Clinchers or Tubulars

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by firegooroo, Mar 16, 2004.

  1. Daremo

    Daremo New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2003
    Messages:
    317
    Likes Received:
    0
    I always ran Conti. Grand Prix clincher in 18's or 20's, both of which could be pumped to 150 psi comfortably per their recommendations. Fast, light, very good tires. Put thousands of miles on them with few flats, and they raced great.

    I don't get where people say that tubulars are lighter .............. a really good clincher and lightweight tube set-up weigh basically the same as a really nice set of tubulars, which cost three times more.

    Stronger?? How so, it is the same rim material and technology? I guess you could argue that tubular rims are a solid shape which could provide a more rigid structure. But a good welded seam clincher rim lasts just as long. I've seen dinged rims from both camps over the 5 years I was a mechanic for shops, it totally depends on the rider's style and ability to keep them from getting housed.

    MY best example of why people should run clinchers would be Beloki in last year's Tour .......... we all know what happened to him! Who needs a tire to un-glue and roll at 45 mph on a hot day on a descent ..........

    Just my opinion though, doesn't amount to much.
     


  2. Ted B

    Ted B New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2003
    Messages:
    625
    Likes Received:
    0

    The pros don't like losing time or GC placings due to pinch flats, which is why the pros race tubulars.
     
  3. dennis dee

    dennis dee New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2004
    Messages:
    210
    Likes Received:
    0
    I've been using clinchers since they're more practical. But having said that, I haven't come accross a clincher that matches the ride of my campy/wolber tubular wheelset. So for special occassions I ride the tubulars.

    Changing topic, I am really intrigued by the new Michelin TUBELESS clinchers that fit my Mavic Ksyrium SSC SLs. Anyone know where I can get a pair?
     
  4. dennis dee

    dennis dee New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2004
    Messages:
    210
    Likes Received:
    0
    Beloki's accident was due to tire blowout and not because of the tire ungluing from the rim.
     
  5. RSD

    RSD New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2004
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    I love my Tufo's :D. I mainly ride the HICC model, it's light, seems to wear well, and grips well in the rain. I always squirt a syringe full of Stan's No Flats into them and almost never get flats. Every once in awhile I'll hear the dreaded "popsssssssss...", but it always stops almost immediately. Also, I've mounted a lot of tubs in my time, and I've never had a Tufo that wasn't round and true (unlike a few other brands *cough* Vittoria *cough*).
     
  6. joule

    joule New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2004
    Messages:
    211
    Likes Received:
    0
    Well I tried repairing quite a few tubulars in my day. Certainly harder than repairing a clincher. Hardest part (for me anyway) is getting the stiching tension the same as the rest of the tire when sewing it back up. Too loose and the tire is slightly fatter causing a rythmic thumping. Too tight and the tire is slightly skinner causing that same annoying thump. Now I just ride clinchers for training and pull out the tubulars for races. Course if I do get a flat on a tubular, throw it away and get another.
     
  7. Bjarnephys

    Bjarnephys New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2003
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi
    How much of this Stan's No Flats are you using per tire?. Have you tried other tire sealant products apart from this?
     
  8. 53-11

    53-11 New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2005
    Messages:
    182
    Likes Received:
    0
    I haven't read this thread yet, but I like the Tufo Elite "Tubular clinchers" a lot.


    Some say they don't have the weight advantage of the True tubulars, but I will say that they don't have the glue problem of tubulars either (supposedly increase rolling resistance due to tire squirm on the rim....track glue fixes this supposedly).

    They also seem to me to be very safe in the event of a blow-out. I'd expect The Tufo clinchers to be more controllable at high speed than a regular clincher should they go flat (which is not 100% continous around the circumference). A flat Tufo clincher grips the rim much better than a flat regular clincher which is an open design.
     
  9. wilmar13

    wilmar13 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2003
    Messages:
    1,551
    Likes Received:
    0
    I think there is a thread somewhere on here about the ride of the tufo clinchers leaving something to be desired. I know it has been discussed ad nausem, but higher pressures create MORE rolling resistance because of the tires inability to absorb minor road surface variation. Also the tufo has less than ideal case suppleness supposedly (I have no experience with this). I do think the idea is rather innovative, even if its Pros/Cons end up with a net sum negative score.

    My experience with Tubulars is limited to Conti Sprinters and Tufo race-lites, but I don't feel much difference between them and a set of Vitoria Open Corsa's (clincher) with latex tubes. Now the difference between my tubulars and a set of Conti Grand Prix's or another middle range tire is very noticable. IMO there is probably more difference between two clinchers that vary in their construction and quality, than there is between a good tubular, and a good clincher.
     
  10. House

    House Banned

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2004
    Messages:
    850
    Likes Received:
    0
    Don't you have to glue a tub to the rim? WOuldn't that make changing a flat a rather long experience?
     
  11. wilmar13

    wilmar13 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2003
    Messages:
    1,551
    Likes Received:
    0
    No because you pre-glue the tire, and fold it so that the glue is against itself. When you flat, you roll one off, put the new one on, inflate and go.
     
  12. wilmar13

    wilmar13 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2003
    Messages:
    1,551
    Likes Received:
    0
    Of course this means that the TOTAL time you spend changing a flat is greater for a tubular (at least for those of us without mechanics), but the time spent out on the roadside repair is less.
     
  13. 53-11

    53-11 New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2005
    Messages:
    182
    Likes Received:
    0
    About the rolling resistance. I will agree with you that once you exceed the optimum pressure for a given load nothing is gained. I'm a little heavier than the average pro who weighs 150-160lbs. For those guys 110 psi might be perfect, but for me I like a little more psi in tire. (mainly the rear tire esp. during climbs)

    I never rode true high end tubulars ( I want to) so I can't compare them the Tufo clinchers, but my experience has been been very positive with them. Even at high Psi they don't ride harsh.

    I imagine that the really nice tubular stuff is ultra smooth.

    BTW, Have you ever used the Tufo Tape? (that's what I would want to use if I went the tubular route)

    What do you think about Jobst assertion that certain glues increase rolling resistance? http://www.sheldonbrown.com/brandt/rolling-resistance-tubular.html
     
  14. Mike_MTB

    Mike_MTB New Member

    Joined:
    May 2, 2005
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    I carry a can of fix-o-flat sealant. Compressed air with slime.... works PERFECT. I have used it twice for tubular flats. Not only did it get me home on that ride, they held pressure for 1wk+. The can costs less than $10 and keeps my $75 tire in service.
     
  15. ChangMan

    ChangMan New Member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    124
    Likes Received:
    0
    I ride clinchers.
     
  16. steve-d

    steve-d New Member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2005
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    I always use the Tubulars. Something about them. Good conversation starter too.

    BTW, always remove and discard the plastic valve cap. In the event of a "roll off" of the tire from the rim, you have a greater chance of the tire coming free of the rim and a better chance of avoiding a fall.

    Keeping the cap on the valve stem will result in zero chance of the valve stem slipping free thru the rim hole. The tire remains attached to the rim and causes the rotating wheel to stop instantly when it entangles with the fork or stays. Over you go.

    Steve
     
  17. Alpha

    Alpha New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2005
    Messages:
    116
    Likes Received:
    0
    Never rode tubes.
    I do not race, never have and never will (45 years old)
    This is the 3rd year I've had my pair of Michelin pro race. In the 4000 km on them so far, I've had one flat.:)
    Clichers all the way for me.
     
  18. Bear the Bear

    Bear the Bear New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2005
    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have been riding now for going on about 12 years. I started about the end of the period where you could still get fantastic tubulars ie italian clement, vittoria cxs,silk casings. I have always raced the high tubulars. Using cheapos is a waste of time they're not puncture resistant, lumpy and slow.
    These days I ride dugast tubulars(the last bastion of hand made tires) and veloflex(not quite as good).
    I use clinchers for training because puncture repair is easier and cheap, also in the last 3 years I have only puctured once in a race.

    Bear
     
Loading...
Loading...