Clincher or Tubular??

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Ted B, Oct 11, 2003.

  1. Ted B

    Ted B New Member

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    Which do you prefer and why?
     
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  2. EastCoast

    EastCoast New Member

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    Clinchers
    - Most people still carry a spare
    tube and do their repairs when they get home.

    - are cheaper to run: if you puncture a lot clinchers will probably
    still save you money over tubulars, even if you repair your
    tubulars whenever possible. Tubulars are only repairable most
    of the time, you virtually never write off a clincher casing due
    to a puncture.

    - have improved immensely in recent years; top models now inflate
    to high pressures, and are lighter and stronger than they used
    to be. Likewise clincher rims. Some debate over whether
    tubulars are still lighter and tubular rims stronger. Probably
    depends on quality you select. No doubt that high quality
    clinchers/rims stronger, lighter and more dependable than cheap
    tubular/rim combination.
     
  3. ddallam

    ddallam New Member

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    Clinchers beat cheap tubulars, but good tubulars always beat clinchers. Tubular rim design is inherently stronger and lighter: a triangle is stronger than a "U", plain and simple, so for the same amount of metal they are stronger, and for the same strength they are lighter. Changing a tubular is faster than changing a clincher. The space that a spare tubular takes up is not all that much more. Repairing a tubular tire isn't hard after you do a few. My strategy is to buy good tubulars, repair flats and use them as spares. You're never going to get a pinch flat with a tubular rim, and you can always ride a flat tubular home. Try that with a clincher! And for the weightweenies who like to spend money, a top tubular rim/tire combination is still a lot lighter than any clincher I've tried. One of the probelms I always had with tubulars was that they lose air overnight. I ride Tufo S33's exclusively now, which will hold 120psi for several weeks. Cheap tubulars wear out fast and flat easily, good tubulars last forever and rarely flat. It's worth it to only buy the best. That's my 0.02.
     
  4. laryhead

    laryhead New Member

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    I didn't see any mention of the gluing required in putting tubulars on. Maybe has improved with time, but I don't miss that hassle since going to clinchers. Also, I know some folks that haven't done a good job of gluing the tubular on and had it roll off in a sharp downhill curve. OUCH! For my money, the clincher is much more hassle free, but the purist seem to prefer tubulars. To each his own.
     
  5. JohnO

    JohnO New Member

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    If you're a casual rider, clinchers. Tubulars are not worth the hassle.

    On the other hand, if you're competing, or if you want to live the true traditional cycling experience, get a second set of wheels, and make them tubular. Gluing the tires on the rim - not really a problem if you do it right. Repairing a flat - a rite of passage. You're not a true cyclist until you've repaired a tubular flat. Definitely easier to change a flat on the road.

    I still remember, when I first started cycling, seeing a set of silk tubulars. Absolutely beautiful, with their silver sidewalls. Pity they don't seem to make those anymore. I would have bought a set, but they were $80 each - 25 years ago.
     
  6. tryintobreakasp

    tryintobreakasp New Member

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    tubos definitely. stronger, lighter, rarely flat(pick the glass out at the end of a ride with a razor blade), never need truing, and oh yeah the FEEL!! If your like me you appreciate being able to lay the bike down in the corners and still feel like you're upright. As for the contact cement; pre-stretch your tire on a rim and apply a generous amount of glue to the tire with a tooth brush. the bristles help get the cement down into the cotton fibers, let it dry and slap it onto a pre-glued rim. If the cement still bothers you your a wuss. It is totally worth the minimal trouble they require.
     
  7. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    Why mess with tubulars except for serious racing?
     
  8. blip

    blip New Member

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    Clinchers on the training wheels / bike.
    Tubulars on the race bike.

    Easy repair job on the clinchers while training and you get that gorgeous attack hard and blow them off your wheel speed of tubulars when it counts...........racing.
     
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