climbing off road ...

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Elyob, Sep 10, 2003.

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  1. Elyob

    Elyob Guest

    So, what type of cyclist are you? Do you stay in your seat or do you get up and stomp on the pedals?

    The reason I ask, is that I'm desperately trying to beat 50 minutes for my 12 1/4 mile on/off road
    route. I managed 51m11s yesterday, having dropped from 1h07m when I started a little while back.
    There's a couple of hills where I normally stay seated, but I'm trying getting out of the seat, but
    am finding it's a different muscle group and the switch back to seated needs to be timed well.

    The one thing that really does speed me up, is seeing someone ahead of me, and trying to catch them
    up and beat them. It took me 2 miles to catch this bike yesterday, but it was on the hill that I
    made most of my catch up. I also recovered quicker at the top, and took off past him. I'm just too
    competetive ;)

    Hey, hey, hey, looks like I'm getting fit again :) Now to lose some weight. I sweat like a horse
    during my cycle, but don't see to lose any weight whatsoever .. :( I presume this is because muscle
    is heavier than fat?

    Nick
     
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  2. Lee

    Lee Guest

    "elyob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > Hey, hey, hey, looks like I'm getting fit again :) Now to lose some
    weight.
    > I sweat like a horse during my cycle, but don't see to lose any weight whatsoever .. :( I presume
    > this is because muscle is heavier than fat?
    >
    > Nick
    >
    >

    Im desperately trying to lose weight too - i sweat like a pee eye gee.

    I havent lost any weight at the moment and its frustrating!

    Lee
     
  3. elyob tried to scribble ...

    > So, what type of cyclist are you? Do you stay in your seat or do you get up and stomp on
    > the pedals?

    Depends how I feel and the situation. Some hills are technical and slow, so I ride them in the
    saddle mostly. Some are faster and are generally taken stood up, some need standing or seated at
    different points .. ;) I don't think anyone could categorically say they either sit or stand for
    every hill, unless they have a problem standing and pedalling maybe .. ;)

    > The reason I ask, is that I'm desperately trying to beat 50 minutes for my 12 1/4 mile on/off road
    > route. I managed 51m11s yesterday, having dropped from 1h07m when I started a little while back.
    > There's a couple of hills where I normally stay seated, but I'm trying getting out of the seat,
    > but am finding it's a different muscle group and the switch back to seated needs to be timed well.

    Try a lower gear and spinning faster. When you get used to it, and it can take a while, then go up a
    gear, but try to remain at the same cadence. Speed comes when technique improves.

    > The one thing that really does speed me up, is seeing someone ahead of me, and trying to catch
    > them up and beat them. It took me 2 miles to catch this bike yesterday, but it was on the hill
    > that I made most of my catch up. I also recovered quicker at the top, and took off past him. I'm
    > just too competetive ;)

    Heheheh .. ;)

    > Hey, hey, hey, looks like I'm getting fit again :) Now to lose some weight. I sweat like a horse
    > during my cycle, but don't see to lose any weight whatsoever .. :( I presume this is because
    > muscle is heavier than fat?

    Dunno, but I found I lost a fair bit of weight quickly, for a while weight loss fluctuated, then
    eventually it settled down to a steady loss, now I'm at a level I'm more comfortable with and which
    is relatively constant on a weekly basis but is dropping on a monthly basis by about a pound or so.
    I still sweat like the fat git I was/am .. ;)

    --
    Digweed
     
  4. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    elyob wrote:
    > So, what type of cyclist are you? Do you stay in your seat or do you get up and stomp on
    > the pedals?

    Used to be out of the seat lots. Then I switched to recumbents for road use and *had* to spin my way
    up things. Switching back to an upright, I now find I spin up things far more than I used to. Unless
    I'm absolutely in a short-term hurry or have run out of gears, I'll stay in the seat as much as I
    can now. Works better for me, off road or on.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  5. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    elyob <[email protected]> wrote:
    : So, what type of cyclist are you? Do you stay in your seat or do you get up and stomp on
    : the pedals?

    Ah, off road, tricky.

    If it's a loose surface you have to stay seated for the traction. Soft suspension (esp full-sus) can
    also make staying seated and keeping the power down the way to go.

    Otherwise it can often be quicker (but harder work) to attack a short hill stood up and stomping the
    pedals. Keep the bike moving over the crest of the hill so that you keep your speed and then recover
    once you are up to speed again.

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org "Techolibertarians make a philosophy out of a personality defect"
    - Paulina Borsook
     
  6. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Lee muttered:

    [snipped...]

    > Im desperately trying to lose weight too - i sweat like a pee eye gee.
    >
    > I havent lost any weight at the moment and its frustrating!

    Try eating less... ;-)

    --
    bob [at] bobarnott [dot] com http://www.bobarnott.com/
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    "Crash programs fail because they are based on theory that, with nine women pregnant, you can get a
    baby in a month."
    -- Wernher von Braun
     
  7. Lee

    Lee Guest

    "Bob" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Lee muttered:
    >
    > [snipped...]
    >
    > > Im desperately trying to lose weight too - i sweat like a pee eye gee.
    > >
    > > I havent lost any weight at the moment and its frustrating!
    >
    > Try eating less... ;-)
    >
    > --
    > bob [at] bobarnott [dot] com
    http://www.bobarnott.com/
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------
    --
    > "Crash programs fail because they are based on theory that, with nine women pregnant, you can get
    > a baby in a month."
    > -- Wernher von
    Braun

    Damn, really? Guess ill stick to being fat ;-)

    shouldnt the advise be - eat more sensibly rather than eat less?
     
  8. Lee

    Lee Guest

    "elyob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > So, what type of cyclist are you? Do you stay in your seat or do you get
    up
    > and stomp on the pedals?
    >
    im a saddle guy im afraid, VERY rarely stand (unless i have a sore arse and need some air to
    cool me down)

    :)
     
  9. Dene Wilby

    Dene Wilby Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected]com says...
    >
    > "Bob" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Lee muttered:
    > >
    > > [snipped...]
    > >
    > > > Im desperately trying to lose weight too - i sweat like a pee eye gee.
    > > >
    > > > I havent lost any weight at the moment and its frustrating!
    > >
    > > Try eating less... ;-)
    > >
    > > --
    > > bob [at] bobarnott [dot] com
    > http://www.bobarnott.com/
    > > --------------------------------------------------------------------------
    > --
    > > "Crash programs fail because they are based on theory that, with nine women pregnant, you can
    > > get a baby in a month."
    > > -- Wernher von
    > Braun
    >
    >
    > Damn, really? Guess ill stick to being fat ;-)
    >
    > shouldnt the advise be - eat more sensibly rather than eat less?

    The trick is to eat cereal/toast for brekkie. Go out and do LOTS of miles on the bike. Have
    something simple for lunch (sandwich etc.) and then a good dinner when you get home (white fish,
    white meat) lots of veggies. And TOTALLY cut out out sweets (choccy, crisps etc.). I lost 2 stone in
    3 months doing this (but I WAS overweight). It really works but then everyone is different.

    Dene
     
  10. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Lee muttered:

    [snipped...]

    > Damn, really? Guess ill stick to being fat ;-)
    >
    > shouldnt the advise be - eat more sensibly rather than eat less?

    Depends, if you want to keep on eating chips and chocolate or not... If you do then just eat less,
    othewise instantlly convert to a raw vegan diet and become a hippy...

    --
    bob [at] bobarnott [dot] com http://www.bobarnott.com/
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    "Crash programs fail because they are based on theory that, with nine women pregnant, you can get a
    baby in a month."
    -- Wernher von Braun
     
  11. Lee

    Lee Guest

    "Bob" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    Snip!

    > become a hippy...
    >
    > --
    > bob [at] bobarnott [dot] com
    http://www.bobarnott.com/
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------
    --
    > "Crash programs fail because they are based on theory that, with nine women pregnant, you can get
    > a baby in a month."
    > -- Wernher von
    Braun
    >

    Yeah man... cool
     
  12. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "Lee" <[email protected]com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Im desperately trying to lose weight too - i sweat like a pee eye gee.
    >
    > I havent lost any weight at the moment and its frustrating!

    If you are cycling regularly you will be burning more calories -- the trouble is your body is
    probably demanding a few more to compensate.

    The good news is that improved fitness does not depend on shedding every last pound of fat -- and,
    yes, muscle is heavier -- so you can lose inches without losing much weight.

    Keep cycling and eat sensibly and, slowly, you will shed the weight. Its a long term project though
    -- not a six week crash course.

    T
     
  13. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    "elyob" <[email protected]> writes:

    > So, what type of cyclist are you? Do you stay in your seat or do you get up and stomp on
    > the pedals?
    >
    > The reason I ask, is that I'm desperately trying to beat 50 minutes for my 12 1/4 mile on/off road
    > route. I managed 51m11s yesterday, having dropped from 1h07m when I started a little while back.
    > There's a couple of hills where I normally stay seated, but I'm trying getting out of the seat,
    > but am finding it's a different muscle group and the switch back to seated needs to be timed well.

    I get out of my saddle when I need a bit of extra oomph and when the surface is 'bad' - where the
    value of 'bad' varies between my road bike and my hill bikes, of course. It gives you some extra
    power but also seems to build lactic acid in your legs - or at least in my legs
    - much quicker.

    > The one thing that really does speed me up, is seeing someone ahead of me, and trying to catch
    > them up and beat them. It took me 2 miles to catch this bike yesterday, but it was on the hill
    > that I made most of my catch up. I also recovered quicker at the top, and took off past him. I'm
    > just too competetive ;)

    This is a well known effect and is much studied by psychologists. The speed of two cyclists together
    is, allegedly, other things being equal, faster than that of the same two cyclists separate, and
    three cyclists together faster still up to a maximum of (about) eight, after which the speed starts
    to drop slightly with increasing numbers. I've read a very portentous paper somewhere a long time
    ago which tried to argue that this proved that the 'natural' size of human hunting groups was eight
    people, based primarily on this evidence.

    So the real way to break your record may be to get seven friends to go with you. Of course if you
    can assemble a pelleton around you you will potentially have some real measurable aerodynamic assist
    as well as the psychological effects of competition.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    'Victories are not solutions.' ;; John Hume, Northern Irish politician, on Radio Scotland
    1/2/95 ;; Nobel Peace Prize laureate 1998; few have deserved it so much
     
  14. Lee

    Lee Guest

    "Tony W" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Lee"
    <[email protected]com>
    > wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > Im desperately trying to lose weight too - i sweat like a pee eye gee.
    > >
    > > I havent lost any weight at the moment and its frustrating!
    >
    >
    > If you are cycling regularly you will be burning more calories -- the trouble is your body is
    > probably demanding a few more to compensate.
    >
    > The good news is that improved fitness does not depend on shedding every last pound of fat -- and,
    > yes, muscle is heavier -- so you can lose inches without losing much weight.
    >
    > Keep cycling and eat sensibly and, slowly, you will shed the weight. Its
    a
    > long term project though -- not a six week crash course.
    >
    > T
    >
    >

    True, I think I am expecting too much too soon.

    Does the sweating cease after a bit? ive noticed that I sweat less on a warm day when i walk to the
    shops & back.
     
  15. Elyob

    Elyob Guest

    "Tony W" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Lee"
    <[email protected]com>
    > wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > Im desperately trying to lose weight too - i sweat like a pee eye gee.
    > >
    > > I havent lost any weight at the moment and its frustrating!
    >
    >
    > If you are cycling regularly you will be burning more calories -- the trouble is your body is
    > probably demanding a few more to compensate.
    >
    > The good news is that improved fitness does not depend on shedding every last pound of fat -- and,
    > yes, muscle is heavier -- so you can lose inches without losing much weight.
    >
    > Keep cycling and eat sensibly and, slowly, you will shed the weight. Its
    a
    > long term project though -- not a six week crash course.
    >

    Yup, I've noticed, and so have others, that I'm looking leaner, and I'm down to last hole on my
    belt.. My weight hasn't changed though, so muscle is the only answer at the moment. I don't have a
    huge appetite, and if anything, hasn't changed since doing an hour a day (well, 51m 11s ).
     
  16. Elyob

    Elyob Guest

    "Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "elyob" <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    >
    > > The one thing that really does speed me up, is seeing someone ahead of
    me,
    > > and trying to catch them up and beat them. It took me 2 miles to catch
    this
    > > bike yesterday, but it was on the hill that I made most of my catch up.
    I
    > > also recovered quicker at the top, and took off past him. I'm just too competetive ;)
    >
    > This is a well known effect and is much studied by psychologists. The speed of two cyclists
    > together is, allegedly, other things being equal, faster than that of the same two cyclists
    > separate, and three cyclists together faster still up to a maximum of (about) eight, after which
    > the speed starts to drop slightly with increasing numbers. I've read a very portentous paper
    > somewhere a long time ago which tried to argue that this proved that the 'natural' size of human
    > hunting groups was eight people, based primarily on this evidence.
    >
    > So the real way to break your record may be to get seven friends to go with you. Of course if you
    > can assemble a pelleton around you you will potentially have some real measurable aerodynamic
    > assist as well as the psychological effects of competition.
    >

    I'm thinking of doing a mile around the block to warm up first. I'm now measuring my time by average
    speed. Trying to keep this up gives me a more reasonable idea of how I'm doing. The bit that
    surprised me yesterday was it was quite blustery. I guess I got some good tail wind, and I put more
    effort into chasing the other bike. I'm going out today to give it my all. :)
     
  17. Elyob

    Elyob Guest

    "Lee" <[email protected]com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >

    >
    > True, I think I am expecting too much too soon.
    >
    > Does the sweating cease after a bit? ive noticed that I sweat less on a
    warm
    > day when i walk to the shops & back.
    >

    I pretty much always break into a sweat once I stop. It's only on a decent cycle that I break into a
    sweat whilst moving. I've been measuring my heart rate, and within 100-200m or so it's aleady up to
    140, then settles at about 150-160. Maximum being around 190 ... The only answer is to slow down to
    keep the body cool. You'll need to coast at the end, to help bring down your body temperature for
    the dismount. Although, I am guessing, I never ride slow. :)
     
  18. Graham

    Graham Guest

    "Lee" <[email protected]com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Bob" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Lee muttered:
    > >
    > > [snipped...]
    > >
    > > > Im desperately trying to lose weight too - i sweat like a pee eye gee.
    > > >
    > > > I havent lost any weight at the moment and its frustrating!
    > >
    > > Try eating less... ;-)
    > >
    > > --
    > > bob [at] bobarnott [dot] com
    > http://www.bobarnott.com/
    >
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------
    > --
    > > "Crash programs fail because they are based on theory that, with nine women pregnant, you can
    > > get a baby in a month."
    > > -- Wernher von
    > Braun
    >
    >
    > Damn, really? Guess ill stick to being fat ;-)
    >
    > shouldnt the advise be - eat more sensibly rather than eat less?
    >
    > No, eat less do a lot of mileage and pedal like you mean it !

    Graham
     
  19. Scrumpy Joe

    Scrumpy Joe Guest

    elyob wrote:

    > So, what type of cyclist are you? Do you stay in your seat or do you get up and stomp on
    > the pedals?
    >
    > The reason I ask, is that I'm desperately trying to beat 50 minutes for my 12 1/4 mile on/off road
    > route. I managed 51m11s yesterday, having dropped from 1h07m when I started a little while back.
    > There's a couple of hills where I normally stay seated, but I'm trying getting out of the seat,
    > but am finding it's a different muscle group and the switch back to seated needs to be timed well.
    >
    > The one thing that really does speed me up, is seeing someone ahead of me, and trying to catch
    > them up and beat them. It took me 2 miles to catch this bike yesterday, but it was on the hill
    > that I made most of my catch up. I also recovered quicker at the top, and took off past him. I'm
    > just too competetive ;)
    >
    > Hey, hey, hey, looks like I'm getting fit again :) Now to lose some weight. I sweat like a horse
    > during my cycle, but don't see to lose any weight whatsoever .. :( I presume this is because
    > muscle is heavier than fat?
    >
    > Nick

    For climbing off road I tend to stay in the saddle. Your position when climbing off road is a fine
    balance between getting your weight far enough forward to stop the front wheel coming up yet far
    enough back to stop the rear wheel spinning on a loose surface.

    Getting out of the saddle to climb off road is a recipe for disaster.
     
  20. Scrumpy Joe wrote:

    > For climbing off road I tend to stay in the saddle. Your position when climbing off road is a fine
    > balance between getting your weight far enough forward to stop the front wheel coming up yet far
    > enough back to stop the rear wheel spinning on a loose surface.
    >
    > Getting out of the saddle to climb off road is a recipe for disaster.

    Oh how I feel that pain on off road climbs. Being a lardy arse and not very fit, uphill is where I
    struggle most and it makes me very jealous when people sail past me like it's a flat.

    Also being a lrdy arse makes the centre of gravity thing much harder, seemingly, than skinny folks -
    I'm always switching bewtween fron wheel lifts and rear wheel spins.

    --
    dnc
     
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