Clearout due to Recumbent

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Fergus Flanagan, Mar 25, 2003.

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  1. Since i have now fully converted to recumbent cycling (the choice of discerning cyclists) it is time
    to have a clearout of those unwanted parts from my conventional bike stock. Most of what is for sale
    is from a custom built touring bike hence the woodrup frame. Not sure what is a fair price so have
    had a look thru my CTC mag and come up with some prices which you might pay at your LBS and what i
    think is fair. Email me if anything takes your fancy or you want to make a sensible offer.

    700c Wheels (done about 200 miles) Mavic SUP T217 Rims GBP25 each Shimano XT hubs GBP50(R) GBP25(F)
    Conti Top Touring 2000 tyres GBP16 each 8 speed block 11-28 GBP15 ASKING PRICE GBP90.00

    XT dual lever controls (8sp gear & brake) GBP85 pair XT v-brake set GBP31 each Shimano Deore rear
    derailleur GBP25 Tiagra 9sp front derailleur GBP15 ASKING PRICE GBP90.00

    Topeak rear carrier in black GBP25 ASKING PRICE GBP15.00

    Esge Mudguards set GBP25 ASKING PRICE GBP15.00

    25" 531 Raleigh Record Ace frameset 25" 531 Woodrup touring frame (seat tube and seat stays dented
    due to attempted theft) ASKING PRICE FOR BOTH GBP50

    Dotek FG-PRO6 triple chainset 26-??-52 GBP40 ASKING PRICE GBP20.00

    Handlebar similar to Pro Trekking Bar GBP25 ASKING PRICE GBP10.00

    Axa bottle dynamo and headlight (ideally for braze on dynamo mounts, otherwise needs bracket) GBP35
    ASKING PRICE GBP15.00

    Thule Roof bars (gutter fitting & locking), Pair of Thule bike racks (locking) ASKING PRICE GBP80.00

    Cheers

    Fergus BikeE HPVelotechnik StreetMachine

    --
    ::::: Only riders understand why dogs love to stick their heads out of car
    windows. :::::
     
    Tags:


  2. Should add that all the parts being offered have seen very little use and

    Cheers Fergus

    "Fergus Flanagan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Since i have now fully converted to recumbent cycling (the choice of discerning cyclists) it is
    > time to have a clearout of those unwanted parts from my conventional bike stock. Most of what
    > is for sale is from a custom built touring bike hence the woodrup frame. Not sure what is a
    > fair price
    so
    > have had a look thru my CTC mag and come up with some prices which you
    might
    > pay at your LBS and what i think is fair. Email me if anything takes your fancy or you want to
    > make a sensible offer.
    >
    > 700c Wheels (done about 200 miles) Mavic SUP T217 Rims GBP25 each Shimano XT hubs GBP50(R)
    > GBP25(F) Conti Top Touring 2000 tyres GBP16 each 8 speed block 11-28 GBP15 ASKING PRICE GBP90.00
    >
    > XT dual lever controls (8sp gear & brake) GBP85 pair XT v-brake set GBP31 each Shimano Deore rear
    > derailleur GBP25 Tiagra 9sp front derailleur GBP15 ASKING PRICE GBP90.00
    >
    > Topeak rear carrier in black GBP25 ASKING PRICE GBP15.00
    >
    > Esge Mudguards set GBP25 ASKING PRICE GBP15.00
    >
    > 25" 531 Raleigh Record Ace frameset 25" 531 Woodrup touring frame (seat tube and seat stays dented
    > due to attempted theft) ASKING PRICE FOR BOTH GBP50
    >
    > Dotek FG-PRO6 triple chainset 26-??-52 GBP40 ASKING PRICE GBP20.00
    >
    > Handlebar similar to Pro Trekking Bar GBP25 ASKING PRICE GBP10.00
    >
    > Axa bottle dynamo and headlight (ideally for braze on dynamo mounts, otherwise needs bracket)
    > GBP35 ASKING PRICE GBP15.00
    >
    > Thule Roof bars (gutter fitting & locking), Pair of Thule bike racks (locking) ASKING PRICE
    > GBP80.00
    >
    >
    > Cheers
    >
    > Fergus BikeE HPVelotechnik StreetMachine
    >
    > --
    > ::::: Only riders understand why dogs love to stick their heads out of car
    > windows. :::::
     
  3. Andy Welch

    Andy Welch Guest

    On 25-Mar-2003, "Fergus Flanagan" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Since i have now fully converted to recumbent cycling (the choice of discerning cyclists) it is
    > time to have a clearout of those unwanted parts

    Just out of interest, how long have you been riding your recumbents?

    I spent 18 months (including an end-to-end) with a StreetMachine followed by a year with a
    Windcheetah and have now decided to go back to an upright (at least for the time being). There were
    various points during those two and a half years where I thought I'd never ride an upright again
    (although I guess I kept comming back to it) so you might want to be a bit cautious about getting
    rid of all your upright stuff.

    Cheers,

    Andy
     
  4. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    [email protected] wrote in news:[email protected]:

    <snip>
    > I spent 18 months (including an end-to-end) with a StreetMachine followed by a year with a
    > Windcheetah and have now decided to go back to an upright (at least for the time being). <snip>

    Ooh! It's just as well Guy isn't talking to us for lent, or he'd stop talking to us for ever for
    spreading such sedition :)

    Out of interest, what is it that's made you change your mind? Is it that uprights are better suited
    to some of the conditions you want to ride in or something else?

    Graeme
     
  5. Andy Welch

    Andy Welch Guest

    On 25-Mar-2003, Graeme <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Ooh! It's just as well Guy isn't talking to us for lent, or he'd stop talking to us for ever for
    > spreading such sedition :)
    >

    Not being spoken to is the least of my worries. The dark side doesn't take kindly to traitors you
    know :) Although now that I'm sharing my bedroom with a six month old child who seems to have lost
    the knack of sleeping I'd view a horses head as light releif.

    > Out of interest, what is it that's made you change your mind? Is it that uprights are better
    > suited to some of the conditions you want to ride in

    Yes, pretty much. Although with a fair dose of psychology thrown in.

    Apart from the obvious need to sell your soul to the devil I've never really thought of recumbents
    and uprights as seperate machines. We all want a bike to be fast, comfortable and versatile.
    Unfortunately nobody has come up with a human powered machine that gives you all three so you just
    need to pick the appropriate trade-off for the task at hand. For all the talk of recumbents being
    the next big thing you have to remember that they've been around for a hundred years. If they were
    clearly better than an upright they would have taken over by now. That said, they are a perfectly
    sensible option for some situations.

    Personally I picked the StreetMachine when I was looking for a bike to use on a leisurely end-to-end
    trip. My primary desires were comfort, good luggage capacity and a bombproof construction. The
    StreetMachine gave me that in spades but once the trip was over and I went back to day rides in the
    hilly Aberdeenshire countryside and commuting I found the effort of hauling it up hill and the low
    speed stability anoying, so I sold it.

    The Windcheetah was used to allow me to commute through the winter on icy north-east roads while my
    wife (who was on maternity leave) used the car. Basically I needed a trike or a second car and it
    was no contest. The Windcheetah was huge fun and did what I wanted it to do admirably. However, the
    danger of ice has now pretty much passed and I'm back to hilly day rides. The Windcheetah was
    actually afster up hill than the StreetMachine but I still never enjoyed climbing on it. Somehow
    (and this is where the
    psychology comes in) I just prefer the feeling of powering up a hill on a light upright to sitting
    back and spinning. Maybe it's all those hours watching the pros. I'm also hoping to get myself
    into condition to ride the Etape next year (2004) so I need to do some serious training on a
    race bike.

    So that's my story, for what it's worth. Of course it isn't over. Once I've got the Etape out of my
    system I fancy having a go at some long distance events and may well return to a recumbent trike.
    But at the risk of offending Audax riders I think that a ride like Etape represents more of a
    physical challenge than a long Audax (which, from what I've read, seems to be more mental) so I want
    to tackle that while I still can.

    Cheers,

    Andy
     
  6. Hi Andy, Feel like i know you as i have been to your site a few times and found it very informative
    when considering whether i should buy a recumbent or not, damn now you have gone conventional on me
    i will have to sell the bent and buy a decent wedgie :) I have been cycling since i was 7 and apart
    from a patches the bike has been my main and most enjoyable form of transport. Did get into racing
    in my early 20s but didn't last too long due to a back condition that has apparent from the age of
    16. The incentive to go for a recumbent then was clear in my case and I cannot see myself going back
    to a conventional for the future. I have many memories of going on cycles with my local CTC group at
    the time and guaranted within a couple of hours during any cycle i would be standing on the pedals
    to try and relieve the pain in my back. Have often done day cycles/audax events ranging in distance
    from 50-300 miles and the memories of excrutiating pain won't be forgotten too easily. On these long
    rides saddle soreness was also a major discomfort as well as suffering a trapped nerve in my palm
    resulting in the loss of feeling around my thumb which occurred on a cycle thru the Swiss Alps, took
    3 months to get the feeling back. All these things have made me go the recumbent route but of course
    the proof of the pudding will be when i go touring later on this year for a couple of weeks
    hopefully in Scotland, in the meantime I shall be building up the mileage on my Streetmachine. I am
    not expecting the recumbent to be a panacea of all discomfort but to be honest so far i have to say
    it beats the hell out of wedgies but i have to emphasise this is my personal experience. Would i
    have choosen a bent without back problems? probably not and admire those that have just to see what
    its like. I have to say that giving a recumbent a shot at your cycling heart requires more than just
    going to your LBS and renting for a day or weekend especially when it comes to recumbents like the
    StreetMachine where the laid back positon is difficult to get used to relative to the
    semi-recumbents. Let me clarify, I originally rented the StreetMachine from Bikefix nearly 2 years
    ago for a day and a half and didn't really take to it like i hoped i would so the verdict was still
    out. Then i tried the BikeE semi-recumbent a fantastic machine for the city, and light touring and a
    great introduction to recumbents, this was my transport in London for about a year and was great
    (unfortunately BikeE is now not trading but take a look at the BikeFix website and see the HP
    Spirit), I remember the first time i rode it i felt like i was riding on a cloud. Then recently i
    spotted a secondhand Streetmachine for sale, went for a test ride and what a revelation! Had to have
    it! This is going to be my distance touring bike. I hope to do alot of touring and speed is not a
    priority for me but comfort definitely is. I know my hill climbing and speed will get better but i
    guess because i know that wedgies are not an optiion for me anymore the choice is clear cut. As to
    why bents are not as popular as wedgies alot probably has to do with the rules adhered to by the
    racing fraternity of what was and wasn't legal, this has now firmly embedded itself in the physche
    of what a bike should look like throughout right down to the casual cyclist.

    Anyway i have really been waffling on, but Andy can you give me the link for the Etape as this is
    certainly something i could consider doing next year

    All the Best Fergus
     
  7. Eatmorepies

    Eatmorepies Guest

    As to why bents are not as popular as wedgies alot probably has
    > to do with the rules adhered to by the racing fraternity of what was and wasn't legal, this has
    > now firmly embedded itself in the physche of what a bike should look like throughout right down to
    > the casual cyclist.

    Also - you can't look over the hedges.

    John
     
  8. Andy Welch

    Andy Welch Guest

    On 25-Mar-2003, "Eatmorepies" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Also - you can't look over the hedges.

    True there are a couple of hedges dotted around the country that are too high to see over when
    riding a StreetMachine but low enough to see over on an upright. But if you compare the head height
    for riders of StreetMachine's and uprights you'll see that the number of hedges that fit into this
    category is actually pretty small. Now factor in the fact that on an upright you are basically
    looking at the road but in a recumbent your head is vertical and I think it would be hard to argue
    that an upright is really a better option for enjoying the view.

    Cheers,

    Andy
     
  9. Andy Welch

    Andy Welch Guest

    On 25-Mar-2003, "Fergus Flanagan" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Hi Andy, Feel like i know you as i have been to your site a few times and found it very
    > informative when considering whether i should buy a recumbent or not, damn now you have gone
    > conventional on me i will have to sell the bent and buy a decent wedgie :)

    Glad you found the ramblings on my web page useful. I guess I should update them sometime. But it
    sounds as though you have a very good reason for using a recumbent. For those people who find riding
    an upright unbearably painful (or even just too painful to be enjoyable) a recumbent is a fantastic
    solution. I'm sure you'll have a great time touring on it. I certainly enjoyed my three week trundle
    from John O'Groats to Lands End using a variety of routes from minor roads to forrest tracks. The
    gearing is possibly a fraction high for loaded touring (something like 26,38,48 up front might be
    better) but stability at low speed is an issue so you might not be able to use the lower gears
    anyway. I know Mike Burrows reckons that 9 speed is plenty for a two wheel bent and advocates
    getting off and pushing if you can't ride above 4mph. Also, despite carrying two fair sized panniers
    I managed to get the StreetMachine up all bar a couple of hills, including one that was signed 1:3
    in Cornwall. Felt like death at the top mind and I could have walked it quicker but there was a
    certain sense of achievement.

    Your experience with the StreetMachine and BikeE at BikeFix is interesting. I've always been a bit
    sceptical of the advice to aspiring recumbent riders to test ride everyting. I tend to think that if
    you do that you just end up picking the bike that is easiest to ride straight off. This option may
    not be the best for you in the long run. So I've always put as much faith in the experiences of
    owners as in short test rides.

    As for Etape, there is quite a lot of stuff on the Web about it and Cycling Plus are currently doing
    a series charting the experiences of a returning cyclist who aims to ride this years event. But the
    link below is probably as good a place as any to start.

    http://www.velovista.net/Etape_du_Tour.htm

    Don't think there are many bents in the field though. In fact I'm not sure if they are permitted.
    Maybe you could be the first.

    Cheers,

    Andy
     
  10. Eatmorepies

    Eatmorepies Guest

    > True there are a couple of hedges dotted around the country that are too high to see over when
    > riding a StreetMachine but low enough to see over on an upright. But if you compare the head
    > height for riders of
    StreetMachine's
    > and uprights you'll see that the number of hedges that fit into this category is actually pretty
    > small. Now factor in the fact that on an
    upright
    > you are basically looking at the road but in a recumbent your head is vertical and I think it
    > would be hard to argue that an upright is really a better option for enjoying the view.

    We must ride very different uprights - I guess you are writing about drop bar machines. Sorry -
    I never mentioned I ride a mountain bike on the road. (I also ride a different mountain bike
    off road).

    My roadified Pine Mountain has flat bars and smooth roady tyres. I sit upright and when pootling
    gently round the lanes I am able to cast glances over the hedges and take in the scenery.

    John
     
  11. Hi

    Just to provide a slightly alternative view to the merits of a Streetmachine:

    I bought a Streetmachine GT in 1999 and haven't looked back. I find it supremely comfortable and
    whilst not the fastest recumbent out there, certainly able to hold its own on flats and downhill in
    relation to most other cyclists. Obviously one doesn't have the option of powering uphill, Lance
    Armstrong style, but I've never really had any problems even when loaded (the Streetmachine's
    ability to carry 4 full size panniers is something to note for cycle tourists).

    With regards to stability, I'm not sure which problems you refer to. I've yet to test the
    Streetmachine's minimum speed (no perceived need to!), but 4 kph (2.5 mph) isn't a problem. But
    then, when are you seriously going to need to go so slowly? In my experience a typical climbing
    speed (for example) tends to be around 8-10 kph.

    Regards,

    Peter
     
  12. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

  13. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Eatmorepies wrote:

    > We must ride very different uprights - I guess you are writing about drop bar machines. Sorry -
    > I never mentioned I ride a mountain bike on the road. (I also ride a different mountain bike
    > off road).

    No, even on a sit-up-and-beg Brompton my view tends to the road more than on the Streetmachine, and
    it's also certainly the case on my MTB. I only really noticed the difference in view when I'd
    experienced it, and like seat comfort I'd been quite convinced there was precious little improvement
    to be had on my upright before I changed.

    As Andy says, the number of hedges you can't see over on a Streetmachine that you can see over on an
    upright is pretty minimal. My experience is I see far more of the countryside on my Streetmachine
    than I ever do on my MTB (or tourer, or folder).

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  14. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Peter Sheaf (DEV) wrote:

    > I bought a Streetmachine GT in 1999 and haven't looked back. I find it supremely comfortable and
    > whilst not the fastest recumbent out there, certainly able to hold its own on flats and downhill
    > in relation to most other cyclists.

    Indeed. Downhill I can regularly outpace racers (people and machines!), especially if it's a more
    "interesting" backroad with bumps and holes and mud where the touring tyres and suspension really
    improve matters over racing kit. Into the wind I do noticeably better as well. Only had a brief go
    on a Speedmachine, but that must be seriously whizzy in the right conditions!

    > loaded (the Streetmachine's ability to carry 4 full size panniers is something to note for cycle
    > tourists).

    Not only that, but with the lowrider rack where it is you can get heavy stuff under the rider
    between the wheels, so effect on handling is practically nothing (it might even improve high speed
    cornering, which is superb to start with...). I find it far nicer to ride laden than my old upright
    tourer, which takes on rather different handling when it's got 4 loaded panniers on board. Trip to a
    local winery yesterday I had 4 bottles of wine and 8 of beer in the lowriders and noticed no effect
    on the handling whatsoever, and that just wouldn't happen with conventional lowriders.

    > With regards to stability, I'm not sure which problems you refer to. I've yet to test the
    > Streetmachine's minimum speed (no perceived need to!), but 4 kph (2.5 mph) isn't a problem. But
    > then, when are you seriously going to need to go so slowly? In my experience a typical climbing
    > speed (for example) tends to be around 8-10 kph.

    That'll depend on the hills, of course. Typical examples I can motor up quite happily, nastier
    ones I'd be very happy to keep up 8-10 km/h on! For really bitchin' hills I do find I weave about
    a bit more than I did on the old upright, but not to the extent I think of myself as out of
    reasonable control.

    I'm really pleased with it. If I could rewind to the buying decision the only thing I'd change is
    I'd want to think harder about a Rohloff (didn't know about them then). I haven't seen any other
    bikes that have made me think, "I should've got one of those instead". (Mine's got both racks,
    propstand, 'guards, the Schmidt/B&M lights and the airflow seat cushion on top of the basic spec,
    all recommended.)

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  15. Andy Welch

    Andy Welch Guest

    On 28-Mar-2003, "Peter Sheaf \(DEV\)" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > With regards to stability, I'm not sure which problems you refer to. I've yet to test the
    > Streetmachine's minimum speed (no perceived need to!), but 4 kph (2.5 mph) isn't a problem. But
    > then, when are you seriously going to need to go so slowly? I

    I'm afraid that, with the way threading is handled on my newsreader (particularly if there are lots
    of replies to one message), it is not clear whether you are refering to my comment on low speed
    stability. But if it is then I should clarify that I wasn't just thinking of hill climbing speed.
    There was the odd steep hill where I would start to weave a bit but not that many. In general I
    found low speed stability more of an issue when negotiating heavy traffic. In this situation there
    was a lot of stop start and a fair bit of trying to inch forward at the same speed of the traffic
    (when it wasn't possible/safe to filter). This is what I found difficult on the StreetMachine. Not a
    problem on the trike of course.

    Cheers,

    Andy
     
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