Chronc hamstring pain

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Bp, Oct 5, 2003.

  1. Bp

    Bp Guest

    I am sure a question like this has been asked before so I apologise in advance.

    I am a middle aged jogger who injured his right hamstring sprinting for a soccer ball at age 15. The
    injury was mid-thigh, brought me down immediately, and involved I think at least a partial tear of
    one the hamstring muscles. It was pretty much the end of my sprinting career but I was able to get
    back into jogging in college. Over the last five years I have noticed a progressive diminution in my
    exercise tolerance to the point that I can no longer jog three miles on consecutive days without
    experiencing pain at the original injury site.

    What should I do to maximise my exercise tolerance?
     
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  2. Doug Freese

    Doug Freese Guest

    bp wrote:
    > I am a middle aged jogger who injured his right hamstring sprinting for a soccer ball at age 15.
    > The injury was mid-thigh, brought me down immediately,

    Not that it makes a difference other than vocabulary but you are using thigh, which is front of the
    leg and hamstring which is back of leg together. Where specifically is the problem.

    > What should I do to maximise my exercise tolerance?

    Get to a medico and find out what the problem probably is and likely end up with a Physical or
    Massage therapist to rehab the injury site. Could be scaring with the old injury, your shoes,
    running surface to include camber, lack of flexibility, etc., but the MD, PT or MT should
    cover this.

    --
    Doug Freese [email protected]
     
  3. Bill

    Bill Guest

    > I am sure a question like this has been asked before so I apologise in advance.
    >
    > I am a middle aged jogger who injured his right hamstring sprinting for a soccer ball at age 15.
    > The injury was mid-thigh, brought me down immediately, and involved I think at least a partial
    > tear of one the hamstring muscles. It was pretty much the end of my sprinting career but I was
    > able to get back into jogging in college. Over the last five years I have noticed a progressive
    > diminution in my exercise tolerance to the point that I can no longer jog three miles on
    > consecutive days without experiencing pain at the original injury site.
    >
    > What should I do to maximise my exercise tolerance?

    Warm up on a rowing machine, if you have good form.
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>, Doug Freese <[email protected]> wrote:

    > bp wrote:
    > > I am a middle aged jogger who injured his right hamstring sprinting for a soccer ball at age
    > > 15. The injury was mid-thigh, brought me down immediately,
    >
    > Not that it makes a difference other than vocabulary but you are using thigh, which is front of
    > the leg and hamstring which is back of leg together. Where specifically is the problem.
    >
    > > What should I do to maximise my exercise tolerance?
    >
    > Get to a medico and find out what the problem probably is and likely end up with a Physical or
    > Massage therapist to rehab the injury site. Could be scaring with the old injury, your shoes,
    > running surface to include camber, lack of flexibility, etc., but the MD, PT or MT should
    > cover this.

    While you're waiting for someone to check you out, you might want to practice sitting on two tennis
    balls under your hamstrings and rolling back and forth on them. Also as you work on them sit up a
    bit straighter and you'll see that the hams get tighter. If that is the case, then posture is
    playing a big role in your hamstring problems.

    Check out: http://www.mindfulness.com/of4.asp for playing with posture and
    http://www.mindfulness.com/oi1.asp on proper stretching.

    If you are slouching then that is one of the major reasons for the hamstring to shorten....along
    with the psoas. Another piece is working on the quads so that the hams don't have to work against an
    antagonist muscle group: http://www.mindfulness.com/of.5

    In health and on the run, Ozzie Gontang Maintainer - rec.running FAQ Director, San Diego Marathon
    Clinic, est. 1975

    Mindful Running: http://www.mindfulness.com/mr.asp http://www.faqs.org/faqs/running-faq/
     
  5. Michael

    Michael Guest

    Does heat or cold on the hamstring help with healing?

    M.

    "Ozzie Gontang" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:051020031303399347%[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, Doug Freese <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > bp wrote:
    > > > I am a middle aged jogger who injured his right hamstring sprinting for a soccer ball at age
    > > > 15. The injury was mid-thigh, brought me down immediately,
    > >
    > > Not that it makes a difference other than vocabulary but you are using thigh, which is front of
    > > the leg and hamstring which is back of leg together. Where specifically is the problem.
    > >
    > > > What should I do to maximise my exercise tolerance?
    > >
    > > Get to a medico and find out what the problem probably is and likely end up with a Physical or
    > > Massage therapist to rehab the injury site. Could be scaring with the old injury, your shoes,
    > > running surface to include camber, lack of flexibility, etc., but the MD, PT or MT should
    > > cover this.
    >
    >
    > While you're waiting for someone to check you out, you might want to practice sitting on two
    > tennis balls under your hamstrings and rolling back and forth on them. Also as you work on them
    > sit up a bit straighter and you'll see that the hams get tighter. If that is the case, then
    > posture is playing a big role in your hamstring problems.
    >
    > Check out: http://www.mindfulness.com/of4.asp for playing with posture and
    > http://www.mindfulness.com/oi1.asp on proper stretching.
    >
    > If you are slouching then that is one of the major reasons for the hamstring to shorten....along
    > with the psoas. Another piece is working on the quads so that the hams don't have to work against
    > an antagonist muscle group: http://www.mindfulness.com/of.5
    >
    > In health and on the run, Ozzie Gontang Maintainer - rec.running FAQ Director, San Diego Marathon
    > Clinic, est. 1975
    >
    > Mindful Running: http://www.mindfulness.com/mr.asp http://www.faqs.org/faqs/running-faq/
     
  6. In article <[email protected]>, Michael <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Does heat or cold on the hamstring help with healing?
    >
    > M.

    When the injury has just occured, then cold is recommended to keep down any unnecessary swelling
    that might damage tissue around the area.

    Heat to a new injury often will cause more swelling which is not what is wanted.

    Heat and cold alternated to areas that have stopped swelling is to increase blood flow and
    circulation to the area for healing.

    Heat often will allow the muscles to be warmed and able to stretch more. In some cases it may be a
    problem as people strain the area and the end result is the muscle tightens to protect itself...and
    then the fascia protects that tightened shortened muscle.

    In health and on the run,

    Ozzie
     
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