Clipless pedals and Transitions

Discussion in 'Triathlon' started by David Matusow, Jul 10, 2003.

  1. Hi,

    I have recently switched to clipless pedals, and have the following question. I know that the top
    racers keep their cycling shoes clipped in, and just jump on the bike at T1, and then attach them
    while riding. Likewise, they detach them before dismounting at T2.

    I do not think that I will be able to get comfortable with this anytime soon. So, my question is,
    what does everyone else do? I have only done a few triathlons in the past, but some of them had a
    fairly long distance from the transition area to when you were allowed to mount the bike. If that is
    the case, do people just put on their shoes and run/walk in them until they can mount? Or, do they
    run barefoot or in socks until the mounting area, and then put on the shoes? I have Look brand
    clips, and it is very uncomfortable to walk in them, let alone run. But, it seems like it might not
    be a good idea to stop at the mount area to put on shoes. All advice is appreciated!

    Thanks, --David

    --
    David Matusow NASA / GSFC Email -> [email protected]
     
    Tags:


  2. David,

    From the past triathlons I've raced in, most people either have their shoes already clipped in prior
    to mounting the bike and then put there feet in once up to speed, or change into their shoes in
    transition and run with shoes on to the mount line. Personally, I've found it a royal pain trying to
    get wet feet into the shoes if they're already clipped into the pedals. I've tried it a few times in
    the past with varied success, sometimes it works great, others I've had to stop, get off the bike
    completely and take the shoes off the pedals and put them on. If your really concerned with time
    then I'd practice putting the shoes on once on the bike before the actual race (its not impossible),
    but if you don't want to chance it, I'd suggest putting on the shoes in transition and running the
    bike out (it'll proably take 10-15 seconds longer). You can run in the shoes even with the
    odd-shaped clip on the bottom, just carefully. Hope this helps.

    Cheers, Kevin

    "David Matusow" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I have recently switched to clipless pedals, and have the following question. I know that the top
    > racers keep their cycling shoes clipped in, and just jump on the bike at T1, and then attach them
    > while riding. Likewise, they detach them before dismounting at T2.
    >
    > I do not think that I will be able to get comfortable with this anytime soon. So, my question is,
    > what does everyone else do? I have only done a few triathlons in the past, but some of them had a
    > fairly long distance from the transition area to when you were allowed to mount the bike. If that
    > is the case, do people just put on their shoes and run/walk in them until they can mount? Or, do
    > they run barefoot or in socks until the mounting area, and then put on the shoes? I have Look
    > brand clips, and it is very uncomfortable to walk in them, let alone run. But, it seems like it
    > might not be a good idea to stop at the mount area to put on shoes. All advice is appreciated!
    >
    > Thanks, --David
    >
    > --
    > David Matusow NASA / GSFC Email -> [email protected]
     
  3. cvcabran

    cvcabran New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2003
    Messages:
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    0
    A follow up question: I'm new to the sport and will be running my first duathlon in September. Can I get away without using clipless pedals (i.e. running shoes secured to the pedals with toe clips), or is this a total newbie mistake?
     
  4. Harold Buck

    Harold Buck Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "Kevin Garnier"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > From the past triathlons I've raced in, most people either have their shoes already clipped in
    > prior to mounting the bike and then put there feet in once up to speed, or change into their shoes
    > in transition and run with shoes on to the mount line. Personally, I've found it a royal pain
    > trying to get wet feet into the shoes if they're already clipped into the pedals. I've tried it a
    > few times in the past with varied success, sometimes it works great, others I've had to stop, get
    > off the bike completely and take the shoes off the pedals and put them on. If your really
    > concerned with time then I'd practice putting the shoes on once on the bike before the actual race
    > (its not impossible),

    Do NOT do this until you're really comfortable with it. You could easily cause a crash that ends
    someone else's day. Taking the shoes *OFF* while on the bike is much easier. Oh, and even if you ARE
    good at it, don't do it if there's a climb right out of the transition area like at the Wisconsin
    Dells Tinman (I guess unless you're really, really good!).

    > but if you don't want to chance it, I'd suggest putting on the shoes in transition and running the
    > bike out (it'll proably take 10-15 seconds longer). You can run in the shoes even with the
    > odd-shaped clip on the bottom, just carefully. Hope this helps.

    Running with cycling shoes is annoying, but you can use your bike to balance yourself. This
    helps a lot.

    --Harold Buck

    "I used to rock and roll all night, and party every day. Then it was every other day. . . ."

    - Homer J. Simpson
     
  5. John Hardt

    John Hardt Guest

    On 7/10/03 3:57 PM, in article, "John Hardt" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > David,
    >
    > Most people I know (who aren't competing for a win) simply put their shoes on in transition and
    > walk/run/jog their bike to the mount line. I agree with Harold Buck's comment - don't try the
    > alternative in a race until you're REALLY comfortable with it.
    >
    > I feel your pain on the part about the shoes being uncomfortable to walk in. My first pair of
    > shoes/clipless pedals were Carnac shoes with speedplay pedals. The Speedplay cleat was HUGE and I
    > had several close calls with serious ankle injuries.
    >
    > Ultimately I solved the problem by switching to mountain bike shoes. The MTB shoes have rubber
    > "bumps" (normally called cleats, but I'm trying to avoid confusion here) on the bottom of the shoe
    > that "hide" the metal cleat and don't allow it to touch the ground. I can run in these shoes with
    > no problem and the they've worked great for about 6 races.

    Note: I should have also noted that I dumped the speedplay pedals in favor of SPD's with smaller
    cleats. Yes, there are other considerations in choosing a pedal (float etc.) but the SPD's
    work for me.

    -John
     
  6. John Hardt

    John Hardt Guest

    David,

    Most people I know (who aren't competing for a win) simply put their shoes on in transition and
    walk/run/jog their bike to the mount line. I agree with Harold Buck's comment - don't try the
    alternative in a race until you're REALLY comfortable with it.

    I feel your pain on the part about the shoes being uncomfortable to walk in. My first pair of
    shoes/clipless pedals were Carnac shoes with speedplay pedals. The Speedplay cleat was HUGE and I
    had several close calls with serious ankle injuries.

    Ultimately I solved the problem by switching to mountain bike shoes. The MTB shoes have rubber
    "bumps" (normally called cleats, but I'm trying to avoid confusion here) on the bottom of the shoe
    that "hide" the metal cleat and don't allow it to touch the ground. I can run in these shoes with no
    problem and the they've worked great for about 6 races.

    The real competitors will no doubt argue that MTB shoes don't transfer power as well as road shoes.
    I don't really care, I'm not challenging anyone for the win and don't figure 10 seconds is going to
    affect me much. I just found a pair with a fairly stiff sole (which affects power transfer) and went
    with it. Do whatever works for you.

    Good luck, John

    On 7/10/03 1:16 PM, in article, "Kevin Garnier" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > David,
    >
    > From the past triathlons I've raced in, most people either have their shoes already clipped in
    > prior to mounting the bike and then put there feet in once up to speed, or change into their shoes
    > in transition and run with shoes on to the mount line. Personally, I've found it a royal pain
    > trying to get wet feet into the shoes if they're already clipped into the pedals. I've tried it a
    > few times in the past with varied success, sometimes it works great, others I've had to stop, get
    > off the bike completely and take the shoes off the pedals and put them on. If your really
    > concerned with time then I'd practice putting the shoes on once on the bike before the actual race
    > (its not impossible), but if you don't want to chance it, I'd suggest putting on the shoes in
    > transition and running the bike out (it'll proably take 10-15 seconds longer). You can run in the
    > shoes even with the odd-shaped clip on the bottom, just carefully. Hope this helps.
    >
    > Cheers, Kevin
    >
    > "David Matusow" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> I have recently switched to clipless pedals, and have the following question. I know that the top
    >> racers keep their cycling shoes clipped in, and just jump on the bike at T1, and then attach them
    >> while riding. Likewise, they detach them before dismounting at T2.
    >>
    >> I do not think that I will be able to get comfortable with this anytime soon. So, my question is,
    >> what does everyone else do? I have only done a few triathlons in the past, but some of them had a
    >> fairly long distance from the transition area to when you were allowed to mount the bike. If that
    >> is the case, do people just put on their shoes and run/walk in them until they can mount? Or, do
    >> they run barefoot or in socks until the mounting area, and then put on the shoes? I have Look
    >> brand clips, and it is very uncomfortable to walk in them, let alone run. But, it seems like it
    >> might not be a good idea to stop at the mount area to put on shoes. All advice is appreciated!
    >>
    >> Thanks, --David
    >>
    >> --
    >> David Matusow NASA / GSFC Email -> [email protected]
     
  7. John Hardt

    John Hardt Guest

    On 7/10/03 4:41 PM, in article [email protected], "cvcabran"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > A follow up question: I'm new to the sport and will be running my first duathlon in September. Can
    > I get away without using clipless pedals
    > (i.e. running shoes secured to the pedals with toe clips), or is this a total newbie mistake?
    >
    > --
    > This forum is a gateway to the rec.sport.triathlon usenet newsgroup. Any posts you make in this
    > forum will be propogated to usenet.

    IMHO, go with whatever you have for your first race. You'll see people out there with mountain bikes
    and basketball shoes.

    Once you decide whether or not you like the sport, you can worry about spending big bucks on
    new pedals.

    John
     
  8. "Harold Buck" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Do NOT do this until you're really comfortable with it. You could easily cause a crash that ends
    > someone else's day. Taking the shoes *OFF* while on the bike is much easier.

    This is the method I use. I don't really figure that I would save any time trying to fumble around
    with putting on shoes while pedaling. However the entrance to the transition area generally involves
    at least some coasting so I slip out of the shoes on the way in.

    > Running with cycling shoes is annoying, but you can use your bike to balance yourself. This
    > helps a lot.

    If you have the SPD cleats with the little rubber bumpers to each side it's not near as bad.

    James
     
  9. Harrow

    Harrow New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2003
    Messages:
    87
    Likes Received:
    0
    At the Australian Ironman in April, there was one guy who forgot to pack his cycling shoes into his transition bag. Can you believe he rode the entire 180km with bare feet on Look pedals?

    Even so, he still managed to qualify for Hawaii !!!

    I also saw a couple of people doing a Half-Ironman on mountain bikes, and getting reasonable times.

    So do whatever you want, and have fun. You might even save a few seconds in transistion not having to change shoes. ;)

    Regards,
    Harrow.
     
  10. Harold Buck

    Harold Buck Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    cvcabran <[email protected]> wrote:

    > A follow up question: I'm new to the sport and will be running my first duathlon in September. Can
    > I get away without using clipless pedals
    > (i.e. running shoes secured to the pedals with toe clips), or is this a total newbie mistake?

    Define "get away with."

    You can certainly do it, and you'll save time in transitions. It's impossible for us to answer
    whether the time you save in transition will be more or less than the time you lose biking by not
    using cycling shoes. My guess is that you'd be better off with the running shoes as a beginner.

    Unless you're worried about earning a medal, I'd say do what you're most comfortable with,
    and have fun!

    --Harold Buck

    "I used to rock and roll all night, and party every day. Then it was every other day. . . ."

    - Homer J. Simpson
     
  11. Harold Buck

    Harold Buck Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Harrow <[email protected]> wrote:

    > cvcabran wrote:
    > > A follow up question: I'm new to the sport and will be running my first duathlon in September.
    > > Can I get away without using clipless pedals
    > > (i.e. running shoes secured to the pedals with toe clips), or is this a total newbie mistake?
    >
    >
    >
    > At the Australian Ironman in April, there was one guy who forgot to pack his cycling shoes into
    > his transition bag. Can you believe he rode the entire 180km with bare feet on Look pedals?

    That's impressive, although so is the story about the guy at Ironman Lake Placid a few years back
    who did the whole race in a T-shirt and cutoff jeans. Oh, and he did the bike on a single-speed with
    a banana seat (or so they say).

    --Harold Buck

    "I used to rock and roll all night, and party every day. Then it was every other day. . . ."

    - Homer J. Simpson
     
  12. Harrow

    Harrow New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2003
    Messages:
    87
    Likes Received:
    0
    P.S. Here's the photo to prove it !

    http://www.ironmanoz.com/words-gall.asp?id=2003&offset=5
     
  13. Jim Gosse

    Jim Gosse Guest

    Now that's dedication.

    Jim

    "Harrow" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Harrow wrote:
    > > At the Australian Ironman in April, there was one guy who forgot to
    pack
    > > his cycling shoes into his transition bag. Can you believe he rode the entire 180km with bare
    > > feet on Look pedals? Even so, he still managed to qualify for Hawaii !!! I also saw a couple
    > > of people doing a Half-Ironman on mountain bikes, and getting reasonable times. So do whatever
    > > you want, and have fun. You might even save a few
    seconds
    > > in transistion not having to change shoes. ;) Regards, Harrow.
    >
    >
    >
    > P.S. Here's the photo to prove it !
    >
    > http://www.ironmanoz.com/words-gall.asp?id=2003&offset=5
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > This forum is a gateway to the rec.sport.triathlon usenet newsgroup. Any
    posts you make in this forum will be propogated to usenet.
     
  14. Jim Gosse

    Jim Gosse Guest

    Here's my two cents worth.

    I started with new shoes this year. I was intent on trying the pro method of clipping the shoes in
    and running through transition barefoot. Until I tried it in my driveway.

    I plan to put my shoes on, and run through transition..Hopefully I can get to the race early enough
    to get a spot relatively close to the exit so I don't have to run too far. My main concern is I use
    Speedplays, and the cleat is very high, and has a steel plate on the bottom. Steel and asphalt make
    for a slippery combo, but I think if I am careful, I will be ok.

    Best of luck. My first race of the season is a week away. check it out. http://www.triourworld.com/

    Jim

    "David Matusow" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I have recently switched to clipless pedals, and have the following question. I know that the top
    > racers keep their cycling shoes clipped in, and just jump on the bike at T1, and then attach them
    > while riding. Likewise, they detach them before dismounting at T2.
    >
    > I do not think that I will be able to get comfortable with this anytime soon. So, my question is,
    > what does everyone else do? I have only done a few triathlons in the past, but some of them had a
    > fairly long distance from the transition area to when you were allowed to mount the bike. If that
    > is the case, do people just put on their shoes and run/walk in them until they can mount? Or, do
    > they run barefoot or in socks until the mounting area, and then put on the shoes? I have Look
    > brand clips, and it is very uncomfortable to walk in them, let alone run. But, it seems like it
    > might not be a good idea to stop at the mount area to put on shoes. All advice is appreciated!
    >
    > Thanks, --David
    >
    > --
    > David Matusow NASA / GSFC Email -> [email protected]
     
  15. Mike Tennent

    Mike Tennent Guest

    Harold Buck <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >That's impressive, although so is the story about the guy at Ironman Lake Placid a few years back
    >who did the whole race in a T-shirt and cutoff jeans. Oh, and he did the bike on a single-speed
    >with a banana seat (or so they say).
    >

    I'm an eyewitness. He did it last year.

    He swam in baggies without a wetsuit, too.

    Mike Tennent "IronPenguin"
     
  16. "Mike Tennent" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Harold Buck <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >That's impressive, although so is the story about the guy at Ironman Lake Placid a few years back
    > >who did the whole race in a T-shirt and cutoff jeans. Oh, and he did the bike on a single-speed
    > >with a banana seat (or so they say).
    > >
    >
    > I'm an eyewitness. He did it last year.
    >
    > He swam in baggies without a wetsuit, too.

    So who's more nuts? Him or the guy who does the Vegas marathon in a full leather Elvis suit?

    James
     
  17. Harold Buck

    Harold Buck Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "James Goddard"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Mike Tennent" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Harold Buck <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > >That's impressive, although so is the story about the guy at Ironman Lake Placid a few years
    > > >back who did the whole race in a T-shirt and cutoff jeans. Oh, and he did the bike on a
    > > >single-speed with a banana seat (or so they say).
    > > >
    > >
    > > I'm an eyewitness. He did it last year.
    > >
    > > He swam in baggies without a wetsuit, too.
    >
    > So who's more nuts? Him or the guy who does the Vegas marathon in a full leather Elvis suit?

    Neither. It's the guy who does the marathons in an old-style diver's suit (several hundred
    pounds, I think).

    --Harold Buck

    "I used to rock and roll all night, and party every day. Then it was every other day. . . ."

    - Homer J. Simpson
     
  18. "Harold Buck" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, "James Goddard"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > "Mike Tennent" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > Harold Buck <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > > >That's impressive, although so is the story about the guy at Ironman Lake Placid a few years
    > > > >back who did the whole race in a T-shirt and cutoff jeans. Oh, and he did the bike on a
    > > > >single-speed with a banana seat (or so they say).
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > > I'm an eyewitness. He did it last year.
    > > >
    > > > He swam in baggies without a wetsuit, too.
    > >
    > > So who's more nuts? Him or the guy who does the Vegas marathon in a
    full
    > > leather Elvis suit?
    >
    >
    > Neither. It's the guy who does the marathons in an old-style diver's suit (several hundred pounds,
    > I think).

    Yea but the Elvis dude actually runs....and puts in a good time at that.

    James
     
  19. I use bike shoes with clipless and practice getting them on an off fast. It takes seconds
    with practice.

    "David Matusow" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > Hi,
    >
    > I have recently switched to clipless pedals, and have the following question. I know that the top
    > racers keep their cycling shoes clipped in, and just jump on the bike at T1, and then attach them
    > while riding. Likewise, they detach them before dismounting at T2.
    >
    > --David

    --
    Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG
     
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