Clinchers or Tubulars

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by firegooroo, Mar 16, 2004.

  1. firegooroo

    firegooroo New Member

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    I have done a search and can't seem to find a common ground for this question.

    I have read that the UCI have been trying to ban the tubulars from the racing circuit, stating that they are to dangerous. I have also read that tubulars are making a great come back and that 80% or better of the pros in the circuit today are using tubulars.

    I have only used clinchers and have never used a tubular before tomorrow shall be the first time I use them on the new wheels I got. But I pose this questions to everyone.

    What would you rather use tubulars or clinchers? and why or why not. If you have a positive response give an explanation as to why the positive response and vise versa for negative.
     
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  2. Rompinrhino

    Rompinrhino New Member

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    I use the clinchers the vast majority of the time. I find it way easier if I get a flat to just whip out the patchkit and fix it. Plus, I dont have to carry arround an extra tire.

    Ocasionally I will pull out the old tubulars and give them a spin. I like how they feel on the road, nice and smooth, it puts a smile on my face every time.:)

    But once again the reason I don't use them all the time is because of the spare tire issue.

    But, I'm thinking about trying these new clinchers that ride like tubulars, if anyone has any input on those. :cool:
     
  3. firegooroo

    firegooroo New Member

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    I've been using clinchers so far all of the time. On my training rides I have a set of Continentals and for race day I have a set of Michelen pro racers with bontrager super lite tubes only 65g. But I'm trying to use the tubulars now on race day and see how they feel.
     
  4. tafi

    tafi Member

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    I have always used clinchers cos they're easy to fix and roll pretty well. If you like higher pressures than there are tyres which will take it. In sydney the roads are such that high pressure (above 120-140psi) is useless anyway.
    If I rode track on the other hand.....
     
  5. BeeGuy

    BeeGuy New Member

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    I raced on sewups back in the early 80's when most racers did and was frustrated with the whole flat thing. I was a mechanic for 12 years but I don't think I ever successfully fixed a flat tubular. Maybe it's easier now, but the thought of dropping 50 bucks on a flat makes me cringe. Now I ride Conti 3000's and they sing just like my tubies used too. Good enough for me.

    chris
    ne iowa
     
  6. EoinC

    EoinC New Member

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    I also raced on tubs back in the 80's. Being a cheap-arse, I used to fix my flats. What else is there to do when you don't have TV? I had a rule that I only used the repaired sew-ups for training. That rule lasted about as long as it took me to think of it (largely due to only ever having one pair of tubs at a time.
    They are a bit fiddly to fix, but you feel ever-so artistic when you stitch the buggers back together - sort of like a cross between a surgeon saving lives and an old biddy crocheting teapot cozy's.
    I can think of better things to do - but not many. I guess that means I'm older and wiser now?!?

    Eoin
     
  7. EoinC

    EoinC New Member

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    I find this a little strange. The weight of a rolled-up tub strapped under the seat (that's what toe straps were invented for) is probably the same as your repair kit. As for the time involved, that is one of the great features of sew-ups (or tubs) - roll the punctured one off, roll the replacement on, pump it up and you're gone while clincherman is still pulling the tube out. If it is taking you longer to fit a tub than it does to repair a tube and re-fit it, you are either a puncture repairing marvel, or there is something wrong with the picture.

    Eoin (tubs) C
     
  8. mjw_byrne

    mjw_byrne New Member

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    What about "tubular clinchers", e.g. the ones offered by Tufo? I've read that these are basically tubulars with a couple of ridges in the casing to allow them to be used on clincher wheels. Sounds good to me - all the performance benefits of tubulars but a wider choice of wheels, less possibility of rolling a tyre off and no messing around with glue. Although of course, they are still tricky to repair.
     
  9. pbook

    pbook New Member

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    Tufos are pricy but I would love to try them. A guy on my team said that one of his felt a bit out of round? Not exactly sure what he meant. They do take remarkably high pressure ~220 psi or something like that.

    Used sewups in the day. As a matter of fact that's what got me into the sport. Borrowed a friends dads bike, a Windsor Pro, and flatted. I was 16 or 17 (we start late in the states). I couldn't figure out how to fix it. Frustrated I finally took it into a shop. They explained it to me. In the meantime I had grown to love the way that bike looked and finally talked the guy into selling it to me.

    I did continue riding sewups for several years repairing many flats. I rolled one or two also. That's the down side. If money was not an object and someone else mounted them I would switch back to sew ups...
     
  10. ccdriver

    ccdriver New Member

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    I used to always use tubulars in the 70s, 80s, until the mid 90s. This is my opinion, tubular wheels are stronger and tubular tires ride much better than clinchers. But the problem with tubulars is that you have to use real good ones or they are junk. Like Victoria CG or CXs were the hot thing in my day. Now I just ride clinchers. A lot less money and I would say they roll just as good as tubes but do not ride as good. As far as fixing tubulars, we used to just throw them away if we punctured them.
     
  11. soneca2

    soneca2 New Member

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    I always rode tubulars and due to the smooth riding and light weight, even having never rode a race, never changed to clinchers.

    My biggest concern, was always flats until I discovered about 2 years ago the Tufo tubulars.

    These are really awesome in the worst conditions, pricy and have an extremely long life. But still worried about flats and knowing, that being tubeless they cannot be repaired like the traditional sewups I watched out for repair alternatives.

    Tufo offers under other products a sealant and here I would like to ask, if anybody has already tried out this sealant and what results he got.

    Thank you for your help and best regards
     
  12. EoinC

    EoinC New Member

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    How long are you getting out of a set of Tufo's? Which ones are you using? I was going to get a set when I was down in Australia, but for some reason I didn't.
    If you are getting a decent life out of them for the cost, then it doesn't matter if you can't repair them.
    Do you notice any difference in them over riding with tubs or clinchers?

    Eoin C
     
  13. soneca2

    soneca2 New Member

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    Hi!

    I have been using the cheaper ones, S33 Pro and S33 Special, which cost around US$ 35 each. Both have been giving me easily 3500 to 4000 kms on the back wheel in the worst rode conditions you could imagine (Brazil).

    I have no experience on clinchers, but I can compare them with the Continentals (mainly Sprint), Gommitalias and Vittorias.

    The other brands ride smoother, but also have a "softer" rubber, and I had lots of flats.

    The Tufos seem to have a much "harder" rubber and roll a bit harder at 110 to 120 psi, but up to date I only had one flat.

    I would say, that they are the best brand I have used in my 30 year biking life.
     
  14. EoinC

    EoinC New Member

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    Thanks. Good information.

    Regards,
    Eoin C
     
  15. Rompinrhino

    Rompinrhino New Member

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    Yea, thinking about it, I guess your right. Maybee I'm a puncture repairing marvel. :p
     
  16. xcspace

    xcspace New Member

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    The cheapest Tufo tubulars are S22's which can be found for $25-30 and are good training tires at 260g. I generally get 2000 to 2500 miles on the rear and double on the front. They are less puncture prone than the clinchers I've tried. But since they can't be repaired, a serious puncture is more expensive than patching a clincher tube. Now I train on clinchers (getting 2-3 puntures a week here in Tucson) and race on Tufo S3 tubulars (which I can often find on eBay for $25) which are generally lighter than clinchers. Glory Cycles often has great prices on Tufo tubulars and Tufo clinchers (tubulars with the ridge for a clincher rim); neither can be repaired.

    I've been using tubulars since the early 70's and only just started using clinchers this year since they came on some bikes I purchased. Never had a problem with tubulars, so I can't see why they would be classified as too dangerous. As with any tires, they must be properly mounted and have adequate pressure.

    The sealant works for small punctures if you don't pump the tires past about 115 psi. The S22's only have a max of 130 and the sealant can be forced out the puncture at 130. Other Tufo's that can take 220 psi wouldn't benefit from the sealant if you want decent pressure for racing.

    Also, if you go with the Tufo tape, you can't just slap on another tire after a flat and ride away, you also have to lay on another strip of tape (which usually takes the most time, since it usually gets squished while riding and is then difficult to unroll).

    I have found Tufo tires to last longer than other tubulars, are generally cheaper to boot, and are extremely round due to their constuction (no sewing, just seamless like a thick tube with tread).
     
  17. pease

    pease New Member

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    The tubular/clinchers from Tufo are great. I only have 400 miles or so, but the ride is wonderful, they are easy to pop on and off (I've read a lot of people complain they are difficult, but I don't think they stretched the tire beforehand). I have the sealant in them, but to my knowledge the sealant hasn't been tested yet. The Tufos are nice, not silky like an old Vittoria CX and CG combo, but better than any clincher I've ridden.





     
  18. tafi

    tafi Member

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    If I were to use tubulars on a pair of race wheels then I would seriously consider getting a pair of tubular training wheels too. I know that you can repair many tubulars (if you have patience).
    Wouldn't it then be feaseable to use the repaied ones for road training? I have been told they're not as puncture prone as many clinchers.
     
  19. EoinC

    EoinC New Member

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    I used to repair my tubs and use them for training (and racing if they weren't too bad). Back when I was riding, Vittoria CG's and CX's were the standard. Usually they would wear out before puncturing, but ocassilonally I'd pick up a glass shard or something. Repairing them is not difficult, it just takes time and patience.

    Eoin C
     
  20. tafi

    tafi Member

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    So am I to take it that from a puncture point of view you can get less punctures with a good tubular tyre compared to a clincher and potentialy have an easier repair to make if you do flat on a training ride (just roll off and roll on and away you go again)?

    I tend to look at this (like any other problem) economicaly. I think the best way is to either run tubulars or clinchers on everything, that way if you have to repair one, then it can be used for training on or as a spare.

    The problem if you use tubulars only for racing would be that you would get punctured unusable tubulars piling up and still have to buy spares and tubes for your training wheels. You see I like to run pretty high pressures during a race (hence a tubular is obviusly better) but if I were to puncture (and then repair) one then I would prefer not to use it at 200psi because a patch and glue is only so strong.
     
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