Choosing a bike, any opinions?

Discussion in 'Bike buying advice' started by crashnburn, Jun 1, 2010.

  1. crashnburn

    crashnburn New Member

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    I'm new to cycling and I've decided to start with a fast hybrid before I progress into something more. Through the research I've done I've narrowed it down to the few below. I'll mainly be riding for fitness and riding with the family. Also, on longer rides with friends. I've heard good this about the Trek but its' one that does not have disc brakes. How important is it to go with disc brakes when I see a lot of road bikes without them? Any advise or opinions from some of you experienced riders would be appreciated. Thanks.

    1) Trek 7.6 FX or 7.7 FX
    2) Fisher Mendota
    3) Cannondale Bad Boy Solo
    4) Cannondale Quick CX Ultra
     
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  2. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    Rather than a Hybrid (I 'love' Hybrids with rigid forks, BTW), I recommend that you consider the JAMIS CODA:


    [​IMG]


    2010 JAMIS BICYCLES - SPECIFICATIONS

    The MSRP for the base model is only $550.

    N.B. Most-if-not-all current year bikes in inventory should be going on sale on July 1st if they have not already been placed on sale ... they essentially become NOS as dealers need to clear floor space for the 2011 bikes which will be hitting their show room floors in September.

    You don't need disc brakes for riding on pavement unless you are an all-weather commuter who lives in Seattle-or-similar-environs.

    If any of the bikes you've listed have a suspension fork, then scratch them off your list. Suspension forks, particularly inexpensive suspension forks (e.g., RST) make the handling clumsy. WHY PAY A PREMIUM TO MAKE THE BIKE HANDLE POORLY?
     
  3. crashnburn

    crashnburn New Member

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    Thanks alfeng. After looking at some models today I think I'm leaning towards the 7.6 FX which is a rigid and is lighter than the others. I looked at the upper Coda models and now I'm wondering what's the difference between that and their Allegro models.
     
  4. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    A cursory (and, only a cursory) glance suggests that the most significant difference between the base models of the CODA & ALLEGRO is that the CODA has a steel frame & the ALLEGRO has an aluminum frame.

    Further observation suggests that the ALLEGRO appears to be more "comfort" oriented with a taller head tube & subsequently a higher stem/handlebar placement relative to the CODA.

    Apparently, JAMIS (as do I) considers the CODA to be the bike for slightly more serious riders ... and, as I indicated, I think the CODA can be converted to use for CX whereas the ALLEGRO does not lend itself to DROP handlebars ...

    That doesn't mean that the ALLEGRO (or, a bike with similar geometry) might not be the right bike for you, or someone else who may be reading this thread ... it really depends on the rider's fitness level AND where s/he plans to ride.

    The CODA appears to have Shimano components while the ALLEGRO has SRAM components. Other than cassettes & chains, I would not be inclined to using SRAM components on 'my' bikes ... but, some people love SRAM "stuff" ...

    I'm not going to look at the specs for the other bikes, so you'll have to do a bike-by-bike comparison if they truly really interest you ...

    But, I will say that sight unseen, of the other bikes, I would rather have the one with the FISHER decal on the downtube even if it isn't truly any different from the TREK. I would generally shy away from either CANNONDALE (which makes some really nice bikes) just because they have a tendancy to incorporate odd-ball specs (aka "proprietary") which means proprietary components on their bikes and I would rather not deal with tracking down "orphan" components in the future -- the Headshok is a fine example of interesting -- but, "I'll pass on that" -- technology brought to the cycling world by the engineers at Cannodale.
     
  5. cheney119

    cheney119 New Member

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    I have a Giant Nutra hybrid that I got for nearly nothing. It's only 6 speed freewheel so it's pretty old. I ride it in the rain and winter, it has full fenders, a rack and trunk bag to carry rain gear.

    I broke the frame and had it welded, even put a new crank, chain, and rear derailluer on it. You need barends of some kind so you have more than one hand location, but other than that I just ride it. I don't go much farther than 25 miles, farther I go a little lighter and lower than this HIGHbrid, upright position.

    Funny thing is in is only a couple mph slower than expensive race bikes I own. It fits me very well and that's always what I've like about her.

    If it breaks again I'll probably just abandon it then, but that will make me sad.
     
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