Cobalt Chloride - Cheaper Than EPO - Not On UCI Radar

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Joe King, Mar 21, 2006.

  1. Joe King

    Joe King Guest

    G Lippi, M Franchini, and G C Guidi, Cobalt chloride administration in
    athletes: a new perspective in blood doping?, British Journal of Sports
    Medicine, Nov 2005; 39: 872 - 873.

    http://bjsm.bmjjournals.com/cgi/sea...=&fulltext=cobalt+chloride&volume=&firstpage=

    ABSTRACT

    Blood doping is an illegal and unfair way of enhancing athletic performance
    by increasing the oxygen carrying capacity of the blood. Currently used
    methods usually involve stimulation of erythropoiesis. Gene therapy
    targeting the hypoxia inducible factor pathway may be an attractive
    alternative to traditional blood doping techniques. Hypoxia activates a
    large number of genes with essential roles in cell and tissue adaptation to
    low oxygen. Cobalt chloride is a well established chemical inducer of
    hypoxia-like responses such as erythropoiesis. Cobalt supplementation is
    not banned and therefore would not be detected by current anti-doping
    testing. Although there is as yet no direct or anecdotal evidence of cobalt
    chloride administration to athletes, its use should be warned against as
    being not only unfair but potentially dangerous.
     
    Tags:


  2. RicodJour

    RicodJour Guest

    Joe King wrote:
    > G Lippi, M Franchini, and G C Guidi, Cobalt chloride administration in
    > athletes: a new perspective in blood doping?, British Journal of Sports
    > Medicine, Nov 2005; 39: 872 - 873.
    >
    > http://bjsm.bmjjournals.com/cgi/sea...=&fulltext=cobalt+chloride&volume=&firstpage=
    >
    > ABSTRACT
    >
    > Blood doping is an illegal and unfair way of enhancing athletic performance
    > by increasing the oxygen carrying capacity of the blood. Currently used
    > methods usually involve stimulation of erythropoiesis. Gene therapy
    > targeting the hypoxia inducible factor pathway may be an attractive
    > alternative to traditional blood doping techniques. Hypoxia activates a
    > large number of genes with essential roles in cell and tissue adaptation to
    > low oxygen. Cobalt chloride is a well established chemical inducer of
    > hypoxia-like responses such as erythropoiesis. Cobalt supplementation is
    > not banned and therefore would not be detected by current anti-doping
    > testing. Although there is as yet no direct or anecdotal evidence of cobalt
    > chloride administration to athletes, its use should be warned against as
    > being not only unfair but potentially dangerous.


    http://www.ilo.org/public/english/protection/safework/cis/products/icsc/dtasht/_icsc07/icsc0783.htm

    Why don't they just legalize "safe" drugs and categorize
    classifications based on those?

    In breaking news, Jonathan Page sprinted to victory in the Unlimited
    THC Pro category...

    R
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Joe King" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > G Lippi, M Franchini, and G C Guidi, Cobalt chloride administration in
    > athletes: a new perspective in blood doping?, British Journal of Sports
    > Medicine, Nov 2005; 39: 872 - 873.
    >
    > http://bjsm.bmjjournals.com/cgi/sea...=&fulltext=cobalt+chloride&volume=&firstpage=
    >
    > ABSTRACT
    >
    > Blood doping is an illegal and unfair way of enhancing athletic performance
    > by increasing the oxygen carrying capacity of the blood. Currently used
    > methods usually involve stimulation of erythropoiesis. Gene therapy
    > targeting the hypoxia inducible factor pathway may be an attractive
    > alternative to traditional blood doping techniques. Hypoxia activates a
    > large number of genes with essential roles in cell and tissue adaptation to
    > low oxygen. Cobalt chloride is a well established chemical inducer of
    > hypoxia-like responses such as erythropoiesis. Cobalt supplementation is
    > not banned and therefore would not be detected by current anti-doping
    > testing. Although there is as yet no direct or anecdotal evidence of cobalt
    > chloride administration to athletes, its use should be warned against as
    > being not only unfair but potentially dangerous.


    `Potentially dangerous.' How about simply `dangerous.'

    --
    Michael Press
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    >
    >G Lippi, M Franchini, and G C Guidi, Cobalt chloride administration in
    >athletes: a new perspective in blood doping?, British Journal of Sports
    >Medicine, Nov 2005; 39: 872 - 873.
    >
    >http://bjsm.bmjjournals.com/cgi/search?andorexactfulltext=and&resourcetype=1&d

    isp_type=&sortspec=relevance&author1=&fulltext=cobalt+chloride&volume=&firstpag
    e=
    >
    >ABSTRACT
    >
    >Blood doping is an illegal and unfair way of enhancing athletic performance
    >by increasing the oxygen carrying capacity of the blood. Currently used
    >methods usually involve stimulation of erythropoiesis. Gene therapy
    >targeting the hypoxia inducible factor pathway may be an attractive
    >alternative to traditional blood doping techniques. Hypoxia activates a
    >large number of genes with essential roles in cell and tissue adaptation to
    >low oxygen. Cobalt chloride is a well established chemical inducer of
    >hypoxia-like responses such as erythropoiesis. Cobalt supplementation is
    >not banned and therefore would not be detected by current anti-doping
    >testing. Although there is as yet no direct or anecdotal evidence of cobalt
    >chloride administration to athletes, its use should be warned against as
    >being not only unfair but potentially dangerous.


    hypoxia = lack of oxygen. Why not just choke the athlete? That might be
    the next doping scandal.
    -------------
    Alex
     
  5. RicodJour

    RicodJour Guest

    Michael Press wrote:
    >
    > `Potentially dangerous.' How about simply `dangerous.'


    You're not in marketing or a lawyer, are ya? They have to cover their
    asses while still trying to sell the stuff. You know - lie.

    R
     
  6. Bill C

    Bill C Guest

    Michael Press wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Joe King" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > G Lippi, M Franchini, and G C Guidi, Cobalt chloride administration in
    > > athletes: a new perspective in blood doping?, British Journal of Sports
    > > Medicine, Nov 2005; 39: 872 - 873.
    > >
    > > http://bjsm.bmjjournals.com/cgi/sea...=&fulltext=cobalt+chloride&volume=&firstpage=
    > >
    > > ABSTRACT
    > >
    > > Blood doping is an illegal and unfair way of enhancing athletic performance
    > > by increasing the oxygen carrying capacity of the blood. Currently used
    > > methods usually involve stimulation of erythropoiesis. Gene therapy
    > > targeting the hypoxia inducible factor pathway may be an attractive
    > > alternative to traditional blood doping techniques. Hypoxia activates a
    > > large number of genes with essential roles in cell and tissue adaptation to
    > > low oxygen. Cobalt chloride is a well established chemical inducer of
    > > hypoxia-like responses such as erythropoiesis. Cobalt supplementation is
    > > not banned and therefore would not be detected by current anti-doping
    > > testing. Although there is as yet no direct or anecdotal evidence of cobalt
    > > chloride administration to athletes, its use should be warned against as
    > > being not only unfair but potentially dangerous.

    >
    > `Potentially dangerous.' How about simply `dangerous.'
    >
    > --
    > Michael Press


    You have any idea, of anything, that isn't potentially dangerous?Just
    about everything, used in the right situation is dangerous.
    It's kinda like the warnings that "It may be harmful to stick this
    product up your nose".
    Bill C
     
  7. On 22 Mar 2006 12:40:56 -0800, "RicodJour" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >You're not in marketing or a lawyer, are ya? They have to cover their
    >asses while still trying to sell the stuff. You know - lie.


    Wouldn't that be 'potentially lie'?
     
  8. On 22 Mar 2006 12:55:09 -0800, "Bill C" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > You have any idea, of anything, that isn't potentially dangerous?Just
    >about everything, used in the right situation is dangerous.
    >It's kinda like the warnings that "It may be harmful to stick this
    >product up your nose".
    >Bill C


    And then hundreds of thousands of teenagers that, until then, had
    never thought to stick it up their noses, immediately proceed to do
    so...

    Curtis L. Russell
    Odenton, MD (USa)
    Just someone on two wheels...
     
  9. RicodJour

    RicodJour Guest

    Curtis L. Russell wrote:
    > On 22 Mar 2006 12:40:56 -0800, "RicodJour" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >You're not in marketing or a lawyer, are ya? They have to cover their
    > >asses while still trying to sell the stuff. You know - lie.

    >
    > Wouldn't that be 'potentially lie'?


    Right. Hypothetically speaking, a potential transgressor might, under
    the proper set of circumstances, and given suitable motivation, find
    their interests best served, based on their knowledge at the time, to
    lie.

    Is that better?

    R
     
  10. In article
    <[email protected]>,
    "RicodJour" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Curtis L. Russell wrote:
    > > On 22 Mar 2006 12:40:56 -0800, "RicodJour" <[email protected]>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > > >You're not in marketing or a lawyer, are ya? They have to cover their
    > > >asses while still trying to sell the stuff. You know - lie.

    > >
    > > Wouldn't that be 'potentially lie'?

    >
    > Right. Hypothetically speaking, a potential transgressor might, under
    > the proper set of circumstances, and given suitable motivation, find
    > their interests best served, based on their knowledge at the time, to
    > lie.

    ^^^
    That is so harsh.
    Utter a terminological inexactitude.

    > Is that better?


    Better.

    --
    Michael Press
     
  11. "Carl Sundquist" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:m%[email protected]
    >A bit more clarification, but not by much.
    >
    > http://www.ergogenics.org/169.html
    >


    Ya gotta love this part:

    "The final result of this induction is enhanced erythropoietin production
    and more efficient stimulation of the erythropoietic response, achievable at
    the moderate oral dose of 30 mg/kg."

    "In addition, it has been reported that liver, kidney, and heart accumulates
    cobalt to a greater extent, causing hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, organ
    damage and dysfunction, even at a dose of 33.3 mg/kg."
     
  12. Howard Kveck

    Howard Kveck Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Curtis L. Russell <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 22 Mar 2006 12:55:09 -0800, "Bill C" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > > You have any idea, of anything, that isn't potentially dangerous?Just
    > >about everything, used in the right situation is dangerous.
    > >It's kinda like the warnings that "It may be harmful to stick this
    > >product up your nose".
    > >Bill C

    >
    > And then hundreds of thousands of teenagers that, until then, had
    > never thought to stick it up their noses, immediately proceed to do
    > so...


    Unless their parents have suggested it.

    --
    tanx,
    Howard

    Grandma Smith said a curious thing
    Boys must whistle, girls must sing

    remove YOUR SHOES to reply, ok?
     
  13. On 22 Mar 2006 13:57:57 -0800, "RicodJour" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >Curtis L. Russell wrote:
    >> On 22 Mar 2006 12:40:56 -0800, "RicodJour" <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >> >You're not in marketing or a lawyer, are ya? They have to cover their
    >> >asses while still trying to sell the stuff. You know - lie.

    >>
    >> Wouldn't that be 'potentially lie'?

    >
    >Right. Hypothetically speaking, a potential transgressor might, under
    >the proper set of circumstances, and given suitable motivation, find
    >their interests best served, based on their knowledge at the time, to
    >lie.
    >
    >Is that better?
    >
    >R


    Indubitably.

    Curtis L. Russell
    Odenton, MD (USa)
    Just someone on two wheels...
     
  14. On Wed, 22 Mar 2006 19:52:20 -0800, Howard Kveck
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > Curtis L. Russell <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On 22 Mar 2006 12:55:09 -0800, "Bill C" <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >> > You have any idea, of anything, that isn't potentially dangerous?Just
    >> >about everything, used in the right situation is dangerous.
    >> >It's kinda like the warnings that "It may be harmful to stick this
    >> >product up your nose".
    >> >Bill C

    >>
    >> And then hundreds of thousands of teenagers that, until then, had
    >> never thought to stick it up their noses, immediately proceed to do
    >> so...

    >
    > Unless their parents have suggested it.


    I think parents suggesting things to teenagers is right there with
    trees falling in forests and nobody to hear. Except more noise, less
    hearing.

    Curtis L. Russell
    Odenton, MD (USa)
    Just someone on two wheels...
     
Loading...