Citron

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Dee Randall, Mar 28, 2006.

  1. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    Here is a picture of a citron from googling images for citron.
    http://www.tunedal.com/images/citron.jpg

    It looks quite similar to a lemon AFAIC.
    ***

    On p. 66 of Bugialli's book "Classic Techniques" two male hands are shown
    slicing up "a whole glaceed citron." Looks like something pretty big and it
    says,
    "Citron resembles a large lemon but is a different fruit in that it is
    larger, shaped like a quince, and has a rough thick skin. It is very
    popular in the Mediterranean and it's mostly used there and elsewhere for
    making glaceed fruit."

    Here is another link that has two pictures, both quite different
    http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/citron.html

    Has anyone seen citron in any markets (here in the U.S.)?
    Thanks,
    Dee
     
    Tags:


  2. modom

    modom Guest

    On Tue, 28 Mar 2006 17:15:08 -0500, "Dee Randall"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Here is a picture of a citron from googling images for citron.
    >http://www.tunedal.com/images/citron.jpg
    >
    >It looks quite similar to a lemon AFAIC.
    >***
    >
    >On p. 66 of Bugialli's book "Classic Techniques" two male hands are shown
    >slicing up "a whole glaceed citron." Looks like something pretty big and it
    >says,
    >"Citron resembles a large lemon but is a different fruit in that it is
    >larger, shaped like a quince, and has a rough thick skin. It is very
    >popular in the Mediterranean and it's mostly used there and elsewhere for
    >making glaceed fruit."
    >
    >Here is another link that has two pictures, both quite different
    >http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/citron.html
    >
    >Has anyone seen citron in any markets (here in the U.S.)?
    >Thanks,
    >Dee


    I think I saw it at Central Market in Plano, TX last year. Also, I'm
    told that the cabdied citron sold at holidays for pastries is indeed
    citron.
    --
    modom
     
  3. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "modom" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Tue, 28 Mar 2006 17:15:08 -0500, "Dee Randall"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Here is a picture of a citron from googling images for citron.
    >>http://www.tunedal.com/images/citron.jpg
    >>
    >>It looks quite similar to a lemon AFAIC.
    >>***
    >>
    >>On p. 66 of Bugialli's book "Classic Techniques" two male hands are shown
    >>slicing up "a whole glaceed citron." Looks like something pretty big and
    >>it
    >>says,
    >>"Citron resembles a large lemon but is a different fruit in that it is
    >>larger, shaped like a quince, and has a rough thick skin. It is very
    >>popular in the Mediterranean and it's mostly used there and elsewhere for
    >>making glaceed fruit."
    >>
    >>Here is another link that has two pictures, both quite different
    >>http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/citron.html
    >>
    >>Has anyone seen citron in any markets (here in the U.S.)?
    >>Thanks,
    >>Dee

    >
    > I think I saw it at Central Market in Plano, TX last year. Also, I'm
    > told that the cabdied citron sold at holidays for pastries is indeed
    > citron.
    > --
    > modom


    I notice that King Arthur is back order on their unsulphured citron. I'd
    really like to find unsulphured citron elsewhere -- but mainly because of
    KA's prices. I recall I did order without worrying about S&H when I lived
    in Hawaii, but I'm not there any longer. And, those were my salad days
    besides.

    I'd like to have a pannetone without crap citron -- I also think I'd make a
    mess of it if I tried to candy/glacee it myself.
    Dee Dee
     
  4. Arri London

    Arri London Guest

    Dee Randall wrote:
    >
    > Here is a picture of a citron from googling images for citron.
    > http://www.tunedal.com/images/citron.jpg
    >
    > It looks quite similar to a lemon AFAIC.
    > ***
    >
    > On p. 66 of Bugialli's book "Classic Techniques" two male hands are shown
    > slicing up "a whole glaceed citron." Looks like something pretty big and it
    > says,
    > "Citron resembles a large lemon but is a different fruit in that it is
    > larger, shaped like a quince, and has a rough thick skin. It is very
    > popular in the Mediterranean and it's mostly used there and elsewhere for
    > making glaceed fruit."
    >
    > Here is another link that has two pictures, both quite different
    > http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/citron.html
    >
    > Has anyone seen citron in any markets (here in the U.S.)?
    > Thanks,
    > Dee


    Only in Jewish markets around Passover. A posh shop might have glaceed
    citron though.
     
  5. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Arri London wrote:
    > Dee Randall wrote:
    > >
    > > Here is a picture of a citron from googling images for citron.
    > > http://www.tunedal.com/images/citron.jpg
    > >
    > > It looks quite similar to a lemon AFAIC.
    > > ***
    > >
    > > On p. 66 of Bugialli's book "Classic Techniques" two male hands are shown
    > > slicing up "a whole glaceed citron." Looks like something pretty big and it
    > > says,
    > > "Citron resembles a large lemon but is a different fruit in that it is
    > > larger, shaped like a quince, and has a rough thick skin. It is very
    > > popular in the Mediterranean and it's mostly used there and elsewhere for
    > > making glaceed fruit."
    > >
    > > Here is another link that has two pictures, both quite different
    > > http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/citron.html
    > >
    > > Has anyone seen citron in any markets (here in the U.S.)?
    > > Thanks,
    > > Dee

    >
    > Only in Jewish markets around Passover. A posh shop might have glaceed
    > citron though.


    What's a Jewish market, is that like a Moslem market, a Catholic
    market, a Presbytarian market?

    In the US glace citron is sold throughout the year at most any
    stupidmarket, but better quality (and price) can be had from specialty
    shops. There are lots of excellent sources on the net:

    http://www.nutsonline.com/driedfrui...cam3grp13AdB&gclid=CJ-Ww9KGg4QCFSZxFQode3VXew

    http://www.thenutfactory.com/kitchen/facts/facts-glazed-fruits.html

    Sheldon
     
  6. me

    me Guest

  7. dee

    dee Guest

    Dee Randall wrote:
    > Here is a picture of a citron from googling images for citron.
    > http://www.tunedal.com/images/citron.jpg
    >
    > It looks quite similar to a lemon AFAIC.
    > ***
    >
    > On p. 66 of Bugialli's book "Classic Techniques" two male hands are shown
    > slicing up "a whole glaceed citron." Looks like something pretty big and it
    > says,
    > "Citron resembles a large lemon but is a different fruit in that it is
    > larger, shaped like a quince, and has a rough thick skin. It is very
    > popular in the Mediterranean and it's mostly used there and elsewhere for
    > making glaceed fruit."
    >
    > Here is another link that has two pictures, both quite different
    > http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/citron.html
    >
    > Has anyone seen citron in any markets (here in the U.S.)?
    > Thanks,
    > Dee


    ...does look like lemon.. another pic:
    http://www.foodsubs.com/Fruitcit.html
     
  8. On Wed 29 Mar 2006 01:31:15a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it dee?

    >
    > Dee Randall wrote:
    >> Here is a picture of a citron from googling images for citron.
    >> http://www.tunedal.com/images/citron.jpg
    >>
    >> It looks quite similar to a lemon AFAIC.
    >> ***
    >>
    >> On p. 66 of Bugialli's book "Classic Techniques" two male hands are
    >> shown slicing up "a whole glaceed citron." Looks like something pretty
    >> big and it says, "Citron resembles a large lemon but is a different
    >> fruit in that it is larger, shaped like a quince, and has a rough thick
    >> skin. It is very popular in the Mediterranean and it's mostly used
    >> there and elsewhere for making glaceed fruit."
    >>
    >> Here is another link that has two pictures, both quite different
    >> http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/citron.html
    >>
    >> Has anyone seen citron in any markets (here in the U.S.)?
    >> Thanks,
    >> Dee

    >
    > ..does look like lemon.. another pic:
    > http://www.foodsubs.com/Fruitcit.html


    Although citron in its raw state is quite yellow, when it is candied it has
    a distinct translucent slightly greenish color.

    http://tinyurl.com/en7v9

    I usually see it for sale in most supermarkets around the holidays, and
    it's most often sold diced, about 1/4-3/8". If it's not fresh, it gets
    quite hard. I think that's the characteristic that puts people off citron
    if they've never had it freshly processed.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright @¿@¬
    _____________________
     
  9. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "me" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Here is another link that has two pictures, both quite different
    >> http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/citron.html
    >>
    >> Has anyone seen citron in any markets (here in the U.S.)?

    >
    > My food co-op (and, likely, others in the Twin Cities) carries the
    > Fingered Citron (pictured in the link above) as a seasonal item. It
    > is often labeled as "Buddha's Hand".
    >
    > sd


    I see 2 different ones now
    1. Citrus medica
    2. FINGERED CITRON, Citrus medica var. sarcodactylus which is also Buddah's
    Hand

    The picture of one that Bugialli was showing in his book was the citrus
    medica, not the buddah's hand. I guess one would have to dig deeper in a
    taste test to decide which is the best.
    Dee Dee
     
  10. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "dee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Dee Randall wrote:
    >> Here is a picture of a citron from googling images for citron.
    >> http://www.tunedal.com/images/citron.jpg
    >>
    >> It looks quite similar to a lemon AFAIC.
    >> ***
    >>
    >> On p. 66 of Bugialli's book "Classic Techniques" two male hands are shown
    >> slicing up "a whole glaceed citron." Looks like something pretty big and
    >> it
    >> says,
    >> "Citron resembles a large lemon but is a different fruit in that it is
    >> larger, shaped like a quince, and has a rough thick skin. It is very
    >> popular in the Mediterranean and it's mostly used there and elsewhere for
    >> making glaceed fruit."
    >>
    >> Here is another link that has two pictures, both quite different
    >> http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/citron.html
    >>
    >> Has anyone seen citron in any markets (here in the U.S.)?
    >> Thanks,
    >> Dee

    >
    > ..does look like lemon.. another pic:
    > http://www.foodsubs.com/Fruitcit.html


    Whoa -- that looks like an octopus -- BTW, I really like this site and the
    pictures.
    Dee Dee
     
  11. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "Wayne Boatwright" <wayneboatwright_at_gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Wed 29 Mar 2006 01:31:15a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it dee?
    >
    >>
    >> Dee Randall wrote:
    >>> Here is a picture of a citron from googling images for citron.
    >>> http://www.tunedal.com/images/citron.jpg
    >>>
    >>> It looks quite similar to a lemon AFAIC.
    >>> ***
    >>>
    >>> On p. 66 of Bugialli's book "Classic Techniques" two male hands are
    >>> shown slicing up "a whole glaceed citron." Looks like something pretty
    >>> big and it says, "Citron resembles a large lemon but is a different
    >>> fruit in that it is larger, shaped like a quince, and has a rough thick
    >>> skin. It is very popular in the Mediterranean and it's mostly used
    >>> there and elsewhere for making glaceed fruit."
    >>>
    >>> Here is another link that has two pictures, both quite different
    >>> http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/citron.html
    >>>
    >>> Has anyone seen citron in any markets (here in the U.S.)?
    >>> Thanks,
    >>> Dee

    >>
    >> ..does look like lemon.. another pic:
    >> http://www.foodsubs.com/Fruitcit.html

    >
    > Although citron in its raw state is quite yellow, when it is candied it
    > has
    > a distinct translucent slightly greenish color.
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/en7v9
    >
    > I usually see it for sale in most supermarkets around the holidays, and
    > it's most often sold diced, about 1/4-3/8". If it's not fresh, it gets
    > quite hard. I think that's the characteristic that puts people off citron
    > if they've never had it freshly processed.
    >
    > --
    > Wayne Boatwright @¿@¬
    > _____________________


    And thanks for this link -- I see they have pictured a citron of the
    Buddah's hand variety, vs. Bugialli's pictured one he was making glacee out
    of, which was not Buddah's hand. I'm going to keep this link and perhaps
    order from there sometime. I keep hoping I'll see one at the Asian market,
    too at some time. Now I think I'll be able to recognize one -- but I'd
    probably have a hard time dealing with its preparation.
    Dee Dee
     
  12. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "Wayne Boatwright" <wayneboatwright_at_gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Wed 29 Mar 2006 07:52:17a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Dee
    > Randall?
    >
    >>
    >> "Wayne Boatwright" <wayneboatwright_at_gmail.com> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>> On Wed 29 Mar 2006 01:31:15a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it dee?
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Dee Randall wrote:
    >>>>> Here is a picture of a citron from googling images for citron.
    >>>>> http://www.tunedal.com/images/citron.jpg
    >>>>>
    >>>>> It looks quite similar to a lemon AFAIC.
    >>>>> ***
    >>>>>
    >>>>> On p. 66 of Bugialli's book "Classic Techniques" two male hands are
    >>>>> shown slicing up "a whole glaceed citron." Looks like something
    >>>>> pretty big and it says, "Citron resembles a large lemon but is a
    >>>>> different fruit in that it is larger, shaped like a quince, and has a
    >>>>> rough thick skin. It is very popular in the Mediterranean and it's
    >>>>> mostly used there and elsewhere for making glaceed fruit."
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Here is another link that has two pictures, both quite different
    >>>>> http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/citron.html
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Has anyone seen citron in any markets (here in the U.S.)?
    >>>>> Thanks,
    >>>>> Dee
    >>>>
    >>>> ..does look like lemon.. another pic:
    >>>> http://www.foodsubs.com/Fruitcit.html
    >>>
    >>> Although citron in its raw state is quite yellow, when it is candied it
    >>> has a distinct translucent slightly greenish color.
    >>>
    >>> http://tinyurl.com/en7v9
    >>>
    >>> I usually see it for sale in most supermarkets around the holidays, and
    >>> it's most often sold diced, about 1/4-3/8". If it's not fresh, it gets
    >>> quite hard. I think that's the characteristic that puts people off
    >>> citron if they've never had it freshly processed.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Wayne Boatwright @¿@¬ _____________________

    >>
    >> And thanks for this link -- I see they have pictured a citron of the
    >> Buddah's hand variety, vs. Bugialli's pictured one he was making glacee
    >> out of, which was not Buddah's hand. I'm going to keep this link and
    >> perhaps order from there sometime. I keep hoping I'll see one at the
    >> Asian market, too at some time. Now I think I'll be able to recognize
    >> one -- but I'd probably have a hard time dealing with its preparation.
    >> Dee Dee

    >
    > I don't know if it's really worth the trouble of candying one's own
    > citron,
    > orange peel, and lemon peel. I know it certainly isn't worth my time. If
    > good quality product is available, I would definitely not do it. Having
    > said that, much of what is carried in the average supermarket during the
    > pre-holiday season is really awful.
    >
    > --
    > Wayne Boatwright Õ¿Õ¬


    Pretty awful, indeed. It makes me (and DH) sick! I'm going to keep up my
    watch for some - I always look in produce and other areas to see if someone
    has imported some.

    I agree with you regarding one's time. Some things are worth it -- some
    not. I would have to perfect my recipe before adding citron. Then, of
    course, how would one tell if the recipe was perfect if one didn't have
    perfect citron? Hmmm -- another puzzlement.
    Dee Dee
     
  13. On Wed 29 Mar 2006 07:52:17a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Dee
    Randall?

    >
    > "Wayne Boatwright" <wayneboatwright_at_gmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> On Wed 29 Mar 2006 01:31:15a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it dee?
    >>
    >>>
    >>> Dee Randall wrote:
    >>>> Here is a picture of a citron from googling images for citron.
    >>>> http://www.tunedal.com/images/citron.jpg
    >>>>
    >>>> It looks quite similar to a lemon AFAIC.
    >>>> ***
    >>>>
    >>>> On p. 66 of Bugialli's book "Classic Techniques" two male hands are
    >>>> shown slicing up "a whole glaceed citron." Looks like something
    >>>> pretty big and it says, "Citron resembles a large lemon but is a
    >>>> different fruit in that it is larger, shaped like a quince, and has a
    >>>> rough thick skin. It is very popular in the Mediterranean and it's
    >>>> mostly used there and elsewhere for making glaceed fruit."
    >>>>
    >>>> Here is another link that has two pictures, both quite different
    >>>> http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/citron.html
    >>>>
    >>>> Has anyone seen citron in any markets (here in the U.S.)?
    >>>> Thanks,
    >>>> Dee
    >>>
    >>> ..does look like lemon.. another pic:
    >>> http://www.foodsubs.com/Fruitcit.html

    >>
    >> Although citron in its raw state is quite yellow, when it is candied it
    >> has a distinct translucent slightly greenish color.
    >>
    >> http://tinyurl.com/en7v9
    >>
    >> I usually see it for sale in most supermarkets around the holidays, and
    >> it's most often sold diced, about 1/4-3/8". If it's not fresh, it gets
    >> quite hard. I think that's the characteristic that puts people off
    >> citron if they've never had it freshly processed.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Wayne Boatwright @¿@¬ _____________________

    >
    > And thanks for this link -- I see they have pictured a citron of the
    > Buddah's hand variety, vs. Bugialli's pictured one he was making glacee
    > out of, which was not Buddah's hand. I'm going to keep this link and
    > perhaps order from there sometime. I keep hoping I'll see one at the
    > Asian market, too at some time. Now I think I'll be able to recognize
    > one -- but I'd probably have a hard time dealing with its preparation.
    > Dee Dee


    I don't know if it's really worth the trouble of candying one's own citron,
    orange peel, and lemon peel. I know it certainly isn't worth my time. If
    good quality product is available, I would definitely not do it. Having
    said that, much of what is carried in the average supermarket during the
    pre-holiday season is really awful.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright Õ¿Õ¬
    ________________________________________

    Okay, okay, I take it back! UnScrew you!
     
  14. On Wed 29 Mar 2006 12:26:04p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Dee
    Randall?

    >
    > "Wayne Boatwright" <wayneboatwright_at_gmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> On Wed 29 Mar 2006 07:52:17a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Dee
    >> Randall?
    >>
    >>>
    >>> "Wayne Boatwright" <wayneboatwright_at_gmail.com> wrote in message
    >>> news:[email protected]
    >>>> On Wed 29 Mar 2006 01:31:15a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it dee?
    >>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Dee Randall wrote:
    >>>>>> Here is a picture of a citron from googling images for citron.
    >>>>>> http://www.tunedal.com/images/citron.jpg
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> It looks quite similar to a lemon AFAIC.
    >>>>>> ***
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> On p. 66 of Bugialli's book "Classic Techniques" two male hands are
    >>>>>> shown slicing up "a whole glaceed citron." Looks like something
    >>>>>> pretty big and it says, "Citron resembles a large lemon but is a
    >>>>>> different fruit in that it is larger, shaped like a quince, and has
    >>>>>> a rough thick skin. It is very popular in the Mediterranean and
    >>>>>> it's mostly used there and elsewhere for making glaceed fruit."
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Here is another link that has two pictures, both quite different
    >>>>>> http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/citron.html
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Has anyone seen citron in any markets (here in the U.S.)?
    >>>>>> Thanks,
    >>>>>> Dee
    >>>>>
    >>>>> ..does look like lemon.. another pic:
    >>>>> http://www.foodsubs.com/Fruitcit.html
    >>>>
    >>>> Although citron in its raw state is quite yellow, when it is candied
    >>>> it has a distinct translucent slightly greenish color.
    >>>>
    >>>> http://tinyurl.com/en7v9
    >>>>
    >>>> I usually see it for sale in most supermarkets around the holidays,
    >>>> and it's most often sold diced, about 1/4-3/8". If it's not fresh,
    >>>> it gets quite hard. I think that's the characteristic that puts
    >>>> people off citron if they've never had it freshly processed.
    >>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>> Wayne Boatwright @¿@¬ _____________________
    >>>
    >>> And thanks for this link -- I see they have pictured a citron of the
    >>> Buddah's hand variety, vs. Bugialli's pictured one he was making
    >>> glacee out of, which was not Buddah's hand. I'm going to keep this
    >>> link and perhaps order from there sometime. I keep hoping I'll see
    >>> one at the Asian market, too at some time. Now I think I'll be able
    >>> to recognize one -- but I'd probably have a hard time dealing with its
    >>> preparation. Dee Dee

    >>
    >> I don't know if it's really worth the trouble of candying one's own
    >> citron, orange peel, and lemon peel. I know it certainly isn't worth
    >> my time. If good quality product is available, I would definitely not
    >> do it. Having said that, much of what is carried in the average
    >> supermarket during the pre-holiday season is really awful.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Wayne Boatwright Õ¿Õ¬

    >
    > Pretty awful, indeed. It makes me (and DH) sick! I'm going to keep up
    > my watch for some - I always look in produce and other areas to see if
    > someone has imported some.
    >
    > I agree with you regarding one's time. Some things are worth it -- some
    > not. I would have to perfect my recipe before adding citron. Then, of
    > course, how would one tell if the recipe was perfect if one didn't have
    > perfect citron? Hmmm -- another puzzlement.
    > Dee Dee


    True enough. :)



    --
    Wayne Boatwright Õ¿Õ¬
    ________________________________________

    Okay, okay, I take it back! UnScrew you!
     
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