Clinicians prescribing exercise: is air pollution a hazard?

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by kanangara, Feb 5, 2006.

  1. kanangara

    kanangara New Member

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    http://www.mja.com.au/public/issues/184_03_060206/letters_060206_fm-3.html

    Parbs
     
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  2. EuanB

    EuanB New Member

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    From memory this was hashed over about six months ago. It's pretty much as the report says: cycling for transport is a healthier option than driving and all road users are the victims of particulate matter which is much higher in Australia than in Europe.

    Lobby your MP for better contols on diesel particulate matter with a view to bringning them to EU levels. That's the best outcome for everyone.
     
  3. cfsmtb

    cfsmtb New Member

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    Yes this recently came up on the BFA list, and if I can be bothered digging it up, there probably was a a.b thread. Link to article below.

    Clinicians prescribing exercise: is air pollution a hazard?: James E Sharman
    http://www.mja.com.au/public/issues/182_12_200605/sha10929_fm.html

    Quote:
    In summary, there is sound evidence for an exposure-dependent relationship between air pollution, morbidity and mortality, particularly in relation to cardiovascular and respiratory illnesses. Although regular aerobic exercise is recommended for good health, there may be adverse health consequences for people who habitually exercise in areas of high ambient pollution. Despite this, it is not uncommon to see people running or cycling alongside congested roadways, and clinicians should advise patients to exercise on quiet roads or in parks and recreation areas. The best time of day to exercise is early in the morning, before the build-up of traffic and when it is cooler. This is relevant because the combination of sunlight and heat with certain compounds increases ozone production. Importantly, certain groups may be acutely susceptible to the effects of air pollution, and clinicians should advise them accordingly.

    ***

    Point taken, but isn't the main problem being avoided here? :confused:
     
  4. AndrewJ

    AndrewJ Guest

    Last time I saw this issue raised, there was another study that looked
    at the level of pollution inside the cars.

    The cars had more pollution inside them: presumably "scooping it up".

    Admittedly the people inside the cars are asleep and brain monitors
    show no activity, so I guess they are perfectly safe :)


    cfsmtb wrote:
    > EuanB Wrote:
    > > From memory this was hashed over about six months ago. It's pretty much
    > > as the report says: cycling for transport is a healthier option than
    > > driving and all road users are the victims of particulate matter which
    > > is much higher in Australia than in Europe.
    > >

    >
    > Yes this recently came up on the BFA list, and if I can be bothered
    > digging it up, there probably was a a.b thread. Link to article below.
    >
    > Clinicians prescribing exercise: is air pollution a hazard?: James E
    > Sharman
    > http://www.mja.com.au/public/issues/182_12_200605/sha10929_fm.html
    >
    > Quote:
    > In summary, there is sound evidence for an exposure-dependent
    > relationship between air pollution, morbidity and mortality,
    > particularly in relation to cardiovascular and respiratory illnesses.
    > Although regular aerobic exercise is recommended for good health, there
    > may be adverse health consequences for people who habitually exercise in
    > areas of high ambient pollution. Despite this, it is not uncommon to see
    > people running or cycling alongside congested roadways, and clinicians
    > should advise patients to exercise on quiet roads or in parks and
    > recreation areas. The best time of day to exercise is early in the
    > morning, before the build-up of traffic and when it is cooler. This is
    > relevant because the combination of sunlight and heat with certain
    > compounds increases ozone production. Importantly, certain groups may
    > be acutely susceptible to the effects of air pollution, and clinicians
    > should advise them accordingly.
    >
    > ***
    >
    > Point taken, but isn't the main problem being avoided here? :confused:
    >
    >
    > --
    > cfsmtb
     
  5. EuanB

    EuanB New Member

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    This is probably the study you're thinking of:

    http://www.icta.org/doc/In-car%20pollution%20report.pdf
     
  6. Bruce Graham

    Bruce Graham Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > Last time I saw this issue raised, there was another study that looked
    > at the level of pollution inside the cars.
    >
    > The cars had more pollution inside them: presumably "scooping it up".
    >
    >

    They measured pollution as a function of height. Cyclists were breathing
    above the worst of the pollution and the air at car intake level was a
    fair bit worse.
     
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