Climbing Improvement

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Ken Papai, Mar 6, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Nick Burns

    Nick Burns Guest

    Just from what I observe, yes. In the cycling groups I ride with, the people that once took pride in
    disciplined eating are now certified weight weenies with regard to the bikes they ride. It is common
    for them train on bikes that are lighter than what Tour winners use on flat stages. People are
    actually smug about training on equipment that was originally designed for mountain time trials.
    Ever since Riis won the Tour, racers (lower categories) are more interested in emulating his bike
    than his physique.

    One dude I know was complaining about the poor customer service of AX-Lightness and ADA wheels. (For
    those that don't know, AX-Lighness makes custom saddles that are all under 100 grams and usually are
    just a carbon fiber shell). The owner\builder of ADA wheels told him to get lost, and this dude was
    surprised. Now he is stuck training on ZIPP 404s.

    "one of the six billion" <[email protected]> wrote in message:
    >
    > Is the US lifestyle really that different from 9 years ago? Are people really eating that much
    > more and exercising that much less than only a few years ago? I wonder if there's some element in
    > the corporate foodstuffs that's causing it. Like maybe GMO foods, or some new version of trans
    fat,
    > or some new fangled hormone in meat, etc...
    >
    >
    >
     


  2. Nick Burns

    Nick Burns Guest

    That rate of vertical velocity is impressive on OLH because of the constant changes in slope. I can
    climb at that rate, but not on that road.

    "VeloCat" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > Mark Fennell wrote:
    > >
    > > Alternatively, if you're too cheap to buy a power device (like me), get a topo map and figure
    > > out the elevation change of your hills. You better be able to climb at ~75 ft/minute elevation
    > > change for the longer climbs and ~90-100 ft/minute for the shorter ones, otherwise you will be
    > > chasing the first group down the other side.
    > >
    > > Mark
    >
    > So at 75ft/min, a typical time up Old LaHonda would be 17:12 (1290 ft elevation change). I find
    > this hard to believe since at a recent AV hillclimb event the BEST time was 17:40. OLH has an
    > average grade of
    > 7.2%, what type of grade were you suggesting at 75'/min?
     
  3. Joe Yannie

    Joe Yannie Guest

    "Mike S." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Joe Yannie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > So does that mean my 5'9 145lbs should be moving to the track? I can
    keep
    > > my heartrate in the 190's for a couple minutes. I am be pretty aero to boot.
    > >
    >
    > I don't think the banking's high enough for you to have any advantage climbing it.
    >
    > A little track workout now and again could do wonders for the rest of your riding...
    >
    > Mike
    >
    You should try the Mike Walden Velodrome in Rochester, MI....200m long. Steep Steep. But wayyy
    short. Anyone know the closest one to D.C.?

    "I am be"...you'd think I graduated from a respected university.
     
  4. "Danny Callen" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    >
    > That's what I was asking you. My wife works for an outwardly gay man and
    he
    > loves the mag. Do I need to spell it out any clearer. It's like being a fattie and admitting it.
    > There's nothing wrong with being gay; but not admitting is sad...

    Sorry to disappoint you but I'm not gay.

    I wish that I was bi, so there would be that many more opportunities to get the rocks off, but
    unfortunately, photos of the Fattie New England Masters Pro just don't do the job.
     
  5. warren <[email protected]> wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, Danny Callen <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Interesting.... all the New England states are ahead of California..

    > California is skewed, in a way, by a relatively high percentage of one or two ethnic groups that
    > tend towards obesity.

    For shame, Warren. That is a terribly prejudiced way to talk about SoCal Masters.

    > If you want to live in a culture that encourages fitness (most) of CA is much better than New
    > England in this regard. And why shouldn't it be? We can ride or do stuff outside 330+ days a year
    > and Dunkin' Donuts has not yet infiltrated widespread areas of California. And if you don't like
    > to exercise to get a "fit" shape we have the highest number of liposuction and body-shaping
    > surgeons in the US. And can I tell you? You... loook...mahvelous!

    When I moved to LA a while ago, I was prepared to encounter health food fads, juice bars and so on,
    but I was surprised to discover that in addition Los Angeles is also the Hamburger Capitol of the
    World. (Not that this is a bad thing.) Regional stereotypes can't explain everything here. Anyway,
    California is also ahead of New England in encouraging people to drive everywhere ...
     
  6. Danny Callen

    Danny Callen Guest

    "Kurgan Gringioni" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Danny Callen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > >
    > >
    > > That's what I was asking you. My wife works for an outwardly gay man and
    > he
    > > loves the mag. Do I need to spell it out any clearer. It's like being a fattie and admitting it.
    > > There's nothing wrong with being gay; but not admitting is sad...
    >
    >
    >
    > Sorry to disappoint you but I'm not gay.
    >
    > I wish that I was bi, so there would be that many more opportunities to
    get
    > the rocks off, but unfortunately, photos of the Fattie New England Masters Pro just don't do
    > the job.
    >
    >

    I'm not dissapointed Henry. Please keep your rocks to yourself. If you're really not gay I would
    suggest that you at least cancel that "Men's Fitness" subscription. Actually, I think you do like
    fatties and thought it was "Mens Fatness" magazine didn't you?

    Danny Callen
     
  7. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "Joe Yannie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Mike S." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > "Joe Yannie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > So does that mean my 5'9 145lbs should be moving to the track? I can
    > keep
    > > > my heartrate in the 190's for a couple minutes. I am be pretty aero
    to
    > > > boot.
    > > >
    > >
    > > I don't think the banking's high enough for you to have any advantage climbing it.
    > >
    > > A little track workout now and again could do wonders for the rest of
    your
    > > riding...
    > >
    > > Mike
    > >
    > You should try the Mike Walden Velodrome in Rochester, MI....200m long. Steep Steep. But wayyy
    > short. Anyone know the closest one to D.C.?
    >
    > "I am be"...you'd think I graduated from a respected university.
    >
    >
    T-Town, until (if?) the one in Baltimore gets built. I actually owned a fixed gear/track bike in the
    DC area, but didn't want to drive the 4+ hours to T-town just to try something... Faster and less
    expensive to go out to Reston and have Nima & Co. kick your arse.

    Mike
     
  8. Steve

    Steve Guest

    On 3/8/03 4:31 PM, in article [email protected], "Benjamin Weiner"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > warren <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> In article <[email protected]>, Danny Callen <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Interesting.... all the New England states are ahead of California..
    >
    >> California is skewed, in a way, by a relatively high percentage of one or two ethnic groups that
    >> tend towards obesity.
    >
    > For shame, Warren. That is a terribly prejudiced way to talk about SoCal Masters.

    Look! His name is weiner.......he he......he he

    >
    >
    >> If you want to live in a culture that encourages fitness (most) of CA is much better than New
    >> England in this regard. And why shouldn't it be? We can ride or do stuff outside 330+ days a
    >> year and Dunkin' Donuts has not yet infiltrated widespread areas of California. And if you don't
    >> like to exercise to get a "fit" shape we have the highest number of liposuction and body-shaping
    >> surgeons in the US. And can I tell you? You... loook...mahvelous!
    >
    > When I moved to LA a while ago, I was prepared to encounter health food fads, juice bars and so
    > on, but I was surprised to discover that in addition Los Angeles is also the Hamburger Capitol of
    > the World. (Not that this is a bad thing.) Regional stereotypes can't explain everything here.
    > Anyway, California is also ahead of New England in encouraging people to drive everywhere ...
     
  9. one of the six billion <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Is the US lifestyle really that different from 9 years ago? Are people really eating that much
    > more and exercising that much less than only a few years ago? I wonder if there's some element in
    > the corporate foodstuffs that's causing it. Like maybe GMO foods, or some new version of trans
    > fat, or some new fangled hormone in meat, etc...

    I don't think any of the food's changed, it's portion sizes and habits.

    from http://www.starbucks.com/aboutus/timeline.asp

    year # starbucks stores 1971 1 1987 17 1988 33 1989 55 1990 84 1991 116 1992 165 1993 272 1994 425
    1995 676 1996 1015 1997 1412 1998 1886 1999 2135 2000 3501 2001 4709 2002 5886

    Now, I'm not saying Starbucks is making you fat (though if you have too many venti frappucinos you
    will certainly get fat) but this could be evidence that a) what people regard as "standard" does
    change (can you even remember the first time you saw a Starbucks?) and b) the eat on-the-go, grab
    something and get back in the car, etc. lifestyle proliferates. And hey, I'm not blaming Starbucks,
    I'm OK with it; the coffee isn't perfect, but in many places decent coffee was unavailable before.
    But this "venti" crap has gotta stop.

    -Ben Starbucks is PEOPLE! It's made of PEOPLE!!!
     
  10. Benjamin Weiner wrote:
    >
    > Starbucks is PEOPLE! It's made of PEOPLE!!!

    living in seattle, i found the following lewis black bit very very very funny. don't know if it will
    speak to you in the same way, but what the heck-

    "I made an extraordinary discovery. It's kind of overwhelming... You see, I travel a lot and the
    fact of the matter is, in my travels I found out something that changed the way I look at things.
    From the beginning of time man has looked at the heavens and firmly believed the universe ends out
    in space. It's not true. The end of the universe happens to be in the United States. I have seen it.
    And, oddly enough, it's in Houston, Texas. I know, I know; I was shocked too.

    I left a comedy club there and walked down the street. On one corner there was a Starbucks. And
    across the street from that Starbucks, in the exact same building as that Starbucks, was a
    Starbucks.

    At first I thought the sun was playing tricks with my eyes. But no, there was a Starbucks... Across
    from a Starbucks. And that, my friends, is the end of the universe.

    People said to me, "How do you know," and I said, "Go there, stand between those two Starbucks, look
    at your watch. Time stands still. And if you turn this way and look just at this Starbucks,
    immediately you think, 'You know when I turn around there can not possibly be a Starbucks behind me.
    No one would've been that stupid to have build a Starbucks across from a Starbucks. And if there was
    a just and loving god, he wouldn't allow that kind of shit to go down.'

    So, you turn slowly, thinking 'Well, I'll see a Gap or a Denny's maybe even a Mobil station'. BUT
    THERE'S A STARBUCKS! People say, do we have too many Starbucks? Now we know. When you build a
    Starbucks across from a Starbucks, the game is over. You can build no more."
     
  11. heather halvorson <[email protected]> writes:

    > Benjamin Weiner wrote:
    > >
    > > Starbucks is PEOPLE! It's made of PEOPLE!!!
    >
    > living in seattle, i found the following lewis black bit very very very funny. don't know if it
    > will speak to you in the same way, but what the heck- "...When you build a Starbucks across from a
    > Starbucks, the game is over. You can build no more."

    http://go.vicinity.com/starbucksd/GeoFindUS.dsp?AD2=&AD3=92121&AD4=USA

    Sorrento Court - San Diego 9430 Scranton Road Suite #103 San Diego, CA 92121 United States
    (858) 452-3035

    Mira Mesa & Scranton, San Diego 9276 Scranton Blvd.
    #105
    San Diego, CA 921211750 United States 858-458-6885

    -Gerard
     
  12. Kyle Legate

    Kyle Legate Guest

    "heather halvorson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > I left a comedy club there and walked down the street. On one corner there was a Starbucks. And
    > across the street from that Starbucks, in the exact same building as that Starbucks, was a
    > Starbucks.
    >
    You think that's funny, but just wait. Anyone who comes to Hamilton for Worlds, take note of the
    number of Tim Hortons. Four blocks away from my house, there were three Tim Hortons' at the same
    intersection until earlier in the week, when the gas station housing one of them got torn
    down....probably to make way for a bigger Tim Hortons. We shouldn't miss a single Tims there,
    though...there are three more within half a kilometre, and I think I might be missing some.
     
  13. Danny Callen

    Danny Callen Guest

    "Kyle Legate" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "heather halvorson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > I left a comedy club there and walked down the street. On one corner there was a Starbucks. And
    > > across the street from that Starbucks, in the exact same building as that Starbucks, was a
    > > Starbucks.
    > >
    > You think that's funny, but just wait. Anyone who comes to Hamilton for Worlds, take note of the
    > number of Tim Hortons. Four blocks away from my house, there were three Tim Hortons' at the same
    > intersection until
    earlier
    > in the week, when the gas station housing one of them got torn down....probably to make way for a
    > bigger Tim Hortons. We shouldn't miss a single Tims there, though...there are three more within
    > half a kilometre, and I think I might be missing some.
    >
    >

    What is a "Tim Hortons"? Is that like a Canadian "Stuckeys"?

    Danny Callen
     
  14. heather halvorson <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Benjamin Weiner wrote:

    > > Starbucks is PEOPLE! It's made of PEOPLE!!!

    > living in seattle, i found the following lewis black bit very very very funny. don't know if it
    > will speak to you in the same way, but what the heck-

    In the case of Starbucks, we are all Seattleites now.

    > People said to me, "How do you know," and I said, "Go there, stand between those two Starbucks,
    > look at your watch. Time stands still. And if you turn this way and look just at this Starbucks,
    > immediately you think, 'You know when I turn around there can not possibly be a Starbucks behind
    > me. No one would've been that stupid to have build a Starbucks across from a Starbucks. And if
    > there was a just and loving god, he wouldn't allow that kind of shit to go down.'

    > So, you turn slowly, thinking 'Well, I'll see a Gap or a Denny's maybe even a Mobil station'. BUT
    > THERE'S A STARBUCKS! People say, do we have too many Starbucks? Now we know. When you build a
    > Starbucks across from a Starbucks, the game is over. You can build no more."

    Yeah, if only, there is always a spot for another Starbucks, check out this cartoon:

    http://archive.salon.com/comics/knig/1998/06/03knig.html

    and

    http://www.langston.com/Fun_People/1998/1998ANV.html

    and you think it's funny but then:

    http://www.theonion.com/onion3709/starbucks_phase_two.html "Starbucks To Begin Sinister `Phase Two'
    Of Operation"

    -Ben FEAR the Starbucks.
     
  15. Benjamin Weiner wrote:
    >

    > In the case of Starbucks, we are all Seattleites now.

    oh god, what was i thinking? you're right. i used to go there constantly in the early and mid 90's
    and my friend roasted for them. i feel somehow responsible. sorry!

    > http://www.theonion.com/onion3709/starbucks_phase_two.html "Starbucks To Begin Sinister `Phase
    > Two' Of Operation"

    "Lines drawn between the various stores form geometric patterns across the U.S., including
    five-pointed stars, Masonic symbols, and, in the Seattle area, the image of a gigantic Oroborous
    serpent wrapped around an inverted ziggurat."

    so, see- seattle really does have a lot of starbucks...

    > -Ben FEAR the Starbucks.

    nah, starbucks is just there to distract you from microsoft. (i guess they used to have bike racing
    on the microsoft campus, but that was before i knew it was a sport, so i never saw it happen.)

    heather
     
  16. "Benjamin Weiner" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > one of the six billion <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Is the US lifestyle really that different from 9 years ago? Are people really eating that much
    > > more and exercising that much less than only a
    few
    > > years ago? I wonder if there's some element in the corporate foodstuffs that's causing it. Like
    > > maybe GMO foods, or some new version of trans
    fat,
    > > or some new fangled hormone in meat, etc...
    >
    > I don't think any of the food's changed, it's portion sizes and habits.
    >
    > from http://www.starbucks.com/aboutus/timeline.asp
    >
    > year # starbucks stores 1971 1 1987 17 1988 33 1989 55 1990 84 1991 116 1992 165 1993 272 1994 425
    > 1995 676 1996 1015 1997 1412 1998 1886 1999 2135 2000 3501 2001 4709 2002 5886
    >
    > Now, I'm not saying Starbucks is making you fat (though if you have too many venti frappucinos you
    > will certainly get fat) but this could be evidence that a) what people regard as "standard" does
    > change (can you even remember the first time you saw a Starbucks?) and b) the eat on-the-go, grab
    > something and get back in the car, etc. lifestyle proliferates. And hey, I'm not blaming
    > Starbucks, I'm OK with it; the coffee isn't perfect, but in many places decent coffee was
    > unavailable before. But this "venti" crap has gotta stop.
    >
    > -Ben Starbucks is PEOPLE! It's made of PEOPLE!!!
    >
    >

    Another observation I've recently made - Parents who use food to control their kids. On more than
    one occasion I've seen a parent give their kid cookies/candy/other junk to shut them up. These kids
    also tend to be on the hyper / undisciplined side. What a great message they're sending.

    -T
     
  17. Kyle Legate

    Kyle Legate Guest

    "Danny Callen" <[email protected]> wrote in message >
    > What is a "Tim Hortons"? Is that like a Canadian "Stuckeys"?
    >
    I dunno what a stuckeys is. Tim Hortons is a Canadian chain of donut shops, with guaranteed
    _fresh_ coffee.
     
  18. Danny Callen

    Danny Callen Guest

    "Kyle Legate" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Danny Callen" <[email protected]> wrote in message >
    > > What is a "Tim Hortons"? Is that like a Canadian "Stuckeys"?
    > >
    > I dunno what a stuckeys is. Tim Hortons is a Canadian chain of donut
    shops,
    > with guaranteed _fresh_ coffee.
    >
    >

    sorry Kyle, a "Stuckeys" is a roadside coffee, gift shop and greasy spoon chain in the southern US.

    Danny Callen
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...