close calls w/animals

Discussion in 'The Bike Cafe' started by Ed Roy, Sep 22, 2003.

  1. gntlmn

    gntlmn New Member

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    That's a good one. heh heh heh.
     


  2. Ed Roy

    Ed Roy New Member

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    a buddy of mine from NH told me that the only way to beat a bear
    is to go down hill, short forelegs will make them tumble
     
  3. gntlmn

    gntlmn New Member

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    I heard the same thing here in Alaska. I'd still hate to see a 1500 lb Alaska brown bear coming at me from uphill. I bet it's true, but that's one enormous bear.

    One guy told me its nervous system is so strong, it can take a bullet through the heart and still keep running a couple of miles before they finally collapse.

    I only saw one brown bear in the city limits in Anchorage in many years, and I was out and about often. I wasn't on my bike; I was in the car. It was 4:00 am, and I saw him in the middle of a major road next to a new car dealership. At first I was wondering what this idiot in an ape suit was doing in the middle of the road at 400 am. When I got closer, I could see it was a brown bear. He bolted toward the car dealership, and I saw him leap completely over a full size sedan without even touching it. I looked for it from the car, but it was long gone without a trace.

    I like to give animals some space, especially when I'm on the bike. Sometimes, I find myself hoping that the moose remember my smell and that I never harmed them if I should ever accidentally venture too close. I'm not so sure moose are that smart though.
     
  4. cfsmtb

    cfsmtb New Member

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    teehee, yeah, we understand. Accidentally ran over my dawg 4 years ago. Betty is a Blue Heeler x Kelpie. We used to go out pedalling together, she would run along side for literally miles. She walked out in front of the bike, both wheels went right over. She yelped loudly and less than 15 secs later was off sniffing something interesting. I felt like absolute sh*t, got her to the vet, who mentioned that heelers were the 4WD's of the dawg world (translation Aus. 4WD=SUV) Everything was fine, no injuries. Sadly it was a sign she was going blind. Happily Bet's still bumbling around, approx 16 years of age, as bomb proof as ever.:) She doesn't wear dark glasses, but I now double as her seeing eye human.
     
  5. Ratface

    Ratface New Member

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    I had a pigeon fly into my front wheel many years ago as I was bolting down a hill. It didn't get caught - it sort of bounced out again. I don't think it died, but it can't have done it much good!

    I saw my first wild elk the other day. I cycled around a corner and was focussing on my computer display. Then I heard a thumping sound from a small field to my right and looked up to see a young bull elk about 6 metres away. It had seen me and was in the process of whirling around in fright before it thudded away - in the oposite direction thank goodness!

    They're mad creatures - but I agree with gntlmn that I wouldn't want one charging right at me! Here in Sweden they say there are over 30,000 elk/car accident per year! Amazing that there are so many. Of course because elks have long stilt-like legs, they are the perfect height to come through a car windscreen if hit square on. Scary stuff! At least on a bike it's probably easier to maneuver around them.
     
  6. gntlmn

    gntlmn New Member

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    You must have more elk in Sweden than we have moose in Alaska, and I thought we had a lot of moose. I've seen some pretty bad wreckage from moose. One was a Honda Civic which had its roof completely ripped off. The woman driver was smart enough to lie on the floor and was unharmed.

    Often I come ride on the bike trail up to a group of people on one side of a moose or moose group, and you can see the others on the other side of the moose as well. We all wait as the moose keep on eating or just standing. They don't give us as much notice as we would give to flies. Usually they move within 15 minutes.

    Often, I could clearly ride away from the moose, but I don't think it's very responsible to ride past them while they are so close to pedestrians. Sure, I would probably get by, but if they get riled up, they just might attack the pedestrians. I always try to respect the moose. I have been up close to one face to face sort of by accident when I was cross country skiing on the same bike path, and I think its head was about 10 feet tall with a huge rack. I was glad to get out alive and told myself I would never try to be so bold again, on bike, on foot, even in a car. It's best not to be too impatient.
     
  7. nomad

    nomad New Member

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    There are actually no elk in Sweden but plenty of moose :)
    Elk is english for a medium size north american deer. Swedish moose are 99,9 % identical to alaskan, just slightly smaller (up to approx. 400kg). During my time in Sweden I once hit a moose with my car, but I had time to aim so it only mashed the whole side of the car instead of coming through the windshield. Also met moose a couple of time while on my motorbike. Once me and the moose of the day did a 5-minute staring match while I revved the engine, hooted, etc. I eventually gave up, shut down the engine and waited....

    It eventually decided that I was boring and slowly wandered off like I wasn't even there.
     
  8. gntlmn

    gntlmn New Member

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    They treat us like flies, indeed.

    I talked to a neighbor who had been waiting 2 1/2 hours for a moose to move away from his car. I wondered why he didn't just enter from the other side. He told me that he had witnessed a moose total a VW bug a few years before when the driver beeepbeepbeeped its irritating horn at the moose. The moose turned around and smashed the hood of the car in, destroying it.

    I try to wait for moose when I see pedestrians if I'm on a bike. Maybe that way, the moose won't get mad and take it out on the helpless people on foot.
     
  9. nomad

    nomad New Member

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    So, if you don't see pedestrians you just go ahead? What if the moose doesn't like your smell and goes for you? Do you cycle faster than a moose can run!? I'm deeply impressed... ;)
     
  10. gntlmn

    gntlmn New Member

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    No. I usually am very conservative around moose. I usually wait longer than I really need to to be safe. I failed to mention that one pedestrian urged me to pedal on once this summer because we both knew I could make it considering the way the moose were facing and that they were busy with munching on plants. I refused because I thought there was a very small risk that the moose would go for the pedestrians. I think I would have been past the people on the other side of the moose before the moose could react. They wouldn't have noticed me coming up quietly. So it's like the bear problem above. I would have had other victims between myself and the moose. The moose would probably attack them first. But I don't know quite that much about moose to be really sure.

    When I ride past moose is when I don't see anybody waiting, and I am upon the moose before I realize it is there. It happens every once in a while, more often than I'd like. I don't know how it would turn out if the moose chased me. The adrenalin would kick in pretty heavy I suppose. Probably not enough though. I would ride into the trees and try to hide behind one, keep on moving.

    The only wild animal that I recall at the moment I had chase me (dogs don't count) is a fox a couple of years ago. I was coming around a bend in the fall into an industrial area, and down from the hill to the left, I could see something coming down the hill in the distance. It was coming pretty fast. I looked back when I had pedaled a little further down the road, and I could see it was a fox. I had followed this fox from a distance a couple of weeks before, always stopping when it stopped, maintaining the distance between us. When it got close to heavier traffic, it ran off into the brush.

    Now it was following me. How do I know it was the same one? Because they are territorial, and this is only about 300 meters from where I followed it before. I learned this from a military guy who, in his own words, "had nothing better to do" in his "spare time than to follow and record the whereabouts" of this same fox for a month. I looked back again. Now I could see that he was getting very close, and he was running fast but effortlessly. They have long legs compared to body and kind of lope like an antelope. I could see it was not breathing through its mouth, just its nose. It was that close.

    That's when I got scared. I heard about 80% of foxes are carriers of rabies, but don't seem to succumb to it easily. They are carriers. It occurred to me that maybe rabies was what was getting him motivated to catch me.

    That's when I really started cranking. I was surprised. When I turned my head again, he had faded back, but he still had his mouth closed. He had lost interest. I suppose he had called my bluff from my other episode (even though it was just curiousity on my part) and had won. Alaska natives tell me that foxes out in the village sometimes do false charges like that to mess with you. I was glad it didn't catch me.

    It's funny how one animal encounter memory triggers another.
     
  11. Memphmann

    Memphmann New Member

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    Years ago when I was training on this one route. Near the top of this climb, was a farmhouse, with a dog that would always chase. sure made you climb the last little bit faster. This never really bothered me. Until my friend got bit and the damn owner never did anything about. So on my next ride, I allowed the mutt to get close and emptied my entire waterbottle on his face. This sure made him stop as my bottle was filled with bleach. Never saw this dog again.

    One of the few times I actually rode my old mtb. I was riding up this old wagon trail and was paced by a bear. It was a brown and was 150 feet below the trail. Was not chasing me, just staying behind and pacing me. I believe it was a female with cubs near by. Sure gave me a fright.......

    Memph
     
  12. Jakub

    Jakub New Member

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    On a mid summer late afternoon I was climbing the Whiteface mountain, NY. On the way up I averaged 9 mph and the flies were feeding on my back like on a road-kill. On the way down I averaged 36 and the revenge was sweet ... well, kinda tasteless to be honest.
     
  13. Jakub

    Jakub New Member

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    On a mid summer late afternoon I was climbing the Whiteface mountain, NY. On the way up I averaged 9 mph and the flies were feeding on my back like on a road-kill. On the way down I averaged 36 and the revenge was sweet ... well, kinda tasteless to be honest.
     
  14. lumpy

    lumpy New Member

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    You probably never saw him again because the bleach destroyed his eyes and he died a miserable and painful death.

    Tim
     
  15. Jakub

    Jakub New Member

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    I was going down the hill, probably around 35 mph when a mature groundhog jumped from tall grass on the side of the road straight in front of my wheel. I only remember thinking, “oh my, I going to crash!” and I tightened the grip on the handlebar. It felt like a small bump, like riding over a pillow. A second later I was shocked and surprised to still be on the bike. The poor "ball of fur" did not make it though :(

    Two years later, I was riding behind Brian, 25 maybe 27mph when a small dog ran across the road and started barking very close to Brian’s left pedal. “It will chase us for a moment and run back home” I thought and we both accelerated. A moment later the dog jumped in the two feet space between my front and Brian’s rear wheel. Remembering the groundhog I tightened the grip. The dog fell on its side and my front wheel climbed on top of its chest. Then the poor animal must have felt the pain, jerked its torso and its hind legs caught my wheel pulling it to the side. The next thing I remember was Brian saying: “Jakub, your helmet is cracked.” Lots of lost skin and damaged gear. The dog seemed OK.
     
  16. Memphmann

    Memphmann New Member

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    So what! The dog got what he deserved. Made our ride much more enjoyable :)

    Memph
     
  17. gntlmn

    gntlmn New Member

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    I heard about another guy that did something similar to this with a doberman pinscher. The owner would not keep the dog in the yard and refused to pen it up. It kept chasing these two riders every time they went by. So one of them got fed up and brought a baseball bat the next time. When it caught up to him and tried to bite him, he simply swung the bat at its head, killing the dog instantly--no pain. I suppose the owner is the one who felt the pain because he carried the corpse and dropped it on the porch and rang the doorbell, then rode away.

    I feel sorry for the dog, but not the owner. The owner is the one at fault.
     
  18. Jakub

    Jakub New Member

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    The dog is just a stupid animal, no different from a deer or elk. It is the OWNER that ought to feel the pain. Unfortunately I was too busy working/riding to find the sob (dob?) and sue.
     
  19. lumpy

    lumpy New Member

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    Dogs do what their instincts tell them. I think what's stupid is knowing that dog will be there and not avoiding him or using the law to deal with it. Memphman never had a problem with the dog 'cause he is fast, but after his friend got bit he goes a huntin the next day with a H20 bottle full of bleach for revenge. That's %$#@ sick man. Out here in the rest of the world we have something called "Animal Control" - ya know like the pound? You call it in and they deal with the dog and the owner.

    I agree the owners are at fault but why do you take such pleasure in what you did to the dog? #@[email protected] sick man.

    Tim
     
  20. Jakub

    Jakub New Member

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    lumpy, if you are talking to me, I suggest you edit you message when you sober up.
     
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