Claud Butler Roubaix?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Rick, Dec 5, 2003.

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  1. Rick

    Rick Guest

    My LBS has the bike in the subject line for £399. I must admit, I do like
    it. However, the price seems to be the RRP, and like everyone, I like to feel I am getting at least
    a little bit of a bargain, rather than paying the full whack. Especially at this time of year,
    when there is much price cutting of last year's models going on.

    So do people think the Butler's worth the money (according to the salesman, it is the 2004 model,
    but he didn't appear very convincing, just agreed with me when I asked if it was)? I'm a beginner,
    and 14 stone, so frame weight doesn't make that much of a difference. However, it would be nice to
    have something that isn't of use *only* to beginners. I don't want to spend significantly more than
    that amount of money though, perhaps a max of £550. For which I could almost get a Saracen Aubisque
    (discounted), in the mag ads, though not at my local shops. Would that (or similar) be a much
    better bike?

    Also, this Butler has a double chainset. Would I suffer without a triple to get up hills, or
    would I quickly get used to it? I'm reasonably fit through doing a lot of running, but not
    cycling kind of fit.

    Be grateful for any advice. TIA!

    Richard
     
    Tags:


  2. IMO you would be better off spending the same money on a secondhand bike - you would get much more
    for your money.

    hth

    Chris

    On Wed, 26 Nov 2003 21:20:49 -0000, Rick <[email protected]> wrote:

    > My LBS has the bike in the subject line for £399. I must admit, I do like
    > it. However, the price seems to be the RRP, and like everyone, I like to feel I am getting at
    > least a little bit of a bargain, rather than paying the full whack. Especially at this time of
    > year, when there is much price cutting of last year's models going on.
    >
    > So do people think the Butler's worth the money (according to the salesman, it is the 2004 model,
    > but he didn't appear very convincing, just agreed with me when I asked if it was)? I'm a beginner,
    > and 14 stone, so frame weight doesn't make that much of a difference. However, it would be nice to
    > have something that isn't of use *only* to beginners. I don't want to spend significantly more
    > than that amount of money though, perhaps a max of £550. For which I could almost get a Saracen
    > Aubisque (discounted), in the mag ads, though not at my local shops. Would that (or similar) be a
    > much better bike?
    >
    > Also, this Butler has a double chainset. Would I suffer without a triple to get up hills, or
    > would I quickly get used to it? I'm reasonably fit through doing a lot of running, but not
    > cycling kind of fit.
    >
    > Be grateful for any advice. TIA!
    >
    > Richard
    >
    >

    --
    Using M2, Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/m2/
     
  3. Rick

    Rick Guest

    "turkeytickler" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:eek:[email protected]...
    > IMO you would be better off spending the same money on a secondhand bike - you would get much more
    > for your money.
    >
    > hth
    >
    > Chris

    Thanks for the reply, Chris. Of course, I realise I could get a much better bike second hand, but
    there are too many "ifs". *If* it has been well looked after (I don't know much about bikes
    mechanically), *if* I find a suitable one for sale with the right frame size, *if* there is one for
    sale in my local area, etc etc. I mean, I see many a nice bike in the classifieds in Cycling Weekly
    etc, but the ones I might be interested in tend to be in Hampshire or Scotland, etc, and I am in
    Nottingham! Plus, if anything wrong there is no guarantee or anything. That's what puts me off
    buying second hand. And at least in a shop, you can see a lot of bikes at the same time, whereas
    you have to spend a lot of time and money seeing private second hand bikes all over the place, one
    at a time.

    Thanks for the input, though.

    > On Wed, 26 Nov 2003 21:20:49 -0000, Rick <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > My LBS has the bike in the subject line for £399. I must admit, I do
    like
    > > it. However, the price seems to be the RRP, and like everyone, I like to feel I am getting at
    > > least a little bit of a bargain, rather than paying the full whack. Especially at this time
    > > of year, when there is much price cutting of last year's models going on.
    > >
    > > So do people think the Butler's worth the money (according to the salesman, it is the 2004
    > > model, but he didn't appear very convincing, just agreed with me when I asked if it was)? I'm a
    > > beginner, and 14 stone, so frame
    weight
    > > doesn't make that much of a difference. However, it would be nice to
    have
    > > something that isn't of use *only* to beginners. I don't want to spend significantly more than
    > > that amount of money though, perhaps a max of £550. For which I could almost get a Saracen
    > > Aubisque (discounted), in the mag ads, though not at my local shops. Would that (or similar) be
    > > a much better bike?
    > >
    > > Also, this Butler has a double chainset. Would I suffer without a triple to get up hills, or
    > > would I quickly get used to it? I'm reasonably fit through doing a lot of running, but not
    > > cycling kind of fit.
    > >
    > > Be grateful for any advice. TIA!
    > >
    > > Richard
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > Using M2, Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/m2/
     
  4. > Thanks for the reply, Chris. Of course, I realise I could get a much
    better
    > bike second hand, but there are too many "ifs". *If* it has been well
    looked
    > after (I don't know much about bikes mechanically), *if* I find a suitable one for sale with the
    > right frame size, *if* there is one for sale in my local area, etc etc. I mean, I see many a nice
    > bike in the classifieds in Cycling Weekly etc, but the ones I might be interested in tend to be in
    > Hampshire or Scotland, etc, and I am in Nottingham! Plus, if anything
    wrong
    > there is no guarantee or anything. That's what puts me off buying second hand. And at least in a
    > shop, you can see a lot of bikes at the same time, whereas you have to spend a lot of time and
    > money seeing private second
    hand
    > bikes all over the place, one at a time.

    Bought my bike second hand from the LBS. This meant it was cheaper and they gave it the full
    service, replacing parts that were worn etc. Also got set of lights and a lock thrown in so that
    knocked £40 of the selling price (I had to ask of course). LBS seemed really happy with the sale so
    perhaps I should have tried to knock the price down. Was slightly cheaper than equivalents in ebay
    too (they seem to be about the most expensive place to buy secondhand bikes). Only problem with
    buying second hand from LBS is that road bikes disappear *fast*.
     
  5. dailuggs

    dailuggs New Member

    Joined:
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    i too was looking a the cbr, but i think the cbm would be better

    give eBay a go- seems alright and these were the first 2 i found

    cbr:
    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3643075439&category=7298

    although you might wanna look at the cbm:
    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3643074793&category=7298

    20 quid postage and when it arrives id suggesting taking to LBS for a quick once over so add about 30 onto the price and you got a bargain!
     
  6. Yup I understand excatly what you mean about the ifs. A couple of things that I would say
    in response;

    1. Try your LBS (Local Bike Shop) for secondhand bikes. A decent shop wont let you out of the door
    with something unsuitable or unsafe. Sorry I dont know your area but if you ask around in this
    group for good shops in the Notts area im sure there will be plenty of people ready to recommend
    somewhere.

    2. A Claud Butler of any spec these days is a pretty low end machine that might well put you off
    cycling altogether. Im not being a snob here - the bikes are basically marketed to be pretty and
    not much else. The spec of the components used means that once you start to ride it hard or
    extensively you might end up with more mechanical problems with a brand new model than an older
    one with decent quality kit. I think they are owned by Falcon now (at least they were 10 years
    ago when I bought one of their mountain bikes) and they trade on the heritage and name rather
    than the quality of the product.

    Check out www.shimano-europe.com and www.campagnolo.com to get familiar with the "groupsets" that
    bikes come fitted with - this along with the frame specs (too varied to generalise) will be a good
    indicator of what you are buying. Im not too familiar with campag gear but shimano wise, anything in
    the 105/ultegra/dura ace bracket is good quality race or distance worthy kit that you can rely on to
    work well and be lightweight. The Tiagra and Sora groups are more aimed at the upper end of the
    leisure market and will still be perfectly good albeit heavier and maybe not so reliable (consisting
    of more plastic). My guess would be that £399 will get you a nice 3-4 year old bike with 105 bits.
    £550 will get you an ultegra equiped thoroughbred of a similar age. Be careful with aluminium frames
    at that age due to metal fatigue - i would go for a Reynolds 531 model - indestructible!

    Good luck in your search - and I would certainly echo the other contributors advice - steer well
    clear of eBay - unless you are selling ;-)

    Cheers

    Chris

    On Thu, 27 Nov 2003 21:08:53 -0000, Rick <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > "turkeytickler" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:eek:[email protected]...
    >> IMO you would be better off spending the same money on a secondhand bike - you would get much
    >> more for your money.
    >>
    >> hth
    >>
    >> Chris
    >
    > Thanks for the reply, Chris. Of course, I realise I could get a much better bike second hand, but
    > there are too many "ifs". *If* it has been well looked after (I don't know much about bikes
    > mechanically), *if* I find a suitable one for sale with the right frame size, *if* there is one
    > for sale in my local area, etc etc. I mean, I see many a nice bike in the classifieds in Cycling
    > Weekly etc, but the ones I might be interested in tend to be in Hampshire or Scotland, etc, and I
    > am in Nottingham! Plus, if anything wrong there is no guarantee or anything. That's what puts me
    > off buying second hand. And at least in a shop, you can see a lot of bikes at the same time,
    > whereas you have to spend a lot of time and money seeing private second hand bikes all over the
    > place, one at a time.
    >
    > Thanks for the input, though.
    >
    >
    >
    >> On Wed, 26 Nov 2003 21:20:49 -0000, Rick <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> > My LBS has the bike in the subject line for £399. I must admit, I do
    > like
    >> > it. However, the price seems to be the RRP, and like everyone, I like
    >> to
    >> > feel I am getting at least a little bit of a bargain, rather than
    >> paying
    >> > the full whack. Especially at this time of year, when there is much price cutting of last
    >> > year's models going on.
    >> >
    >> > So do people think the Butler's worth the money (according to the salesman, it is the 2004
    >> > model, but he didn't appear very convincing, just
    >> agreed
    >> > with me when I asked if it was)? I'm a beginner, and 14 stone, so frame
    > weight
    >> > doesn't make that much of a difference. However, it would be nice to
    > have
    >> > something that isn't of use *only* to beginners. I don't want to spend significantly more than
    >> > that amount of money though, perhaps a max of £550. For which I could almost get a Saracen
    >> > Aubisque (discounted), in the
    >> mag
    >> > ads, though not at my local shops. Would that (or similar) be a much better bike?
    >> >
    >> > Also, this Butler has a double chainset. Would I suffer without a
    >> triple
    >> > to get up hills, or would I quickly get used to it? I'm reasonably fit through doing a lot of
    >> > running, but not cycling kind of fit.
    >> >
    >> > Be grateful for any advice. TIA!
    >> >
    >> > Richard
    >> >
    >> >
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >> Using M2, Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/m2/
    >
    >

    --
    Using M2, Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/m2/
     
  7. Yup I understand excatly what you mean about the ifs. A couple of things that I would say
    in response;

    1. Try your LBS (Local Bike Shop) for secondhand bikes. A decent shop wont let you out of the door
    with something unsuitable or unsafe. Sorry I dont know your area but if you ask around in this
    group for good shops in the Notts area im sure there will be plenty of people ready to recommend
    somewhere.

    2. A Claud Butler of any spec these days is a pretty low end machine that might well put you off
    cycling altogether. Im not being a snob here - the bikes are basically marketed to be pretty and
    not much else. The spec of the components used means that once you start to ride it hard or
    extensively you might end up with more mechanical problems with a brand new model than an older
    one with decent quality kit. I think they are owned by Falcon now (at least they were 10 years
    ago when I bought one of their mountain bikes) and they trade on the heritage and name rather
    than the quality of the product.

    Check out www.shimano-europe.com and www.campagnolo.com to get familiar with the "groupsets" that
    bikes come fitted with - this along with the frame specs (too varied to generalise) will be a good
    indicator of what you are buying. Im not too familiar with campag gear but shimano wise, anything in
    the 105/ultegra/dura ace bracket is good quality race or distance worthy kit that you can rely on to
    work well and be lightweight. The Tiagra and Sora groups are more aimed at the upper end of the
    leisure market and will still be perfectly good albeit heavier and maybe not so reliable (consisting
    of more plastic). My guess would be that £399 will get you a nice 3-4 year old bike with 105 bits.
    £550 will get you an ultegra equiped thoroughbred of a similar age. Be careful with aluminium frames
    at that age due to metal fatigue - i would go for a Reynolds 531 model - indestructible!

    Good luck in your search - and I would certainly echo the other contributors advice - steer well
    clear of eBay - unless you are selling ;-)

    Cheers

    Chris

    On Thu, 27 Nov 2003 21:08:53 -0000, Rick <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > "turkeytickler" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:eek:[email protected]...
    >> IMO you would be better off spending the same money on a secondhand bike - you would get much
    >> more for your money.
    >>
    >> hth
    >>
    >> Chris
    >
    > Thanks for the reply, Chris. Of course, I realise I could get a much better bike second hand, but
    > there are too many "ifs". *If* it has been well looked after (I don't know much about bikes
    > mechanically), *if* I find a suitable one for sale with the right frame size, *if* there is one
    > for sale in my local area, etc etc. I mean, I see many a nice bike in the classifieds in Cycling
    > Weekly etc, but the ones I might be interested in tend to be in Hampshire or Scotland, etc, and I
    > am in Nottingham! Plus, if anything wrong there is no guarantee or anything. That's what puts me
    > off buying second hand. And at least in a shop, you can see a lot of bikes at the same time,
    > whereas you have to spend a lot of time and money seeing private second hand bikes all over the
    > place, one at a time.
    >
    > Thanks for the input, though.
    >
    >
    >
    >> On Wed, 26 Nov 2003 21:20:49 -0000, Rick <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> > My LBS has the bike in the subject line for £399. I must admit, I do
    > like
    >> > it. However, the price seems to be the RRP, and like everyone, I like
    >> to
    >> > feel I am getting at least a little bit of a bargain, rather than
    >> paying
    >> > the full whack. Especially at this time of year, when there is much price cutting of last
    >> > year's models going on.
    >> >
    >> > So do people think the Butler's worth the money (according to the salesman, it is the 2004
    >> > model, but he didn't appear very convincing, just
    >> agreed
    >> > with me when I asked if it was)? I'm a beginner, and 14 stone, so frame
    > weight
    >> > doesn't make that much of a difference. However, it would be nice to
    > have
    >> > something that isn't of use *only* to beginners. I don't want to spend significantly more than
    >> > that amount of money though, perhaps a max of £550. For which I could almost get a Saracen
    >> > Aubisque (discounted), in the
    >> mag
    >> > ads, though not at my local shops. Would that (or similar) be a much better bike?
    >> >
    >> > Also, this Butler has a double chainset. Would I suffer without a
    >> triple
    >> > to get up hills, or would I quickly get used to it? I'm reasonably fit through doing a lot of
    >> > running, but not cycling kind of fit.
    >> >
    >> > Be grateful for any advice. TIA!
    >> >
    >> > Richard
    >> >
    >> >
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >> Using M2, Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/m2/
    >
    >

    --
    Using M2, Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/m2/
     
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