Clipless pedals-mtb/road

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Chris Bryson, Feb 16, 2005.

  1. Chris Bryson

    Chris Bryson New Member

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    Hi Question from an aged thicky.
    Whats the benefit of single sided clipless pedals. I use an MTB and a road bike both with spd,s. I have a pair of road "Look" pedals but find them far more difficult to clip into than the double sided spd,s and I am able to wear and walk in the same shoes on both bikes. I dont ride seriously other than for excercise so is there any benefit in using the road pedals

    Many Thanks :confused: Chris
     
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  2. ganderctr

    ganderctr New Member

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    For one, there's a wider platform on the road shoes, which means they're more comfortable. Secondly, road shoes and cleats are marginally lighter than their MTB counterparts. I ride a set of SPD-SL pedals and they're not hard to get into, it does take getting used to though.
     
  3. jmoryl

    jmoryl New Member

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    Many people will tell you that using SPD type cleats (possibly with MTB or other walkable shoes) on the road will lead to all sorts of problems. I've been doing just this for some time and have no problem with hot spots, numb toes, pulling out, etc. etc. You can get some cheap SPD pedals (road or MTB, if you prefer double sided) for $20-$30 and try this for awhile; that is probably the only way to tell if it is right for you.

    Joe
     
  4. capwater

    capwater New Member

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    Coming from the mtb world, I initially used my spds on my road bike because I wasn't ready to spring for a new pair of shoes. Even buying a cheap pair of shoes and some used Look pedals was a big improvement, especially in clipping in. That being said, if you are comfortable with spds then all is well.
     
  5. TKOS

    TKOS New Member

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    If they are comfy for you and you are not racing then go to town with the SPD's. This is my first season of racing and I am using SPD's as I am most comfortable with them. As I get more confortable with the whole racing scene I may then opt to try a different shoe.
     
  6. RC2

    RC2 New Member

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    I do both MTB and road, mostly road. In road, your legs are doing repetitive motions very quickly for a long period of time, and you seldom clip in/out (vs. mountain...pedal like mad for a ways, brake-turn-cost-pedal, jump off/on, pedal like mad again...etc...). I've used my SPD's on the road and ended up w/sore knees and feet. Most road pedals have plenty of float (I need this), a bigger platform (not a biggie to me w/stiff soles), and because you only clip in/out once or twice per typical ride, who cares if you have to flip the pedal over w/your toe? (Actually I'm using speedplay these days which are dual-sidded.) Another difference -- dirt doesn't effect the SPD mechanism to the extent that it effects some road pedal/cleats.
     
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