Chuckle of the Day

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Andy, Nov 30, 2005.



  1. Andy

    Andy Guest

    Margaret Suran wrote:

    >
    >
    > Andy wrote:
    >> http://tinyurl.com/8hzvb
    >>
    >>
    >> OB Food: http://tinyurl.com/aev6o

    >
    >
    > Good Morning, Two good ones, thank you. I guess you are trying to
    > make up for the missed days. :eek:)



    Margaret,

    Did you miss yesterday's CotD? I included "ketchup" chuckles.

    All the best,

    Andy
     
  2. Andy wrote:

    > Margaret,
    >
    > Did you miss yesterday's CotD? I included "ketchup" chuckles.
    >
    > All the best,
    >
    > Andy



    No, I did not miss it, of course. I just had not found it in my heart
    to forgive you just then. :eek:)

    Why did you call them Ketchup chuckles? Because you were ketching up?

    Ketchup is such a weird condiment, until I had a cleaning lady who
    asked me for some with her lunch, in 1977, I never kept any at home.
    I still cannot stand the taste of it and only use it to make cocktail
    sauce for seafood, for others, not for myself. Nobody I invited for
    dinner ever asked for Ketchup, since that would have been considered
    an insult for the hostess, hinting that the dish needed something that
    was missing or a taste that had to be suppressed.
     
  3. Andy

    Andy Guest

    Margaret Suran wrote:

    >
    >
    > Andy wrote:
    >
    >> Margaret,
    >>
    >> Did you miss yesterday's CotD? I included "ketchup" chuckles.
    >>
    >> All the best,
    >>
    >> Andy

    >
    >
    > No, I did not miss it, of course. I just had not found it in my heart
    > to forgive you just then. :eek:)


    I understand. ;)


    > Why did you call them Ketchup chuckles? Because you were ketching up?


    Right. Corny, huh?!!


    > Ketchup is such a weird condiment, until I had a cleaning lady who
    > asked me for some with her lunch, in 1977, I never kept any at home.
    > I still cannot stand the taste of it and only use it to make cocktail
    > sauce for seafood, for others, not for myself. Nobody I invited for
    > dinner ever asked for Ketchup, since that would have been considered
    > an insult for the hostess, hinting that the dish needed something that
    > was missing or a taste that had to be suppressed.


    I was told if it's not on the table to begin with or offered, don't ask,
    except at a restaurant. I like ketchup for tater tots and on burgers.

    But more importantly: Zig-zag or Continental?

    :)

    --
    Andy
    Continental
     
  4. kilikini

    kilikini Guest

    "Margaret Suran" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    >
    > Andy wrote:
    >
    > > Margaret,
    > >
    > > Did you miss yesterday's CotD? I included "ketchup" chuckles.
    > >
    > > All the best,
    > >
    > > Andy

    >
    >
    > No, I did not miss it, of course. I just had not found it in my heart
    > to forgive you just then. :eek:)
    >
    > Why did you call them Ketchup chuckles? Because you were ketching up?
    >
    > Ketchup is such a weird condiment, until I had a cleaning lady who
    > asked me for some with her lunch, in 1977, I never kept any at home.
    > I still cannot stand the taste of it and only use it to make cocktail
    > sauce for seafood, for others, not for myself. Nobody I invited for
    > dinner ever asked for Ketchup, since that would have been considered
    > an insult for the hostess, hinting that the dish needed something that
    > was missing or a taste that had to be suppressed.


    You know, Margaret, I used to love ketchup. I bought some for the first
    time in a few years about a month ago, ate it and went, UGH. Wow, was it
    always so sweet? I think I'm going to have to try to make my own or
    something. It was awful!

    kili
     
  5. kilikini wrote:
    > "Margaret Suran" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>
    >>Ketchup is such a weird condiment, until I had a cleaning lady who
    >>asked me for some with her lunch, in 1977, I never kept any at home.
    >>I still cannot stand the taste of it and only use it to make cocktail
    >>sauce for seafood, for others, not for myself. Nobody I invited for
    >>dinner ever asked for Ketchup, since that would have been considered
    >>an insult for the hostess, hinting that the dish needed something that
    >>was missing or a taste that had to be suppressed.

    >
    >
    > You know, Margaret, I used to love ketchup. I bought some for the first
    > time in a few years about a month ago, ate it and went, UGH. Wow, was it
    > always so sweet? I think I'm going to have to try to make my own or
    > something. It was awful!
    >
    > kili
    >
    >

    It is more than the sweetness, it has a vile taste, as far as I am
    concerned. Also, I had never seen it in Europe and the people with
    whom I socialized when I came here were mostly refugees, too and had
    no Ketchup in their homes.

    I tried it the first time, when a boy, an American boy, took me to
    Coney Island and treated me to a Hot Dog. I was almost fifteen and
    this was a really big deal, a real date! We were going to share an
    order of French Fries and he dumped a bunch of Ketchup on the
    potatoes. I picked up one and popped it into my mouth and nearly
    became ill. Of course, once you put something into your mouth you
    could not spit it out and I bravely tried to swallow the offending
    piece of food without chewing it, to minimize the taste. I had
    thought it would taste like a tomato, but instead there was sugar,
    spices and lots of vinegar. :eek:( Luckily, I had a glass of water and
    drank all of it, to wash it down. Sadly, I could not eat the
    frankfurter after that, but the boy gobbled it up, when he saw that I
    meant to leave it on the plate.

    That was more than 64 years ago, yet I can still almost taste the
    Ketchup when I think back to that day.
     
  6. Andy wrote:
    > Margaret Suran wrote:
    >
    >
    >>
    >>Andy wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Margaret,
    >>>
    >>>Did you miss yesterday's CotD? I included "ketchup" chuckles.
    >>>
    >>>All the best,
    >>>
    >>>Andy

    >>
    >>
    >>No, I did not miss it, of course. I just had not found it in my heart
    >>to forgive you just then. :eek:)

    >
    >
    > I understand. ;)
    >
    >
    >
    >>Why did you call them Ketchup chuckles? Because you were ketching up?

    >
    >
    > Right. Corny, huh?!!
    >
    >
    >
    >>Ketchup is such a weird condiment, until I had a cleaning lady who
    >>asked me for some with her lunch, in 1977, I never kept any at home.
    >>I still cannot stand the taste of it and only use it to make cocktail
    >>sauce for seafood, for others, not for myself. Nobody I invited for
    >>dinner ever asked for Ketchup, since that would have been considered
    >>an insult for the hostess, hinting that the dish needed something that
    >>was missing or a taste that had to be suppressed.

    >
    >
    > I was told if it's not on the table to begin with or offered, don't ask,
    > except at a restaurant. I like ketchup for tater tots and on burgers.
    >
    > But more importantly: Zig-zag or Continental?
    >
    > :)



    Sorry, what does that mean? > Zig-zag or Continental?
     
  7. Andy

    Andy Guest

    Margaret Suran wrote:

    >
    >
    > Andy wrote:
    >> Margaret Suran wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>
    >>>Andy wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Margaret,
    >>>>
    >>>>Did you miss yesterday's CotD? I included "ketchup" chuckles.
    >>>>
    >>>>All the best,
    >>>>
    >>>>Andy
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>No, I did not miss it, of course. I just had not found it in my
    >>>heart to forgive you just then. :eek:)

    >>
    >>
    >> I understand. ;)
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>>Why did you call them Ketchup chuckles? Because you were ketching
    >>>up?

    >>
    >>
    >> Right. Corny, huh?!!
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>>Ketchup is such a weird condiment, until I had a cleaning lady who
    >>>asked me for some with her lunch, in 1977, I never kept any at home.
    >>>I still cannot stand the taste of it and only use it to make cocktail
    >>>sauce for seafood, for others, not for myself. Nobody I invited for
    >>>dinner ever asked for Ketchup, since that would have been considered
    >>>an insult for the hostess, hinting that the dish needed something
    >>>that was missing or a taste that had to be suppressed.

    >>
    >>
    >> I was told if it's not on the table to begin with or offered, don't
    >> ask, except at a restaurant. I like ketchup for tater tots and on
    >> burgers.
    >>
    >> But more importantly: Zig-zag or Continental?
    >>
    >> :)

    >
    >
    > Sorry, what does that mean? > Zig-zag or Continental?



    It was a preference about how to use a fork while dining.


    ******

    The Zig Zag Method
    By American custom, which was brought about partly by the late
    introduction of the fork into the culture, all three utensils are
    intended for use primarily with the right hand, which is the more capable
    hand for most people. This leads to some complicated maneuvering when
    foods, such as meat, require the use of knife and fork to obtain a bite
    of manageable size. When this is the case, the fork is held in the left
    hand, turned so that the tines point downward, the better to hold the
    meat in place while the right hand operates the knife. After a bite-sized
    piece has been cut, the diner sets the knife down on the plate and
    transfers the fork to the right hand, so that it can be used to carry the
    newly cut morsel to the mouth. Emily Post calls this the "zig-zag" style.

    European Style
    The European, or "Continental," style of using knife and fork is
    somewhat more efficient, and its practice is also common in the United
    States, where left-handed children are no longer forced to learn to wield
    a fork with their right hands. According to this method, the fork is held
    continuously in the left hand and used for eating. When food must be cut,
    the fork is used exactly as in the American style, except that once the
    bite has been separated from the whole, it is conveyed directly to the
    mouth on the downward-facing fork. Regardless of which style is used to
    operate fork and knife, it is important never to cut more than one or two
    bites at one time.

    *****

    --
    Andy
     
  8. Andy wrote:
    > Margaret Suran wrote:
    >
    >
    >>
    >>Andy wrote:
    >>
    >>>Margaret Suran wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Andy wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>Margaret,
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Did you miss yesterday's CotD? I included "ketchup" chuckles.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>All the best,
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Andy
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>No, I did not miss it, of course. I just had not found it in my
    >>>>heart to forgive you just then. :eek:)
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>I understand. ;)
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Why did you call them Ketchup chuckles? Because you were ketching
    >>>>up?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Right. Corny, huh?!!
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Ketchup is such a weird condiment, until I had a cleaning lady who
    >>>>asked me for some with her lunch, in 1977, I never kept any at home.
    >>>>I still cannot stand the taste of it and only use it to make cocktail
    >>>>sauce for seafood, for others, not for myself. Nobody I invited for
    >>>>dinner ever asked for Ketchup, since that would have been considered
    >>>>an insult for the hostess, hinting that the dish needed something
    >>>>that was missing or a taste that had to be suppressed.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>I was told if it's not on the table to begin with or offered, don't
    >>>ask, except at a restaurant. I like ketchup for tater tots and on
    >>>burgers.
    >>>
    >>>But more importantly: Zig-zag or Continental?
    >>>
    >>>:)

    >>
    >>
    >>Sorry, what does that mean? > Zig-zag or Continental?

    >
    >
    >
    > It was a preference about how to use a fork while dining.
    >
    >
    > ******
    >
    > The Zig Zag Method
    > By American custom, which was brought about partly by the late
    > introduction of the fork into the culture, all three utensils are
    > intended for use primarily with the right hand, which is the more capable
    > hand for most people. This leads to some complicated maneuvering when
    > foods, such as meat, require the use of knife and fork to obtain a bite
    > of manageable size. When this is the case, the fork is held in the left
    > hand, turned so that the tines point downward, the better to hold the
    > meat in place while the right hand operates the knife. After a bite-sized
    > piece has been cut, the diner sets the knife down on the plate and
    > transfers the fork to the right hand, so that it can be used to carry the
    > newly cut morsel to the mouth. Emily Post calls this the "zig-zag" style.
    >
    > European Style
    > The European, or "Continental," style of using knife and fork is
    > somewhat more efficient, and its practice is also common in the United
    > States, where left-handed children are no longer forced to learn to wield
    > a fork with their right hands. According to this method, the fork is held
    > continuously in the left hand and used for eating. When food must be cut,
    > the fork is used exactly as in the American style, except that once the
    > bite has been separated from the whole, it is conveyed directly to the
    > mouth on the downward-facing fork. Regardless of which style is used to
    > operate fork and knife, it is important never to cut more than one or two
    > bites at one time.
    >
    > *****
    >


    Continental, of course. When I first came here, most Americans used
    the change-over style, but lately I have noticed that most use the
    European way of eating, fork in the left hand, knife in the right one,
    throughout the meal. If no knife is needed, the fork is held in the
    right hand.

    I never heard the expression Zig Zag used for the American way of
    eating. :eek:) Thank you.
     
  9. maxine in ri

    maxine in ri Guest

    On Wed, 30 Nov 2005 06:48:25 -0500, Margaret Suran
    <[email protected]> connected the dots and wrote:


    ~Ketchup is such a weird condiment, until I had a cleaning lady who
    ~asked me for some with her lunch, in 1977, I never kept any at home.
    ~I still cannot stand the taste of it and only use it to make cocktail
    ~sauce for seafood, for others, not for myself. Nobody I invited for
    ~dinner ever asked for Ketchup, since that would have been considered
    ~an insult for the hostess, hinting that the dish needed something
    that
    ~was missing or a taste that had to be suppressed.

    Ah Margaret! You have never tasted my roasted tomatoes! I make them
    with a dash of balsamic vinegar and a pinch each of sugar and salt,
    and roast them until they are almost hard. _They_ taste like ketchup,
    which adds an interesting note when not poured on like water over the
    Hoover Dam.

    Next cook-in, I'll try to bring some. Would you travel to the wilds
    of RI for a cook-in?

    maxine in ri
     
  10. maxine in ri wrote:
    > On Wed, 30 Nov 2005 06:48:25 -0500, Margaret Suran
    > <[email protected]> connected the dots and wrote:
    >
    >
    > ~Ketchup is such a weird condiment, until I had a cleaning lady who
    > ~asked me for some with her lunch, in 1977, I never kept any at home.
    > ~I still cannot stand the taste of it and only use it to make cocktail
    > ~sauce for seafood, for others, not for myself. Nobody I invited for
    > ~dinner ever asked for Ketchup, since that would have been considered
    > ~an insult for the hostess, hinting that the dish needed something
    > that
    > ~was missing or a taste that had to be suppressed.
    >
    > Ah Margaret! You have never tasted my roasted tomatoes! I make them
    > with a dash of balsamic vinegar and a pinch each of sugar and salt,
    > and roast them until they are almost hard. _They_ taste like ketchup,
    > which adds an interesting note when not poured on like water over the
    > Hoover Dam.
    >
    > Next cook-in, I'll try to bring some. Would you travel to the wilds
    > of RI for a cook-in?
    >
    > maxine in ri



    Maxine, I doubt that I will ever go to another Cook-in. The one to
    which I went was so perfect and I think of it very frequently, I am
    afraid that no other one can be that wonderful. That has nothing to
    do with whoever the host or hostess would be, it is just that I am
    afraid that I would expect perfection, which probably only exists in
    my mind.

    As for bragging that you take perfectly good tomatoes and roast them
    until they taste like Ketchup, I can only think of one thing to say to
    you: For Shame!!! :eek:)
     
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