Cipollini caught speeding

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Stan Lipnowski, Feb 21, 2003.

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  1. A coule of bike web sites have run a blurb on Cipo being fined for speeding while on his bike (he
    was drafting a car). One site said he was doing 70 kph, another site said it was 90 kph. How fast
    can these guys go a level road? Just curious. Stan
     
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  2. Buck

    Buck Guest

    "Stan Lipnowski" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > A coule of bike web sites have run a blurb on Cipo being fined for
    speeding
    > while on his bike (he was drafting a car). One site said he was doing 70 kph, another site said it
    > was 90 kph. How fast can these guys go a level road? Just curious.

    In the draft from a vehicle, from the Guinness Book of World Records: The highest speed ever
    achieved on a bicycle is 268.831 km/h (167.043 mph), by Fred Rompelberg (The Netherlands) at
    Bonneville Salt Flats, Utah, USA, on October 3, 1995. His record attempt was greatly assisted by the
    slipstream from his lead vehicle. Fred has been cycling professionally for nearly 30 years and
    during that time has held 11 world records.

    -Buck
     
  3. Ken

    Ken Guest

    "Stan Lipnowski" <[email protected]> wrote in news:qQz5a.47486$7 [email protected]:
    > A coule of bike web sites have run a blurb on Cipo being fined for speeding while on his bike (he
    > was drafting a car). One site said he was doing 70 kph, another site said it was 90 kph. How fast
    > can these guys go a level road?

    If you ever saw the movie "Breaking Away", the kid was supposedly drafting a truck at 60 mph. I've
    heard that the stuntman was really riding at that speed (in the long shot, not the closeup). 60 mph
    is close to 90 kph.

    I believe that cyclists drafting racing cars have exceeded 140 mph (on salt flats). I suppose
    motorpaced speeds are more limited by machinery and guts than by muscles.

    A more impressive record is that fully faired bicycles have broken 80 mph with *no drafting*. Of
    course, alot of technology goes into these bikes as well.

    Ken
     
  4. Forget about drafting cars, what about professionals in a good sprint? Stan
    >
    > If you ever saw the movie "Breaking Away", the kid was supposedly drafting
    a
    > truck at 60 mph. I've heard that the stuntman was really riding at that speed (in the long shot,
    > not the closeup). 60 mph is close to 90 kph.
    >
    > I believe that cyclists drafting racing cars have exceeded 140 mph (on
    salt
    > flats). I suppose motorpaced speeds are more limited by machinery and
    guts
    > than by muscles.
    >
    > A more impressive record is that fully faired bicycles have broken 80 mph with *no drafting*. Of
    > course, alot of technology goes into these bikes
    as
    > well.
    >
    > Ken
     
  5. "Stan Lipnowski" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > A coule of bike web sites have run a blurb on Cipo being fined for
    speeding
    > while on his bike (he was drafting a car). One site said he was doing 70 kph, another site said it
    > was 90 kph. How fast can these guys go a level
    \> \ Mario wasn't fined for speeding, the limit on that stretch of the Superstrada is 110 kph,
    rather the PolStrada pulled him over because bicycles are not allowed on the limited access road.

    Tucked in behind a car is just a matter of how fast you can turn your largest gear, the draft is so
    strong that 85+ kph is no real trouble.

    For training it's normal to motopace behind some small motorscooter like a Vespa or something.
     
  6. Edward Dike

    Edward Dike Guest

    "Ken" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    | "Stan Lipnowski" <[email protected]> wrote in news:qQz5a.47486$7 [email protected]:
    | > A coule of bike web sites have run a blurb on Cipo being fined for
    speeding
    | > while on his bike (he was drafting a car). One site said he was doing 70 kph, another site said
    | > it was 90 kph. How fast can these guys go a level road?
    |
    | If you ever saw the movie "Breaking Away", the kid was supposedly drafting
    a
    | truck at 60 mph. I've heard that the stuntman was really riding at that speed (in the long shot,
    | not the closeup). 60 mph is close to 90 kph.
    |
    | I believe that cyclists drafting racing cars have exceeded 140 mph (on
    salt
    | flats). I suppose motorpaced speeds are more limited by machinery and
    guts
    | than by muscles.
    |
    | A more impressive record is that fully faired bicycles have broken 80 mph with *no drafting*. Of
    | course, alot of technology goes into these bikes
    as
    | well.
    |
    | Ken

    If you believe 10% of Breaking Away, with the semi-trailer pacing stunt at the the top of the list,
    then I got a bridge you might be interested in.

    The high speed passes on the salt flats are not anything close to unassisted... they get pulled
    up to speed by the pacing vehicle, pedal a bit in a 100+MPH tailwind, and reattach, if I am not
    mistaken. I think John Howard was among the first of such hucksters... discounting of course,
    Mile-a-Minute Fabreezoweinie......er Murphy and yes, 60MPH is CLOSE to 90KPH...but much closer
    to 98KPH ED3
     
  7. On Fri, 21 Feb 2003 20:49:06 -0500, Ken wrote:

    > If you ever saw the movie "Breaking Away", the kid was supposedly drafting a truck at 60 mph. I've
    > heard that the stuntman was really riding at that speed (in the long shot, not the closeup). 60
    > mph is close to 90 kph.

    The really amazing thing was as the camera panned down on the bike in a close-up, you could see he
    was in the little chainring. Now that is spinning.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | To announce that there must be no criticism of the president, or _`\(,_ | that we are to
    stand by the president right or wrong, is not (_)/ (_) | only unpatriotic and servile, but is
    morally treasonable to the American public. --Theodore Roosevelt
     
  8. Ken wrote:
    >
    > "Stan Lipnowski" <[email protected]> wrote in news:qQz5a.47486$7 [email protected]:
    > > A coule of bike web sites have run a blurb on Cipo being fined for speeding while on his bike
    > > (he was drafting a car). One site said he was doing 70 kph, another site said it was 90 kph. How
    > > fast can these guys go a level road?
    >
    > If you ever saw the movie "Breaking Away", the kid was supposedly drafting a truck at 60 mph. I've
    > heard that the stuntman was really riding at that speed (in the long shot, not the closeup). 60
    > mph is close to 90 kph.
    >

    I've done 58 MPH without drafting anything on long downhills. I don't race, and I don't consider
    myself any sort of exceptional cyclist. I have no doubt a pro could attain such a speed. For how
    long? I don't know.

    Barry
     
  9. Terry Morse

    Terry Morse Guest

    Fabrizio Mazzoleni wrote:

    > For training it's normal to motopace behind some small motorscooter like a Vespa or something.

    Two Team Saturn boys behind a scooter blew past me yesterday. So what's the point of training to
    ride behind a scooter? It's not like anybody does that in a race.
    --
    terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://www.terrymorse.com/bike/
     
  10. Harris

    Harris Guest

    "Fabrizio Mazzoleni" wrote:

    > Tucked in behind a car is just a matter of how fast you can turn your largest gear, the draft is
    > so strong that 85+ kph is no real trouble.

    Fab is right. In 1899, "Mile a Minute" Murphy rode his bike a mile in 57 seconds while drafting a
    Long Island Rail Road train. See:

    http://www.newsday.com/extras/lihistory/histpast/lirrsky.htm

    Art Harris
     
  11. Edward Dike

    Edward Dike Guest

    "Jon Isaacs" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    | >I think John Howard was among the first of such hucksters...
    |
    | I suggest you talk to John Howard about what it was like to go down at
    130mph
    | plus before calling him a huckster. When someone can set a record by
    driving a
    | motor vehicle, I think drafting on a bicycle at 150mph+ is a serious
    challenge.
    |
    | John was far from the first and of course there are many well establish
    track
    | events that involve motor pacing.
    |
    | Regarding how fast a Pro can sprint, the world record for the flying
    200meters
    | is a tad bit under 10 seconds which works out to about 45mph.
    |
    | jon isaacs

    I may be wrong, as such stunts are of little interest to me, but I recall Howard being the first on
    the salt flats( perhaps just a better PR machine at work) with a far more elaborate(and in my mind,
    bogus) set-up, compared to the motor pacing done on a track. That he may have fallen does not add
    credibility to such a stunt. In my mind, such antics diminish his reputation in view of his other
    cycling accomplishments. ED3
     
  12. Karen M.

    Karen M. Guest

    Ken wrote:

    > > If you ever saw the movie "Breaking Away", the kid was supposedly drafting a truck at 60 mph.
    > > I've heard that the stuntman was really riding at that speed (in the long shot, not the
    > > closeup). 60 mph is close to 90 kph.

    David:
    > The really amazing thing was as the camera panned down on the bike in a close-up, you could see he
    > was in the little chainring. Now that is spinning.

    Yeah, and he shifts *down* to speed up! (It's really fun to watch that flick in a cycling
    group. The LAW/B rallies used to feature a movie night...the MST3K buddies had nothing on us.)
    --Karen M.
     
  13. "David L. Johnson" <David L. Johnson <[email protected]>> spake thusly on or about Sat, 22
    Feb 2003 03:39:24 UTC

    -> -> The really amazing thing was as the camera panned down on the bike in a -> close-up, you could
    see he was in the little chainring. Now that is -> spinning. ->

    ok now I have to go find the silly movie to see this. I hate missing continuity problems

    --
    I hurt before the ride so fibro gives me a head start on the rest of the pack. silver lining?
    [email protected]
     
  14. Ray Heindl

    Ray Heindl Guest

    "Harris" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > "Fabrizio Mazzoleni" wrote:
    >
    >> Tucked in behind a car is just a matter of how fast you can turn your largest gear, the draft is
    >> so strong that 85+ kph is no real trouble.
    >
    > Fab is right. In 1899, "Mile a Minute" Murphy rode his bike a mile in 57 seconds while drafting a
    > Long Island Rail Road train. See:
    >
    > http://www.newsday.com/extras/lihistory/histpast/lirrsky.htm

    Thanks for the link; that's an interesting article.

    What does Mile-a-Minute Murphy mean when he refers to a "hometrainer"? Would that be rollers, or
    something more like a modern windtrainer, or what?

    --
    Ray Heindl (remove the X to reply)
     
  15. In article <[email protected]>, Terry Morse <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Fabrizio Mazzoleni wrote:
    >
    > > For training it's normal to motopace behind some small motorscooter like a Vespa or something.
    >
    > Two Team Saturn boys behind a scooter blew past me yesterday. So what's the point of training to
    > ride behind a scooter? It's not like anybody does that in a race.
    > --
    > terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://www.terrymorse.com/bike/

    The purpose is to simulate fast paceline or peloton racing: they are practicing their paceline
    speeds so that they can pull the cadences and get used to the efforts involved, and also so
    that when they face a guy so fast that he seems motorized, they can suck his wheel until they
    wear him out.

    Motorpacing is pretty standard training for roadies. Pretty much all the pros do it as part of
    their routine.

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  16. Harris

    Harris Guest

    "Ray Heindl" wrote:
    > "Harris" wrote:
    >
    > > In 1899, "Mile a Minute" Murphy rode his bike a mile in 57 seconds while drafting a Long Island
    > > Rail Road train. See:
    > >
    > > http://www.newsday.com/extras/lihistory/histpast/lirrsky.htm
    >
    > Thanks for the link; that's an interesting article.
    >
    > What does Mile-a-Minute Murphy mean when he refers to a "hometrainer"? Would that be rollers, or
    > something more like a modern windtrainer, or what?

    I would guess he meant rollers since anything with progressive resistance would limit speed. He
    seems to imply that his speed on the "home-trainer" was only limited by how fast he could pedal.

    Art Harris
     
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