Christmas Pudding

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Alex, Dec 17, 2003.

  1. Alex

    Alex Guest

    I am thinking of making a Christmas Pudding this year for the first time, and i am seeking opinions
    as to how far in advance you would cook it and how long a home-made / non shop preserved would last?

    thanks for any help.

    alex
     
    Tags:


  2. Alex wrote:
    >
    > I am thinking of making a Christmas Pudding this year for the first time, and i am seeking
    > opinions as to how far in advance you would cook it and how long a home-made / non shop preserved
    > would last?
    >
    > thanks for any help.
    >
    > alex

    Bread pudding

    1/2 pound day old white bread 2 cups whole milk

    --

    3/4 cup sugar for caramel

    --
    4 eggs
    1 cup sugar
    4 tbsp butter
    2 tbsp dry sherry
    1/4 tsp nutmeg
    1/4 tsp cinnamon
    1/2 tsp vanilla
    1/2 tsp almond extract

    --

    1/2 cup golden raisins
    1/2 cup toasted almonds
    1 tbsp flour

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Cut the bread into cubes and soak in the milk.

    Make a caramel with the sugar. Pour into a mold with a capacity of 6 cups.

    Beat the eggs with the sugar, melted butter and sherry. Add cinnamon, nutmeg,
    vanilla, almond extract, the soaked bread. Powder the raisins and almonds with
    the flour and add.

    Pour the mixture into the mod and bake in a bain-marie for approximately two
    hours or until a toothpick intdoduced in the middle comes out dry.

    Let cool before unmolding. Gives 12 portions.

    Variations:

    Substitute the raisins with guava paste cut into small chunks. Or try quince
    paste instead.

    You can also add a tablespoonful or two of grated Edam cheese or a mild
    cheddar.

    I usually double the recipe and use a bundt cake mold. A bundt cake mold will
    fit exactly into one of my aluminum pots. I cover it with aluminum foil for
    about half of the baking period, punching a hole in the middle hole of the
    bundt cake mold and folding the edges into the hole to make sure water does
    not boil into the mold.

    You can reduce the sugar to 3/4 cup and add a pinch of salt.

    You don't need to worry about how long it will keep unless you plan on eating
    it by yourself. It goes quickly in my family.

    Translated from Cocina Criolla by Nitza Villapol. Variations are my mother's.
     
  3. Limey

    Limey Guest

    "Alex" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I am thinking of making a Christmas Pudding this year for the first time, and i am seeking
    > opinions as to how far in advance you would cook it and how long a home-made / non shop preserved
    > would last?
    >
    > thanks for any help.
    >
    > alex

    Here is what I know as Christmas pudding, known in the US as plum pudding. As you can see, they are
    often made as much as a month before Christmas. I know my mother did. My grandmother would load them
    up with silver charms - you had to eat it carefully, or you'd break a tooth!!

    Dora

    Christmas Pudding Plum pudding only took on its connections with Christmas when it was introduced to
    the Victorians by Prince Albert. Burying a silver coin in the pudding mixture is said to bring good
    fortune to whoever finds it in their portion and all the family should make a wish while stirring
    the mixture on Stir Up Sunday, the Sunday before Advent.

    Plain flour - 110g (4 oz) Ground mixed spice - ½ tsp Grated nutmeg - ¼ tsp Fresh breadcrumbs - 225g
    (8 oz) Shredded suet - 275g (10 oz) Soft brown sugar - 225g (8 oz) Raisins - 350g (12 oz) Sultanas -
    350g (12 oz) Mixed peel - 50g (2 oz), chopped Walnuts or blanched almonds - 50g (2 oz) Orange - 1
    small, zest only Eggs - 4, beaten Brandy or dry sherry - 50ml (2 fl oz) Almond essence - ½ tsp Milk
    - 150 ml (¼ pint)

    Sift flour, spice and nutmeg into a large bowl. Add breadcrumbs, suet, sugar, raisins, sultanas,
    peel, nuts and orange zest. Mix well.

    Combine the mix with the eggs, brandy or sherry, almond essence and milk.

    Divide the mixture between two greased 1.1 litre (2 pint) pudding basins. Cover with buttered
    greaseproof paper or foil. Pleat once to allow the pudding to rise.

    Secure with string. Use extra string to make a handle for ease of removal. Place in a steamer over a
    pan of boiling water and cover. Steam steadily for 6 hours, replacing the water as it boils away.

    Remove from the steamer, leave until cold. Cover with foil. Store in a cool place.

    To serve: cover and steam for 2 hours. Turn out on to a warm dish. Serve with brandy butter, fresh
    cream or custard.

    Makes 2 - each serves 8.

    Source: Helen's Internet Book of British Cooking
     
  4. Arri London

    Arri London Guest

    Alex wrote:
    >
    > I am thinking of making a Christmas Pudding this year for the first time, and i am seeking
    > opinions as to how far in advance you would cook it and how long a home-made / non shop preserved
    > would last?
    >
    > thanks for any help.
    >
    > alex

    Ah you are already too late. It should be made in late November (the Sunday before Advent, also
    known as 'Stir up Sunday') to mature for Christmas. Puds are pretty indestructible when made
    correctly! They are boiled or steamed for several hours at the making. Then they are steamed for a
    couple of hours on the day of serving.
     
  5. Kajikit

    Kajikit Guest

    Alex saw Sally selling seashells by the seashore and told us all about
    it on Fri, 12 Dec 2003 16:03:54 +0000:

    >I am thinking of making a Christmas Pudding this year for the first time, and i am seeking
    >opinions as to how far in advance you would cook it and how long a home-made / non shop preserved
    >would last?

    Do you want a traditional plumpudding?

    (huggles)

    ~Karen AKA Kajikit

    Nobody outstubborns a cat...

    Visit my webpage: http://www.kajikitscorner.com Allergyfree Eating Recipe Swap:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Allergyfree_Eating Ample Aussies Mailing List:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ampleaussies/
     
  6. Alex

    Alex Guest

    Thanks for that, any thoughts on how far in advance to make it? i was thinking more from a point of
    view of the flavours maturing etc.

    Cheers

    Alex

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Alex wrote:
    >
    >>I am thinking of making a Christmas Pudding this year for the first time, and i am seeking
    >>opinions as to how far in advance you would cook it and how long a home-made / non shop preserved
    >>would last?
    >>
    >>thanks for any help.
    >>
    >>alex
    >
    >
    > Bread pudding
    >
    > 1/2 pound day old white bread 2 cups whole milk
    >
    > --
    >
    > 3/4 cup sugar for caramel
    >
    > --
    > 4 eggs 1 cup sugar 4 tbsp butter 2 tbsp dry sherry
    > 1/4 tsp nutmeg
    > 1/4 tsp cinnamon
    > 1/2 tsp vanilla
    > 1/2 tsp almond extract
    >
    > --
    >
    > 1/2 cup golden raisins
    > 1/2 cup toasted almonds 1 tbsp flour
    >
    > Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Cut the bread into cubes and soak in the milk.
    >
    > Make a caramel with the sugar. Pour into a mold with a capacity of 6 cups.
    >
    > Beat the eggs with the sugar, melted butter and sherry. Add cinnamon, nutmeg, vanilla, almond
    > extract, the soaked bread. Powder the raisins and almonds with the flour and add.
    >
    > Pour the mixture into the mod and bake in a bain-marie for approximately two hours or until a
    > toothpick intdoduced in the middle comes out dry.
    >
    > Let cool before unmolding. Gives 12 portions.
    >
    > Variations:
    >
    > Substitute the raisins with guava paste cut into small chunks. Or try quince paste instead.
    >
    > You can also add a tablespoonful or two of grated Edam cheese or a mild cheddar.
    >
    > I usually double the recipe and use a bundt cake mold. A bundt cake mold will fit exactly into one
    > of my aluminum pots. I cover it with aluminum foil for about half of the baking period, punching a
    > hole in the middle hole of the bundt cake mold and folding the edges into the hole to make sure
    > water does not boil into the mold.
    >
    > You can reduce the sugar to 3/4 cup and add a pinch of salt.
    >
    > You don't need to worry about how long it will keep unless you plan on eating it by yourself. It
    > goes quickly in my family.
    >
    > Translated from Cocina Criolla by Nitza Villapol. Variations are my mother's.
     
  7. Alex wrote:
    >
    > Thanks for that, any thoughts on how far in advance to make it? i was thinking more from a point
    > of view of the flavours maturing etc.
    >
    > Cheers
    >
    > Alex
    >
    > [email protected] wrote:
    > > Alex wrote:
    > >
    > >>I am thinking of making a Christmas Pudding this year for the first time, and i am seeking
    > >>opinions as to how far in advance you would cook it and how long a home-made / non shop
    > >>preserved would last?
    > >>
    > >>thanks for any help.
    > >>
    > >>alex
    > >
    > >
    > > Bread pudding
    > >
    > > 1/2 pound day old white bread 2 cups whole milk
    > >
    > > --
    > >
    > > 3/4 cup sugar for caramel
    > >
    > > --
    > > 4 eggs 1 cup sugar 4 tbsp butter 2 tbsp dry sherry
    > > 1/4 tsp nutmeg
    > > 1/4 tsp cinnamon
    > > 1/2 tsp vanilla
    > > 1/2 tsp almond extract
    > >
    > > --
    > >
    > > 1/2 cup golden raisins
    > > 1/2 cup toasted almonds 1 tbsp flour
    > >
    > > Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Cut the bread into cubes and soak in the milk.
    > >
    > > Make a caramel with the sugar. Pour into a mold with a capacity of 6 cups.
    > >
    > > Beat the eggs with the sugar, melted butter and sherry. Add cinnamon, nutmeg, vanilla, almond
    > > extract, the soaked bread. Powder the raisins and almonds with the flour and add.
    > >
    > > Pour the mixture into the mod and bake in a bain-marie for approximately two hours or until a
    > > toothpick intdoduced in the middle comes out dry.
    > >
    > > Let cool before unmolding. Gives 12 portions.
    > >
    > > Variations:
    > >
    > > Substitute the raisins with guava paste cut into small chunks. Or try quince paste instead.
    > >
    > > You can also add a tablespoonful or two of grated Edam cheese or a mild cheddar.
    > >
    > > I usually double the recipe and use a bundt cake mold. A bundt cake mold will fit exactly into
    > > one of my aluminum pots. I cover it with aluminum foil for about half of the baking period,
    > > punching a hole in the middle hole of the bundt cake mold and folding the edges into the hole to
    > > make sure water does not boil into the mold.
    > >
    > > You can reduce the sugar to 3/4 cup and add a pinch of salt.
    > >
    > > You don't need to worry about how long it will keep unless you plan on eating it by yourself. It
    > > goes quickly in my family.
    > >
    > > Translated from Cocina Criolla by Nitza Villapol. Variations are my mother's.

    I don't think there is a need to give time for flavors to mature. The stuff is delicious right off
    the mold after cooling. Moist, with a tang from the caramel that is out of this world.

    But you can make it one or two days before. Just don't unmold it or someone is sure to grab a piece.
    The smell fills the house as soon as you unmold it.

    Please let me know how it comes out. Maybe you can run a test before Christmas.

    Bert
     
  8. Alex

    Alex Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > Alex wrote:
    >
    >>Thanks for that, any thoughts on how far in advance to make it? i was thinking more from a point
    >>of view of the flavours maturing etc.
    >>
    >>Cheers
    >>
    >>Alex
    >>
    >>[email protected] wrote:
    >>
    >>>Alex wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>I am thinking of making a Christmas Pudding this year for the first time, and i am seeking
    >>>>opinions as to how far in advance you would cook it and how long a home-made / non shop
    >>>>preserved would last?
    >>>>
    >>>>thanks for any help.
    >>>>
    >>>>alex
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Bread pudding
    >>>
    >>>1/2 pound day old white bread 2 cups whole milk
    >>>
    >>>--
    >>>
    >>>3/4 cup sugar for caramel
    >>>
    >>>--
    >>>4 eggs 1 cup sugar 4 tbsp butter 2 tbsp dry sherry
    >>>1/4 tsp nutmeg
    >>>1/4 tsp cinnamon
    >>>1/2 tsp vanilla
    >>>1/2 tsp almond extract
    >>>
    >>>--
    >>>
    >>>1/2 cup golden raisins
    >>>1/2 cup toasted almonds 1 tbsp flour
    >>>
    >>>Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Cut the bread into cubes and soak in the milk.
    >>>
    >>>Make a caramel with the sugar. Pour into a mold with a capacity of 6 cups.
    >>>
    >>>Beat the eggs with the sugar, melted butter and sherry. Add cinnamon, nutmeg, vanilla, almond
    >>>extract, the soaked bread. Powder the raisins and almonds with the flour and add.
    >>>
    >>>Pour the mixture into the mod and bake in a bain-marie for approximately two hours or until a
    >>>toothpick intdoduced in the middle comes out dry.
    >>>
    >>>Let cool before unmolding. Gives 12 portions.
    >>>
    >>>Variations:
    >>>
    >>>Substitute the raisins with guava paste cut into small chunks. Or try quince paste instead.
    >>>
    >>>You can also add a tablespoonful or two of grated Edam cheese or a mild cheddar.
    >>>
    >>>I usually double the recipe and use a bundt cake mold. A bundt cake mold will fit exactly into
    >>>one of my aluminum pots. I cover it with aluminum foil for about half of the baking period,
    >>>punching a hole in the middle hole of the bundt cake mold and folding the edges into the hole to
    >>>make sure water does not boil into the mold.
    >>>
    >>>You can reduce the sugar to 3/4 cup and add a pinch of salt.
    >>>
    >>>You don't need to worry about how long it will keep unless you plan on eating it by yourself. It
    >>>goes quickly in my family.
    >>>
    >>>Translated from Cocina Criolla by Nitza Villapol. Variations are my mother's.
    >
    >
    > I don't think there is a need to give time for flavors to mature. The stuff is delicious right off
    > the mold after cooling. Moist, with a tang from the caramel that is out of this world.
    >
    > But you can make it one or two days before. Just don't unmold it or someone is sure to grab a
    > piece. The smell fills the house as soon as you unmold it.
    >
    > Please let me know how it comes out. Maybe you can run a test before Christmas.
    >
    > Bert

    many thanks

    i doubt i will have the time to do a test run, i am working up to the 23rd.

    i have one question and one variation request.

    Is there an actual measurement in metric (or imperial) as i don't know about using cup, sorry a post
    decimalization Englishman!!

    And i will only be making for adults so was thinking about a little touch of cointreau, can you
    suggest any variation on the recipe as you've been a good salesman so far!!

    Thanks again.
     
  9. Alex wrote:
    >
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > > Alex wrote:
    > >
    > >>Thanks for that, any thoughts on how far in advance to make it? i was thinking more from a point
    > >>of view of the flavours maturing etc.
    > >>
    > >>Cheers
    > >>
    > >>Alex
    > >>
    > >>[email protected] wrote:
    > >>
    > >>>Alex wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>>>I am thinking of making a Christmas Pudding this year for the first time, and i am seeking
    > >>>>opinions as to how far in advance you would cook it and how long a home-made / non shop
    > >>>>preserved would last?
    > >>>>
    > >>>>thanks for any help.
    > >>>>
    > >>>>alex
    > >>>
    > >>>

    <snip>

    >>>Translated from Cocina Criolla by Nitza Villapol. Variations are my mother's.
    > >
    > >
    > > I don't think there is a need to give time for flavors to mature. The stuff is delicious right
    > > off the mold after cooling. Moist, with a tang from the caramel that is out of this world.
    > >
    > > But you can make it one or two days before. Just don't unmold it or someone is sure to grab a
    > > piece. The smell fills the house as soon as you unmold it.
    > >
    > > Please let me know how it comes out. Maybe you can run a test before Christmas.
    > >
    > > Bert
    >
    > many thanks
    >
    > i doubt i will have the time to do a test run, i am working up to the 23rd.
    >
    > i have one question and one variation request.
    >
    > Is there an actual measurement in metric (or imperial) as i don't know about using cup, sorry a
    > post decimalization Englishman!!
    >
    > And i will only be making for adults so was thinking about a little touch of cointreau, can you
    > suggest any variation on the recipe as you've been a good salesman so far!!
    >
    > Thanks again.

    One cup = 237 ml. But I doubt it will make much difference if you use 250 ml. Funny, there has been
    a "lively" discussion on measurements in the rec.food.sourdough newsgroup.

    As to your question on cointreau I would suggest you don't. The recipe as I posted it has a
    distinctive almond aroma and taste that might conflict with the orange flavor of the cointreau. If
    you want to do that I would omit the almond extract. The same for substituting the almonds with some
    other nuts.

    If you do make the substitution I would love to hear about it.

    Bert
     
  10. Jean Clarke

    Jean Clarke Guest

    I spent most of my day making a plum pudding. I couldn't find a place to by the fresh suet, so I
    used lard for the first time. I hope it will be okay. It looks pretty, because I had a standard 2
    qt. mold. I put some glace' cherries and roasted pecans at the base. Once it was cooled a bit, I
    wrapped it in cheese cloth and saturated it with a French brandy. Tomorrow I will sample the small
    one I made from the same batch, which I steamed in a cocoa tin. I plan to take the large one to a
    friend's party next week. Of course, it will be ritually flambed and accompanied with a lemon hard
    sauce and or, vanilla custard.

    Just a Jeanie
     
  11. "limey" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Alex" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > I am thinking of making a Christmas Pudding this year for the first time, and i am seeking
    > > opinions as to how far in advance you would cook it and how long a home-made / non shop
    > > preserved would last?
    > >
    > > thanks for any help.
    > >
    > > alex
    >
    > Here is what I know as Christmas pudding, known in the US as plum pudding. As you can see, they
    > are often made as much as a month before Christmas. I know my mother did. My grandmother would
    > load them up with silver charms - you had to eat it carefully, or you'd break a tooth!!
    >
    > Dora
    >
    > Christmas Pudding

    <delicious recipe snipped>

    Dora,

    Do you know of any source for shredded suet in the US? Pesonally, I cannot think of any other fat
    that makes for a good substitute, not only for Christmas pudding but for mince pies as well.

    Thank you, Wayne
     
  12. Diane Epps

    Diane Epps Guest

    "Jean Clarke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I spent most of my day making a plum pudding. I couldn't find a place to by the fresh suet, so I
    > used lard for the first time. I hope it will be okay. It looks pretty, because I had a standard 2
    > qt. mold. I put some glace' cherries and roasted pecans at the base. Once it was cooled a bit, I
    > wrapped it in cheese cloth and saturated it with a French brandy. Tomorrow I will sample the small
    > one I made from the same batch, which I steamed in a cocoa tin. I plan to take the large one to a
    > friend's party next week. Of course, it will be ritually flambed and accompanied with a lemon hard
    > sauce and or, vanilla custard.
    >
    > Just a Jeanie
    >
    You could ask a butcher for some of the fat surrounding the beef kidney and grate it yourself.
     
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