Classic Jewish menu for a wedding?



A

Aenuff

Guest
Hi

I have been asked to provide the catering for a wedding, one half of the parents are Jewish the
other half not. its the "not" half who are organising the wedding so I'm going on third-hand info
and they have no more idea than I do, which is very little!

Aside from the kosher/non-kosher element has anyone got any suggestions for food that will
impress guests? The budgets fairly tight, around £12 per head so ingredient cost of about £5
(GBP) per person.

Two dishes that have been requested ae "Chicken with Olives" and "Shakshuka". I don't think these
are specifically "Jewish" more middle-eastern. I have no ideas other than Googling so I'm hopeing
someone here can make sensible suggestions.

I need to provide a buffet for 100 people which will include 2 hot dishes that will suit a variety
of tastes but impress "the parents/grand parents".

Cheers

Tony
 
P

Penmart01

Guest
>"Aenuff" writes:
>
>I have been asked to provide the catering for a wedding, one half of the parents are Jewish the
>other half not.
>
>Aside from the kosher/non-kosher element has anyone got any suggestions for food that will
>impress guests? The budgets fairly tight, around £12 per head so ingredient cost of about £5
>(GBP) per person.

How much is £5 (GBP) in US dollars... guessing probably no more then $10; enough for hard salami on
rye w/mustard, potato salad, cole slaw, and maybe a pickle, sour tomato, and a Dr Brown's Cel-Ray...
keeping it kosher that's about all you're going to afford... hey, prepared properly I can be
impressed with that menu.

---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon
```````````` "Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
 
J

Julian9EHP

Guest
Hooray, somebody finally mentioned Dr. Brown's Cel-Ray tonic! I thought it was unique to one part of
Pittsburgh. ;-)
 
J

James A. Finley

Guest
"Aenuff" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Hi
>
> I have been asked to provide the catering for a wedding, one half of the parents are Jewish the
> other half not. its the "not" half who are
organising
> the wedding so I'm going on third-hand info and they have no more idea
than
> I do, which is very little!
>
> Aside from the kosher/non-kosher element has anyone got any suggestions
for
> food that will impress guests? The budgets fairly tight, around £12 per
head
> so ingredient cost of about £5 (GBP) per person.
>
> Two dishes that have been requested ae "Chicken with Olives" and "Shakshuka". I don't think these
> are specifically "Jewish" more middle-eastern. I have no ideas other than Googling so I'm hopeing
> someone here can make sensible suggestions.
>
> I need to provide a buffet for 100 people which will include 2 hot dishes that will suit a variety
> of tastes but impress "the parents/grand
parents".
>
> Cheers
>
> Tony
>
>

Ask at rec.food.cuisine.jewish.
 
S

SportKite1

Guest
>From: "Aenuff"

>Two dishes that have been requested ae "Chicken with Olives" and "Shakshuka". I don't think
>these are specifically "Jewish" more middle-eastern. I have no ideas other than Googling so I'm
>hopeing someone

IMHO Shakshuka doesn't lend itself to a buffet for 100 catered by one person. If I were doing this
I'd pass on this dish.

The chicken with olives sounds good as it is a braised dish and can be made in large quantities and
held well for a large crowd. It's also economical because you can use boneless thighs.

I think I'd go with the Mediteranean theme and offer Kefta (use beef or lamb mince - whichever is
less expensive) as the other meat/hot dish (with a spicy roux based sauce instead of one using
dairy). The rest of the menu can be balanced out by rice pilaf with sliced toasted almonds &
currants; lemony hummus; marinated chopped vegetable salad and warm pita bread.

This is a fairly economical menu and if you are a careful shopper and buy in bulk you should be able
to squeek by with your budget of a little over $9. US

Ellen
 
R

Ranee Mueller

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, "Aenuff"
<[email protected]> wrote:

> Two dishes that have been requested ae "Chicken with Olives" and "Shakshuka". I don't think these
> are specifically "Jewish" more middle-eastern. I have no ideas other than Googling so I'm hopeing
> someone here can make sensible suggestions.

Shakshuka as I know it is an Arabic (my parents are from Saudi Arabia) kind of scrambled
egg/frittata. When I was a kid, I didn't like it, called it dirty eggs and requested clean
eggs instead. My mom made it with sauteed onions, tomatoes, parsley, and sometimes ground beef
that had been cooked with onions and garlic, seasoned with salt and pepper and served the
whole lot with a kind of hot sauce made of pureed green chiles (small ones), garlic, onion,
tomatoes, and cilantro.

Regards, Ranee

--
Remove do not and spam to e-mail me.

"The God who made the world and everything in it, being Lord of heaven and earth, does not live in
shrines made by man." Acts 17:24
 
V

Virginia Tadrzy

Guest
"James A. Finley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
>snip
>
> Ask at rec.food.cuisine.jewish.
>
I second that. Most posters there are very knowledgable about such items and can tell you what can
and cannot be served at the same table. I wish you luck. this may be a trial, but a great learning
experience. Look at it from the vantage point of what you can take from this instead of how I can
just do it. -Ginny
 
B

Barry Grau

Guest
Ranee Mueller <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> In article <[email protected]>, "Aenuff" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> > Two dishes that have been requested ae "Chicken with Olives" and "Shakshuka". I don't think
> > these are specifically "Jewish" more middle-eastern. I have no ideas other than Googling so I'm
> > hopeing someone here can make sensible suggestions.
>
> Shakshuka as I know it is an Arabic (my parents are from Saudi Arabia) kind of scrambled
> egg/frittata. When I was a kid, I didn't like it, called it dirty eggs and requested clean eggs
> instead. My mom made it with sauteed onions, tomatoes, parsley, and sometimes ground beef that
> had been cooked with onions and garlic, seasoned with salt and pepper and served the whole lot
> with a kind of hot sauce made of pureed green chiles (small ones), garlic, onion, tomatoes, and
> cilantro.
>
> Regards, Ranee

Like falafel/taamia and baba ganoush, the Israelis have adopted shakshuka. I have a recipe for it in
a Jewish cookbook.

-bwg
 
B

Barry Grau

Guest
[email protected] (Julian9EHP) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> Hooray, somebody finally mentioned Dr. Brown's Cel-Ray tonic! I thought it was unique to one part
> of Pittsburgh. ;-)

No, I grew up in New York City, and it was my Uncle Morris's favorite. Being a kid, I preferred his
cream soda and black cherry soda.

-bwg
 
R

Ranee Mueller

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
[email protected] (Barry Grau) wrote:

> Like falafel/taamia and baba ganoush, the Israelis have
> adopted shakshuka. I have a recipe for it in a Jewish
> cookbook.

How is it made? Is it like I described, or something else
entirely? Just curious.

Regards, Ranee

--
Remove do not and spam to e-mail me.

"The God who made the world and everything in it, being Lord
of heaven and earth, does not live in shrines made by man."
Acts 17:24
 
B

Barry Grau

Guest
Ranee Mueller <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> In article
> <[email protected]>,
> [email protected] (Barry Grau) wrote:
>
> > Like falafel/taamia and baba ganoush, the Israelis have
> > adopted shakshuka. I have a recipe for it in a Jewish
> > cookbook.
>
> How is it made? Is it like I described, or something
> else entirely? Just curious.
>
> Regards, Ranee

As you described. My impression of "shakshouka" upon
seeing the recipe was eggs and vegetables "shaken"
together while cooking.

-bwg