Clincher Tires Vs Tubulars

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by lectraplayer, Jun 16, 2015.

  1. lectraplayer

    lectraplayer Member

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    I noticed the other day that they now have tubulars for mountain biking. I have known about road tubulars, though. Why would I want a tubular over a clincher? ...or more specifically, what are the advantages and disadvantages of both types of wheels?
     
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  2. kylerlittle

    kylerlittle Member

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    I think that Tubulars are great in that case.
     
  3. ABNPFDR

    ABNPFDR Member

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    Unless you're doing short World Cup XC racing (like a cross race but on a mountain bike course) then you probably should avoid tubular MTB tires.

    For most of us, Running tubeless is the way to go.
     
  4. lectraplayer

    lectraplayer Member

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    Are tubulars maypops or are they just costly and a challenge to "work on?"
     
  5. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    MTB tubulars are the ultimate if you like to run low pressures. Cornering on tubeless setups can cause the tire to "burp" and lose all pressure.
     
  6. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    MTB tubulars are the ultimate if you like to run low pressures. Cornering on tubeless setups can cause the tire to "burp" and lose all pressure.
     
  7. ABNPFDR

    ABNPFDR Member

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    And tubulars can roll right off the rim, even when glued correctly.

    All tire systems have their strengths and weaknesses, and all have their place. All things considered, When you factor in the likelihood of flats, the pressure you can run, the availability of tires, cost, ease of maintenance... For the average rider, tubeless is the way to go. You can run lower pressure, have excellent flat protection, most tires these days are compatible with tubeless so you have a wide selection for the terrain you run, and yes, while you can burp a tire, it's not likely if you keep the fluid topped off and run pressures that are not so low that you're bottoming out the rims.
     
  8. lectraplayer

    lectraplayer Member

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    I knew it looked like street tubulars would roll sideways off the rim the first good curve I took. I would hate to see that happen.
     
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