Christmas dinner for two?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Karen AKA Kajikit, Dec 20, 2005.

  1. I HAD planned to make my family's traditional steamed christmas
    pudding but I haven't been able to find a suitable bowl for steaming
    it... and I'd also planned to roast a turkey breast but the store only
    had legs (Ugh), wings (even more ugh) and whole birds... so it looks
    like that's out too :(

    What would you make for a christmas dinner just for two people...

    I bought a thick slice of leg ham and we might have that... so how do
    I prepare it?


    --
    ~Karen aka Kajikit
    Crafts, cats, and chocolate - the three essentials of life
    http://www.kajikitscorner.com
    Online photo album - http://community.webshots.com/user/kajikit
     
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  2. jacqui{JB}

    jacqui{JB} Guest

    "Karen AKA Kajikit" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > What would you make for a christmas dinner just
    > for two people...


    For Christmas Eve (the big celebration here), we're having duck -- duck
    breasts, to be exact, with some sort of port sauce, an onion and dried
    cherry confit to go with it, wild rice pancakes, green salad with sauted
    mushrooms, and probably traditional Danish rice a l'almond (cold rice
    porridge mixed with whipped cream and slivered almonds, served with cherry
    sauce -- it's nice) or maybe brandied figs with whipped cream. Probably no
    starter. Nothing too taxing. :)

    We have family coming on the 26th, and we'll have brasied short ribs, mashed
    potatoes, salad, and probably an apple cake. The starter's still under
    debate.

    Company on New Year's Eve, too. We'll be having venison with a dried cherry
    and pinot noir sauce, butternut squash timbales, probably green beans,
    salad. Lemon tart for dessert and, if I get really motivated, hot chocolate
    truffles (chocolate ganache rolled in cinnamon sugar and then briefly deep
    fried -- seriously addictive and altogether splendifferous). Probably
    gougere and phyllo pastry filled with duxelles for starters. It's a long
    night, gotta keep the food coming. :) Oh, and of course the traditional
    "kransekage" pyramid -- towering rings of baked marzipan cookies -- to go
    with the champagne at midnight.

    Crap, I need to make my shopping list. With the stores here closed from the
    24th through 27th, there's no time to procrastinate!

    -j
     
  3. Karen wrote:

    > I HAD planned to make my family's traditional steamed christmas
    > pudding but I haven't been able to find a suitable bowl for steaming
    > it... and I'd also planned to roast a turkey breast but the store only
    > had legs (Ugh), wings (even more ugh) and whole birds... so it looks
    > like that's out too :(
    >
    > What would you make for a christmas dinner just for two people...
    >
    > I bought a thick slice of leg ham and we might have that... so how do
    > I prepare it?


    Earlier this year I made a spiced (cloves & allspice) lemon marmalade and
    brushed it on a ham steak, then just cooked to glaze. Here's the complete
    menu:

    Salad with Strawberries, Pine Nuts, and Honey Vinaigrette
    Cardoons au Gratin
    Ham Steak Glazed with Spiced Lemon Marmalade
    Jasmine Rice with Peas and Caramelized Onions
    Pound Cake with Lychee Tea Creme Anglaise, Fresh Berries, and Whipped Cream

    Everything was easy to make, and it was a nice meal.

    Since berries are out of season now, I'd use dried cranberries in the salad
    and persimmon puree in the dessert (assuming you can get COMPLETELY RIPE
    persimmons).

    Bob
     
  4. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    Karen AKA Kajikit wrote:
    > I HAD planned to make my family's traditional steamed christmas
    > pudding but I haven't been able to find a suitable bowl for steaming
    > it... and I'd also planned to roast a turkey breast but the store only
    > had legs (Ugh), wings (even more ugh) and whole birds... so it looks
    > like that's out too :(
    >
    > What would you make for a christmas dinner just for two people...
    >

    Roasted cornish game hens. Depending on your combined appetites, usually
    one small bird per person works fine... if you have leftovers so be it. I
    love these things even though I don't care much for "regular" chicken. Make
    any side dishes you'd like. I'm doing cornbread dressing (baked in a bread
    pan) and some sort of steamed green veggie - so far the plan is broccoli
    with hollandaise sauce. I might make yellow squash casserole, too, if I can
    find suitable yellow squash this time of year.

    > I bought a thick slice of leg ham and we might have that... so how do
    > I prepare it?


    No idea, sorry.

    Jill
     
  5. Kathy

    Kathy Guest

    I used to do duck-for-two for Christmas Eve but after years of that I'm
    all ducked out. So since I'm well-supplied in organic chickens, I
    thought I'd try Mimi's Sticky Chicken. So far there's squash soup on
    the menu but I haven't worked out the rest. Potatoes of some sort,
    maybe twice baked or 'neeps-n-taties. Some other vegetable, maybe some
    of the peapods from the summer garden or maybe a salad including the
    winter lettuces growing in the washbasin on the porch. Maybe a steamed
    figgy pudding or I might try a cooked custard made with mexican
    chocolate.
     
  6. ntantiques

    ntantiques Guest

    Karen AKA Kajikit wrote:
    > I HAD planned to make my family's traditional steamed christmas
    > pudding but I haven't been able to find a suitable bowl for steaming
    > it... and I'd also planned to roast a turkey breast but the store only
    > had legs (Ugh), wings (even more ugh) and whole birds... so it looks
    > like that's out too :(
    >
    > What would you make for a christmas dinner just for two people...
    >
    > I bought a thick slice of leg ham and we might have that... so how do
    > I prepare it?
    >
    >
    > --
    > ~Karen aka Kajikit


    Karen, I think I'd glaze & bake the ham for a cosy Christmas Eve dinner
    - Bob's glaze sounds fabulous, but if you're looking for an easy one,
    try brushing it with a combo of red wine and peach or apricot
    preserves. Home made scalloped potatoes & a great salad would do make
    my DH a happy guy...

    I'd finish the ham off on Christmas morning using it in Eggs Benedict
    (which is our traditional Christmas Day brunch). If you're feeling
    wild, serve with a couple of Mimosas. This Mama does not make
    Hollandaise until after the opening of presents and consumption of
    several cups of coffee, so "breakfast" is always something simple like
    bagels with good shmear. For a festive Christmas dinner for 2, Cornish
    Game hens are a classic winner, but we're going with a couple of really
    nice filet mignons this year...just starting to think about the rest of
    the menu, but with just the 2 of us to celebrate the holiday, we do
    tend have fun "eating our way" through the day.

    Nancy T
     
  7. On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 08:21:40 -0500, Karen AKA Kajikit
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I HAD planned to make my family's traditional steamed christmas
    > pudding but I haven't been able to find a suitable bowl for steaming
    > it... and I'd also planned to roast a turkey breast but the store only
    > had legs (Ugh), wings (even more ugh) and whole birds... so it looks
    > like that's out too :(


    Whole turkeys are a better value, and you can do things with the dark
    meat to make it more palatable (we're not fans, either). I shred the
    cooked leg and thigh meat and slow cook it in barbecue sauce for
    sandwiches - much cheaper than beef. It's also better in soup than
    white meat - it's more tender, and I don't notice the dark meat taste
    in that context.

    > What would you make for a christmas dinner just for two people...


    We're having turkey, mashed potatoes, gravy, corn, and apple pie.

    I like what Kili's doing, making fondue. Very intimate.

    Meat, cheese, crackers, fresh fruit and wine would be a lovely,
    trouble-free way to share the holiday together.

    Please let us know what you wind up doing. I love ham too much to
    suggest anything other thanm "fry it and split it." <G>

    Carol
     
  8. sf

    sf Guest

    On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 08:21:40 -0500, Karen AKA Kajikit wrote:

    > I HAD planned to make my family's traditional steamed christmas
    > pudding but I haven't been able to find a suitable bowl for steaming
    > it... and I'd also planned to roast a turkey breast but the store only
    > had legs (Ugh), wings (even more ugh) and whole birds... so it looks
    > like that's out too :(
    >
    > What would you make for a christmas dinner just for two people...


    If you want turkey and wing/leg isn't as "ugh" as you say,,,, buy a
    small frozen turkey and have it sawed in 1/2 (while frozen). Cook 1/2
    for xmas and cook the other 1/2 at a later date.
    >
    > I bought a thick slice of leg ham and we might have that... so how do
    > I prepare it?


    I think cheese fondue - served and eaten in front of a fireplace would
    be much more romantic.
    ;)
    --

    Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
     
  9. sf

    sf Guest

    On 20 Dec 2005 09:37:03 -0600, Bob Terwilliger wrote:

    > spiced (cloves & allspice) lemon marmalade


    YUM! Don't hold back! Where's that recipe????

    :)
    --

    Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
     
  10. sf

    sf Guest

    On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 11:28:55 -0600, jmcquown wrote:

    > Roasted cornish game hens.


    Although I'd brush them with an orange/pineapple marmalade spiked with
    Grand Marnier, I think Terwilliger's lemon marmalade would be a good
    glaze too.
    --

    Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
     
  11. sf

    sf Guest

    On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 15:29:09 +0100, jacqui{JB} wrote:

    > we're having duck -- duck breasts, to be exact,


    Do you just go to your local grocery store to buy these? I can't
    recall ever seeing them at Safeway.

    :)

    --

    Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
     
  12. On Tue 20 Dec 2005 10:20:08p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it sf?

    > On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 15:29:09 +0100, jacqui{JB} wrote:
    >
    >> we're having duck -- duck breasts, to be exact,

    >
    > Do you just go to your local grocery store to buy these? I can't
    > recall ever seeing them at Safeway.
    >
    > :)


    Barbara, you must have missed the duck breast department. It's usually in
    that stall near the lobster aquarium.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    _____________________________________________

    A chicken in every pot is a *LOT* of chicken!
     
  13. jacqui{JB}

    jacqui{JB} Guest

    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > > we're having duck -- duck breasts, to be exact,


    > Do you just go to your local grocery store to buy
    > these? I can't recall ever seeing them at Safeway.


    Remarkably, yes -- even my local cheapo market has them most of the time.
    Frozen, of course, but very good quality. I've generally only see fresh
    duck here during hunting season, when, if it's cold enough, the ducks and
    pheasants are hanging outside the fishmongers (in what I consider to be a
    very bizarre twist, in DK game is handled by the fishmongers, rather than
    the butchers).

    -j
     
  14. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    sf wrote:
    > On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 11:28:55 -0600, jmcquown wrote:
    >
    >> Roasted cornish game hens.

    >
    > Although I'd brush them with an orange/pineapple marmalade spiked with
    > Grand Marnier, I think Terwilliger's lemon marmalade would be a good
    > glaze too.


    I'm not big into glazes but hey, go for it! I just brush with melted
    butter, do the salt & pepper thing, sprinkle with a little dried crushed
    rosemary or tarragon and roast per the directions on the package. If I
    don't stuff the birds (I'm not this year) I will sometimes put a half an
    onion and half a lemon in the cavity.

    Jill
     
  15. sf wrote:

    >> spiced (cloves & allspice) lemon marmalade

    >
    > YUM! Don't hold back! Where's that recipe????


    I just follow the recipe from Cook's, then add cloves and allspice at the
    end:

    Lemon Marmalade

    3 pounds Meyer lemons or lemons
    8 to 10 cups granulated sugar

    Slice the lemons as thinly as possible. Discard ends. Remove all seeds and
    tie them in a square of doubled cheesecloth. Put lemons and seed bag in a
    nonreactive bowl with enough water to cover. Let stand overnight. Measure
    the lemons and water into a wide, shallow, nonreactive pan. Add an equal
    volume of sugar and cook over low heat until sugar is dissolved. Raise heat
    to medium-high and cook, stirring frequently and skimming off the foam as it
    rises, until temperature reaches 220°F., about 1/2 hour. Remove marmalade
    from heat. To test for consistency, drop a little marmalade on a saucer and
    put the saucer into the freezer until marmalade is cold, about 5 minutes.
    Tip the saucer: the marmalade should just barely run. If too thin, return
    marmalade to medium-high heat and cook, testing often, until it has reached
    the right consistency. Put marmalade into hot, sterilized pint or half-pint
    jars. Store in refrigerator up to 1 month or, for longer storage, seal
    according to reliable canning instructions.

    Yields: 4 to 5 pints

    For the ham glaze, I cut the recipe WAY down, using only 3 lemons and just
    over 2 cups of sugar, and I didn't bother with any of the canning
    procedures. I added a pinch of cloves and a couple pinches of allspice when
    the marmalade had cooled to about 120°F.

    Bob
     
  16. jmcquown wrote:
    > sf wrote:
    >> On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 11:28:55 -0600, jmcquown wrote:
    >>
    >>> Roasted cornish game hens.

    >> Although I'd brush them with an orange/pineapple marmalade spiked with
    >> Grand Marnier, I think Terwilliger's lemon marmalade would be a good
    >> glaze too.

    >
    > I'm not big into glazes but hey, go for it! I just brush with melted
    > butter, do the salt & pepper thing, sprinkle with a little dried crushed
    > rosemary or tarragon and roast per the directions on the package. If I
    > don't stuff the birds (I'm not this year) I will sometimes put a half an
    > onion and half a lemon in the cavity.
    >
    > Jill
    >
    >

    Last year, in the summer at a friend's house, supper was Cornish game
    hens that were cut in half and baked sitting on a dried apricot bread
    dressing/stuffing mix. Both bird and stuffing tasted very good.
     
  17. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    Mr Libido Incognito wrote:
    > jmcquown wrote:
    >> sf wrote:
    >>> On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 11:28:55 -0600, jmcquown wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Roasted cornish game hens.
    >>> Although I'd brush them with an orange/pineapple marmalade spiked
    >>> with Grand Marnier, I think Terwilliger's lemon marmalade would be
    >>> a good glaze too.

    >>
    >> I'm not big into glazes but hey, go for it! I just brush with melted
    >> butter, do the salt & pepper thing, sprinkle with a little dried
    >> crushed rosemary or tarragon and roast per the directions on the
    >> package. If I don't stuff the birds (I'm not this year) I will
    >> sometimes put a half an onion and half a lemon in the cavity.
    >>
    >> Jill
    >>
    >>

    > Last year, in the summer at a friend's house, supper was Cornish game
    > hens that were cut in half and baked sitting on a dried apricot bread
    > dressing/stuffing mix. Both bird and stuffing tasted very good.


    I've grilled split cornish hens but I've never tried just roasting (baking)
    them. I'll give that a go sometime, thanks Alan.

    Jill
     
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