Clipless pedals installation question.



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A

Azqaz

Guest
I just got my first set of clipless pedals, egg beater SS 2003's, and was wondering if there were
any gotchas I should watch out for when installing them and the cleats. I did a test after I
initially installed the cleats on my new Lake 201 extremes by snapping the pedal onto the cleat and
then twisting the pedal off by hand. I thought the cleats were on tight, but they rotated about 10
degrees on the shoes before they began to unclip. Obviously what I thought was tight enough wasn't
by a long shot, so I thought I'd better ask around to make sure I didn't screw something up.

Thanks Bryan
 
G

Geoff Adams

Guest
The egg beater cleats need to by tightened WAY DOWN on the shoe - or they will twist during
unclipping. Not good. Just make them SUPER tight. Not only that, there is a break-in period. The
cleats are actually designed to be worn down over time. So they get looser as you use them - but
they still hold nice. That's my experience, anyway. Alsoo, make sure you install them with the
dotted cleat on the right shoe, to give you a 15 degree release as opposed to 20.

-Geoff

azqaz wrote:
> I just got my first set of clipless pedals, egg beater SS 2003's, and was wondering if there were
> any gotchas I should watch out for when installing them and the cleats. I did a test after I
> initially installed the cleats on my new Lake 201 extremes by snapping the pedal onto the cleat
> and then twisting the pedal off by hand. I thought the cleats were on tight, but they rotated
> about 10 degrees on the shoes before they began to unclip. Obviously what I thought was tight
> enough wasn't by a long shot, so I thought I'd better ask around to make sure I didn't screw
> something up.
>
> Thanks Bryan
 

Ben

New Member
Mar 13, 2003
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I can't speak for egg beaters, but with SPDs, and I assume with egg beaters, you should put a dot of lub on each screw before you fasten the clips to your shoes. Shoes, of course, tend to get wet. Water causes rust. Rusted screws will be nearly impossible to get out later. So, a little preventive lube can save having to drill out the screws.

Let us know how you like them.

Ben
>>>>Burley Canto>>>>
 

Ben

New Member
Mar 13, 2003
68
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Ooops....of course, that's "lube" not "lub"

Dang computers!!!!

LOL
Ben
 

Rick Lindsey

New Member
Apr 17, 2003
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Originally posted by Geoff Adams

they still hold nice. That's my experience, anyway. Alsoo, make sure you install them with the
dotted cleat on the right shoe, to give you a 15 degree release as opposed to 20.

-Geoff

Does that give both shoes a 15 degree release or just the right shoe? I'm not sure why you would want different release angles on each foot (it didn't occur to me until after I started this reply that perhaps that's not what you are advocating).

-Rick
 
M

Mike

Guest
if you have a swb bike wear heavy gloves when removing the original pedals on the bike. also make
sure the chain is on the big chain ring. you hands will thank you, very deep chainring punctures
holes in hand otherwise!
 
G

Geoff Adams

Guest
Eggbeater cleats offer the choice of 15 or 20 degree release for BOTH feet, depending upon which
foot each cleat is on. Does that make sense? The cleats are asymmetrical to accommodate this. When
the dotted cleat is the right foot - assuming that one twists out of the pedal to the right - the
cleat releases at 15 degrees. With the undotted cleat on the left - again assuming a twist out to
teh left - THAT cleat will release at 15 degrees. Swap, them, and the release angle is 20 degrees.
Did I describe that right?

-Geoff

Rick Lindsey wrote:
> Geoff Adams wrote:
> > they still hold nice. That's my experience, anyway. Alsoo, make sure you install them with the
> > dotted cleat on the right shoe, to give you a 15 degree release as opposed to 20. -Geoff
>
>
>
> Does that give both shoes a 15 degree release or just the right shoe? I'm not sure why you would
> want different release angles on each foot (it didn't occur to me until after I started this reply
> that perhaps that's not what you are advocating).
>
> -Rick
>
>
>
> --
>
>>--------------------------<
>
> Posted via cyclingforums.com http://www.cyclingforums.com
 

heater

New Member
Jul 6, 2003
46
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So, uh, if one were to not lube the screws and decide at a way later date that the cleats needed to be removed, do you have any suggestions on how one would remove the rusted, embedded with dirt and whatnot screws?

Originally posted by Ben
I can't speak for egg beaters, but with SPDs, and I assume with egg beaters, you should put a dot of lub on each screw before you fasten the clips to your shoes. Shoes, of course, tend to get wet. Water causes rust. Rusted screws will be nearly impossible to get out later. So, a little preventive lube can save having to drill out the screws.

Let us know how you like them.

Ben
>>>>Burley Canto>>>>
 
A

Azqaz

Guest
heater <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> Ben wrote:
> > I can't speak for egg beaters, but with SPDs, and I assume with egg beaters, you should put a
> > dot of lub on each screw before you fasten the clips to your shoes. Shoes, of course, tend to
> > get wet. Water causes rust. Rusted screws will be nearly impossible to get out later. So, a
> > little preventive lube can save having to drill out the screws. Let us know how you like
> > them. Ben
> > >>>>Burley Canto>>>>
>
> So, uh, if one were to not lube the screws and decide at a way later date that the cleats needed
> to be removed, do you have any suggestions on how one would remove the rusted, embedded with dirt
> and whatnot screws?

Ohh, ohh. I can answer this one Mister Cotter. Lots of penetrating oil and some nice quality hex
wrenches. Been there, done that. The hard way. Other than my screw ups, I love my beaters. Now I
need a faster bent.

Any sugestions for an upgrade to an ATP R40? I like it for comfort, but I find myself in the second
front gear, and seventh rear gear in my short, less than 20 mile, rides. Should I just go to the
third chainring?, or go for something else?

The giro seems the next step, but several people have complained about the Kwests on the giro, and I
have liked the kwests on my R40. The R40 is a nice bike, but I seem to be nearing it's top end. I
have decided I like the SWB geometry, and am looking for something else.

Thanks Bryan.
 
T

Tom Sherman

Guest
heater wrote:
>
> Ben wrote:
> > I can't speak for egg beaters, but with SPDs, and I assume with egg beaters, you should put a
> > dot of lub on each screw before you fasten the clips to your shoes. Shoes, of course, tend to
> > get wet. Water causes rust. Rusted screws will be nearly impossible to get out later. So, a
> > little preventive lube can save having to drill out the screws. Let us know how you like
> > them. Ben
> > >>>>Burley Canto>>>>
>
> So, uh, if one were to not lube the screws and decide at a way later date that the cleats needed
> to be removed, do you have any suggestions on how one would remove the rusted, embedded with dirt
> and whatnot screws?

I just replaced the SPuD cleats on a three-year-old pair of shoes, since pedal engagement was
getting dodgy due to cleat wear. I had used some Pro Gold grease on the mounting screws during
initial installation, and three of the four screws were easily removed. For the fourth, after
initially partially stripping the head, I tapped on a new hex key with a plastic mallet to make sure
it was fully seated in the screw head and then turned it with a Vise-Grips [1]. The screw made loud
protesting noises, but came loose.

As another poster suggested, penetrating oil would be a good idea if there was corrosion present
between the screw and mounting plate.

[1] Invented by an expatriate Dane living in the US.

Tom Sherman - Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)
 
D

Dave Larrington

Guest
heater wrote:

> So, uh, if one were to not lube the screws and decide at a way later date that the cleats needed
> to be removed, do you have any suggestions on how one would remove the rusted, embedded with dirt
> and whatnot screws?

Having had some experience of this with screws whose heads have been chewed to bits, thereby
preventing a screwdriver from Getting A Grip, I have removed them thus:

o with a hacksaw, cut the old cleat into as many pieces as necessary to allow the removal of the
wreckage o fasten self-locking pliers to offending bolts, lock down, twist vigourously

Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
===========================================================
Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
===========================================================
 
D

Don

Guest
I just removed four year old SPD-style cleats from my shoes and discovered an amazing thing. The
heads are self-protecting. I thought I was going to have a terrible problem with ruined hex openings
caused by four years of wear from crud. It seems they packed themselves full initially and then that
was it. They never got any worse or wore the hex opening. The grit in them protected them from
further wear. I was amazed at how easy they came out. It just took a couple of minutes to dig the
crud out with an ice pick. The grease I put on the threads during installation also helped.
 
F

Freewheeling

Guest
Another way: Drill them out, leaving the threads intact. Most bike shops will do it for a nominal
fee, like five bucks. Been there, done that. :)

--
--Scott [email protected] Cut the "tail" to send email.

"azqaz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> heater <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> > Ben wrote:
> > > I can't speak for egg beaters, but with SPDs, and I assume with egg beaters, you should put
> > > a dot of lub on each screw before you fasten
the
> > > clips to your shoes. Shoes, of course, tend to get wet. Water causes rust. Rusted screws
> > > will be nearly impossible to get out later. So,
a
> > > little preventive lube can save having to drill out the screws. Let us know how you like
> > > them. Ben
> > > >>>>Burley Canto>>>>
> >
> > So, uh, if one were to not lube the screws and decide at a way later date that the cleats needed
> > to be removed, do you have any suggestions on how one would remove the rusted, embedded with
> > dirt and whatnot screws?
>
> Ohh, ohh. I can answer this one Mister Cotter. Lots of penetrating oil and some nice quality hex
> wrenches. Been there, done that. The hard way. Other than my screw ups, I love my beaters. Now I
> need a faster bent.
>
> Any sugestions for an upgrade to an ATP R40? I like it for comfort, but I find myself in the
> second front gear, and seventh rear gear in my short, less than 20 mile, rides. Should I just go
> to the third chainring?, or go for something else?
>
> The giro seems the next step, but several people have complained about the Kwests on the giro, and
> I have liked the kwests on my R40. The R40 is a nice bike, but I seem to be nearing it's top end.
> I have decided I like the SWB geometry, and am looking for something else.
>
> Thanks Bryan.
 
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