100 kgf +/-)? That's an awful thought. I've heard that thin spokes make a difficult build
    because of wind-up, but I didn't think they were too weak to support the rim.
    --
    terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://www.terrymorse.com/bike/
     
  9. Qui si parla Campagnolo wrote:
    > Mark-<< Why? Since DT Revolution spokes are more elastic, they are less likely to completely
    > slacken in use, and therefore less likely to unscrew.
    >
    > Nothing to do with 'unscrewing', don't think they are strong enough to support the rim on the
    > rear. Normal riding will 'deform' the rim more than if supported by a more robust spoke.

    You say that like it is a bad thing, when it is actually a good thing. If the spokes are more
    elastic, the rim will fill flex over a wider area, distributing the load over a larger number of
    spokes. This in turn decreases the load cycle on both the individual spokes, and on the parts of the
    rim supported by the spokes.

    Don't worry that any additional rim flex allowed by the more elastic spokes will all the rim to be
    permanently dented - the elastic range of the spokes (of any diameter) is far less than the elastic
    range of the rim.

    In my experience, the more elastic the spokes (i.e. the thinner), the longer the wheel will
    stay in true.

    Now, fighting the wind-up problems in getting highly butted spokes (DT Revolutions, Wheelsmith
    XL14s) up to sufficient tension is another issue all together ...

    Mark McMaster [email protected]
     
  10. Nick Payne

    Nick Payne Guest

    I've built a couple of tandem rear wheels for racing using Sapim CX-Ray spokes, which have even less
    cross-sectional area in the mid-section than the 1.5mm DT Revolution spokes, and not had problems
    with either of them over several thousand km (32 spoke front, 40 spoke rear). If those wheels can
    take the stresses of two riders sprinting, I can't see any problems with using DT Revolution spokes
    on the rear for a bike with only one rider. In fact that's what the wheels on my own race bike are -
    32h DT Revolution front and rear with four seasons on them so far.

    Nick

    "Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Mark-<< Why? Since DT Revolution spokes are more elastic, they are less likely to completely
    > slacken in use, and therefore less likely to unscrew.
    >
    > Nothing to do with 'unscrewing', don't think they are strong enough to
    support
    > the rim on the rear. Normal riding will 'deform' the rim more than if
    supported
    > by a more robust spoke.
     
  11. Bikefixr

    Bikefixr Guest

    Having built something like 3000 sets of wheels-I'd recommend the following.

    Drive side 14g with brass nipples, 3 cross. Left side 15/17 with alloy nipples in 3 cross or a
    radial pattern. Either works as well as the other. I like 14g drive for a couple reasons. It saves
    about $12, that's good. I like the meatier elbow by the head vs a 15g. That's good. I also see too
    many derailleurs shift the chain over the top of 1st gear and into the space between the 1st cog and
    hub flange tearing up spokes. Having that extra might mean the difference of a torn spoke or not,
    and the weight differential between a 14g and a 14/15 is a few grams.
     
  12. bikefixr-<< Drive side 14g with brass nipples, 3 cross. Left side 15/17 with alloy nipples in 3
    cross or a radial pattern. Either works as well as the other

    Why not 14/15 all around, three cross?

    << I like 14g drive for a couple reasons. It saves about $12, that's good.

    But using Revs on the left adds $$-the result is about the same as 14/15-32 spokes. And when using
    only 16 14g spokes, you only save about $6, then add it back with Revs.

    << I like the meatier elbow by the head vs a 15g

    14/15 has the same elbow as 14g...

    << I also see too many derailleurs shift the chain over the top of 1st gear and into the space
    between the 1st cog and hub flange tearing up spokes.

    Guess I don't see your logic when compared to a 32 spoke, three cross, 14/15 and brass nipps. Using
    mixed gauges(14g) thin left side spokes and alloy nipps...what problem does this solve?

    Not reliability, nor weight, nor $$. Does make spoke inventory a real pain tho-

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (15)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
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