clipless pedal question

Discussion in 'The Bike Cafe' started by madmax7, Nov 17, 2007.

  1. madmax7

    madmax7 New Member

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    hey, this is my first post and this seems like a really cool forum
    but i was wondering, i have spina bifida and this caused my left foot to have a lot of problems and there is an extremely limited range of motion in it. i was thinking about getting some clipless pedals but i don't really know if i would be able to do the right movements needed to release my foot. is there any other way to release your foot other than twisting the ankle. or maybe i don't understand how cp's work at all. any help would be much appreciated, thanks
     
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  2. mikesbytes

    mikesbytes New Member

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    Why don't you try them out at the local bike shop.

    Alternative to clipless, is rattrap pedals and cleated shoes, you undo the strap and take the foot out backwards. Only for experienced riders.
     
  3. madmax7

    madmax7 New Member

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    alright thanks, will do. hopefully its more of a motion in the leg than in the ankle
     
  4. Jonahhobbes

    Jonahhobbes New Member

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    You can loosen clipless pedals up a bit, so you actually don't need an awful lot of strength or twisting to get out of them. I'd suggest VP MTB clipless pedals; they have a wide area that look more like a normal pedal and I would imagine they would be much easier to get in and out of compared to the "egg-beater" type pedals that most people associate with clipless.

    I have a set of VP-X82 on my commute bike and have never had any trouble with them apart from them being heavy, they have the advantage of being able to be ridden with normal shoes too at a pinch.

    Here's a link: http://www.vpcomponents.com/pedals.asp?pcat2=2

    I'll give it a go just trying to get out of them using knee motion only. Is this the sort of range of motion you have?
     
  5. mikeg

    mikeg New Member

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    You might try the Shimano Multi-directional release SPD cleats


    http://www.deanwoods.com.au/store/prod1989.htm

    for use on SPD pedals and MTB/Touring shoes.

    Alternatively Crank Bros pedals might also be a solution.

    Ask at your LBS

    Mike
     
  6. madmax7

    madmax7 New Member

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    thank you for all the suggestions. i'm thinking about going by the lbs tomorrow to try some out.

    i can twist my leg pretty well though. another concern i have is that my feet point outward and its hard to keep them straight, should this be a big problem?
     
  7. mikeg

    mikeg New Member

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    If you feet point outward with normal straight operation of knee, then you should maintain as best as you can the same angle of you feet on the pedals,
    otherwise you will get knee problems such as ITB.

    See http://www.cptips.com/footsyn.htm

    and knee pain section http://www.cptips.com/knee.htm

    Mike
     
  8. Jonahhobbes

    Jonahhobbes New Member

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    Did you get to try out the clipless pedals Madmax?
     
  9. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    FWIW. Despite the limited range of motion in your left foot, if you are able to unclip your right foot [this requires moving the REAR of the cleat about 30+ (?) degrees to disegage it from the binding which is executed by moving your heel outward-or-inward by an appropriate amount] AND depending on your pedaling style, you can actually use almost any LOOK/-type/-derivative pedal ... BUT, for on left shoe, you will want to mount a SHIMANO/-type SPD-compatible cleat (which is smaller than the pedal BINDING'S "opening") ...

    Essentially, the cleat on the left foot will only/(simply) keep your foot/shoe in the pedal as long as you are pushing down/forward, but when you want to release your left foot, removal simply means backing your foot off the pedal.

    Depending on your pedaling style, you could use an SPD cleat on both shoes if you wanted ...
     
  10. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    I think that a problem you may encounter (if you haven't already) is that you may find that the heel of your shoe(s) MAY rub against the crankarm(s) ... I've seen crankarms where people have worn grooves into the arms as a consequence of the repeated heel-to-crank contact.
     
  11. madmax7

    madmax7 New Member

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    well i tried them out and they don't seem to be too much of a problem. i'm gonna start saving up for some right away, thanks for all your help :)

    alfeng, YES. except that instead of a groove in the crank arm it's a sore on the inside of my heel. its a nasty problem and there has been a scab there for almost a year since i constantly keep reopening it. i heard something about these guards that you can put on your feet to prevent this from happening but i can't find any.
     
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