Cinelli bike size / fit question

Discussion in 'Bike buying advice' started by captaindog, Jan 9, 2016.

  1. captaindog

    captaindog New Member

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    O.k i want to build a bike for commuting and i am thinking of the Cinelli Mash Work Frameset but i am between the XL size or the XXL and i need to decide which one to order.

    My measurements are:

    Height: 191 cm
    Stenum Height (Inseam + Torso): 158 cm
    Inseam: 89 cm
    Torso: 69 cm
    Arm Length : 60 cm

    The cinelli mash work frameset geometry is the following:

    [​IMG]

    Which size should i go with? XL or XXL based on your opinion?

    I will build this bike with 170mm cranks and 100mm Stem in case it helps. Also the thing with this bike is that i can build it like a fixed gear bike or Cyclocross bike...
     
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  2. cyberlegend1994

    cyberlegend1994 Moderator

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    Sounds like a question for an experienced fitter. If you can find a LBS that does fittings, they should be able to answer that for you.

    Good luck and welcome aboard!
     
  3. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    First, you can build almost any bike into a Single Speed, so that shouldn't be amongst your criteria for choosing any frameset ...
    ...

    BUT, that raises the questions ...
    1. WHY the short crank arm length?
    2. AND why the short stem length?
    Are you salvaging those components from another bike?!?

    Will you be building the bike with DROP handlebars or as a FLAT Bar bike?

    Other than your current, planned component size choices AND possible dual use, I'm not sure why you think that you are in-between sizes ...

    As far as being able to use the frame for Cyclocross, if that is actually your ultimate intention, then you might want the XL frameset with the shorter, 58cm top tube if you were going to use a normal-for-your-height stem length (110-to-130) ... but, the comparatively short stem would suggest the XXL frameset would be better for YOU (alone!!).

    IMO (and, others may disagree), someone who is over 6'1" (which you are by 2") should automatically be looking for a frame with a 60cm-or-longer top tube regardless of handlebar type OR stem length UNLESS they have a medical limitation OR possibly if they are over 65 years of age ...​

    That is, YOUR overall flexibility needs to be factored in because the frame size will also dictate the stem-and-handlebar height.​

    BTW. If you don't need a frame with Cinelli decals on the down tube, then you may want to look for a Hardtail 29er frame & mate it with an appropriate-to-the-frame RIGID fork (e.g., a carbon fiber Tandem-or-"touring" fork). If you know that you are not going to use a tire which is larger than 700x42 then you can actually opt for a Hardtail 26er frame which will then allow you to have a slightly higher BB shell when mated with slightly bigger wheels (a good thing for Fixed Single Speeds + for more obstacle clearance).

    BTW2/FYI. The chart you included is tough to read ... AND, using a URL which requires a password isn't helpful.
     
  4. captaindog

    captaindog New Member

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    170 mm cranks because ther is possibility with 175mm to have the pedals hit the asphalt when turn ( acommon issue with fixed gear bikes)

    100mm stem because thats a stem i have already in my possesion. I might buy another one depnding on size....

    So...in a few words i am looking which size actually is better for my proportions and which size will feel more right in my body....

    as for the chart i am putting a new one....

    http://g-m-t.co.jp/gmt.cycle/frame/cinelli/chinellimash-work-geometry.jpg

    [​IMG]
     
  5. captaindog

    captaindog New Member

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    to put it better....the thing that concerns me about the XL size is the seat tube which the C-C measurement is 54cm and 58cm C-T...The top tube of the XL is 57 cm and not 58cm....

    The XXL size from the other hand has a 60cm Top tube which i think it would be too much for my height but it seems more right in the seat tube measurement which is 60cm C-T (or 56cm C-C)...
     
  6. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    I don't know what happened to the reply I posted yesterday. I voted for the XXL on the basis that you're 6'3", you have a 10 cm stem, and a 57 cm top tube is really quite short for your size.

    The saddle height on either size should not be an issue, but the XXL certainly makes that decision easier by 15 mm. FYI, I'm slightly shy of 6'0", with 89 cm legs. My fixie, built on a track frame, is 58 cm (c-t) with a 56 cm top tube and a 13 cm stem.

    And 170 mm cranks, alf, so I don't scrape around corners.
     
  7. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    THANKS ...

    Of course, I hope that you understand that I do realize that the conventional wisdom to choose shorter crankarms when riding a Fixie is to avoid the potential of scraping the pedals when going through turns ...

    The OP's imprecision of his equating a Fixie with a comparatively wussy, Freewheeling Single Speed left the question of choice in the air (IMO, at least!?!) ...​

    FWIW. Several years ago, I took the time to determine the potential lean angle on one of my Road bikes (vs. my pseudo-Track frame) with a pair of clipless pedals (my mundane Wellgo copies of my Shimano SPD-R pedals) AND the lean angle was astonishing when the pedals were on 175mm cranks ... much more than one could achieve with a pair of Quill pedals, of course ...

    There was probably enough potential lean to equate to clearance on the relatively steep sides of a velodrome's track which would not be scraped unless the rider fell ...

    In other words, the lean angle was greater than I would intentionally lean a bike when going through a turn.

    Of course, you may lean more aggressively than I do in turns.​

    THAT's probably another overly long way of saying that the belief that one needs to worry about striking the pavement with a pedal when cornering WHEN USING CLIPLESS PEDALS may not exist as it does when using traditional Quill pedals ...

    Regardless, you may want to see how far you can lean any of your regular Road bikes.​

    BTW. While I've been on some older roads whose crowning is steeper where I have bottomed out the pedal (!!!!) on a turn, as cloddish as it sounds, you CAN grind your way through the turn if necessary without falling if you don't panic ...

    Oh! The "bad"/(alternate!?!) riding techniques one can learn from MTBing!​
     
    #7 alfeng, Jan 10, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2016
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