Coconut Oil Benefits?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Rob, Mar 10, 2006.

  1. Rob

    Rob Guest

    >From time to time I have seen references in posts in this ng on coconut
    oil. Are the health claims true and what research is available to
    support the claims. Most of what I've been hearing about it over the
    years is negative! A store in my area sells certified organic, expeller
    pressed and free of solvents and additives. What's the real scoop on
    coconut oil?

    Thanks.

    Rob
     
    Tags:


  2. Stuart

    Stuart Guest

    Those with lactose intolerance often use it along with virgin olive oil to
    replace butter. It is better in a vegetable stir fry than olive oil, but it
    has a very low flash point. Be careful you keep the heat low so you don't
    oxidize it too much (it smokes easily) or start a fire. It's main benefit is
    that it is lower in arachidonic acid (AA) than olive oil. AA induces an
    inflammatory reaction in some people's guts causing problems. Many people
    think it tastes better than olive oil in cooking. I haven't seen any
    research of value on the coconut oil. It's more on avoiding AA.
    Stuart//
    "Rob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > >From time to time I have seen references in posts in this ng on coconut

    > oil. Are the health claims true and what research is available to
    > support the claims. Most of what I've been hearing about it over the
    > years is negative! A store in my area sells certified organic, expeller
    > pressed and free of solvents and additives. What's the real scoop on
    > coconut oil?
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > Rob
    >
     
  3. Scotch

    Scotch Guest

    Rob wrote:
    > >From time to time I have seen references in posts in this ng on coconut

    > oil. Are the health claims true and what research is available to
    > support the claims. Most of what I've been hearing about it over the
    > years is negative! A store in my area sells certified organic, expeller
    > pressed and free of solvents and additives. What's the real scoop on
    > coconut oil?
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > Rob



    >From a Chemists' point of view....Coconut oil is so widely used and so

    well known because it is super cheap to produce!! It's benefits, if
    any, would be very questionable. One of my old professors even laughed
    at the idea of coconut oil being used in lotions to moisturize skin
    when (according to him) it is more likely to end up drying skin out.
    Personally I don't like coconut oil -shea butter, flaxseed oil and
    olive oil are beneficial, but as far as coconut oil goes, I would'nt
    believe it has any benefit other then being a very cheap way for
    companies to make money off the uninformed consumer.
     
  4. jaym1212

    jaym1212 Guest

    > Those with lactose intolerance often use it [coconut oil]
    > along with virgin olive oil to replace butter.


    Butter doesn't have any significant amount of lactose, does it?

    > it [coconut oil] smokes easily...


    www.cookingforengineers.com/article.php?id=50 lists smoke points of
    various oils.

    > It's main benefit is that it is lower in arachidonic acid (AA) than olive oil.


    Vegetable oils (whether coconut, olives or other) have no AA; however,
    oils high in omega-6 vs omega-3 can lead the body to overproduce AA.

    >> Most of what I've been hearing about it [coconut oil] over the years is negative!


    20 to 40% of fat in many baby formulas comes from coconut oil
    (askdrsears.com/html/0/T000100.asp#T031002) mainly for its palmitic
    acid which is also a component of human breast milk.
     
  5. Stuart wrote:

    > Those with lactose intolerance often use it along with virgin olive oil to
    > replace butter.


    Anyone interested in a NORMAL diet for NORMAL people?
    --
    John Gohde,
    Achieving good Nutrition is an Art, NOT a Science!

    The nutrition of eating a healthy diet is a biological factor of the
    mind-body connection. Now, weighing in at 18 web pages, the
    Nutrition of a Healthy Diet is with more documentation and
    sharper terminology than ever before.
    http://naturalhealthperspective.com/food/
     
  6. Knack

    Knack Guest

    There are a number of subtypes of saturated fat. One of them is myristic
    acid, which is found in coconut oil. Myristic acid consumption elevates
    blood serum cholesterol the most. Does anyone out there know how coconut oil
    compares to lard with respect to myristic acid?


    "Stuart" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Those with lactose intolerance often use it along with virgin olive oil to
    > replace butter. It is better in a vegetable stir fry than olive oil, but
    > it has a very low flash point. Be careful you keep the heat low so you
    > don't oxidize it too much (it smokes easily) or start a fire. It's main
    > benefit is that it is lower in arachidonic acid (AA) than olive oil. AA
    > induces an inflammatory reaction in some people's guts causing problems.
    > Many people think it tastes better than olive oil in cooking. I haven't
    > seen any research of value on the coconut oil. It's more on avoiding AA.
    > Stuart//
    > "Rob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> >From time to time I have seen references in posts in this ng on coconut

    >> oil. Are the health claims true and what research is available to
    >> support the claims. Most of what I've been hearing about it over the
    >> years is negative! A store in my area sells certified organic, expeller
    >> pressed and free of solvents and additives. What's the real scoop on
    >> coconut oil?
    >>
    >> Thanks.
    >>
    >> Rob
    >>

    >
    >
     
  7. jaym1212

    jaym1212 Guest

    > Myristic acid consumption elevates blood serum cholesterol the most.

    See PubMed article# 219681 "Studies on the quality of breast milk
    during 23 months of lactation in a rural community of the Ivory Coast".
    Myristic acid is small but normal part of breast milk of many species
    including humans.

    See PubMed article# 15294485 "Dietary fat quality: a nutritional
    epidemiologist's view" which says "Among the cholesterol-raising SFA,
    myristic acid appears to be more potent than lauric acid or palmitic
    acid, but the data are not entirely consistent."

    See PubMed article# 15936650 "Moderate intake of myristic acid in sn-2
    position has beneficial lipidic effects and enhances DHA of cholesteryl
    esters in an interventional study"

    See www.westonaprice.org/knowyourfats/coconut_oil.html for favorable
    remarks about myristic acid.
     
  8. Knack

    Knack Guest

    AA is an n-6 PUFA that is found mostly in the following cooking oils
    (in decending order): safflower, grape seed, sunflower, corn, soybean,
    sesame, peanut, canola, almond. Although olive oil may possibly contain more
    AA
    than coconut oil, it is not regarded as a significant source of
    AA. In fact, AA is so low in olive oil that it is usually not included in an
    assay.

    "Stuart" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Those with lactose intolerance often use it along with virgin olive oil to
    > replace butter. It is better in a vegetable stir fry than olive oil, but
    > it has a very low flash point. Be careful you keep the heat low so you
    > don't oxidize it too much (it smokes easily) or start a fire. It's main
    > benefit is that it is lower in arachidonic acid (AA) than olive oil. AA
    > induces an inflammatory reaction in some people's guts causing problems.
    > Many people think it tastes better than olive oil in cooking. I haven't
    > seen any research of value on the coconut oil. It's more on avoiding AA.
    > Stuart//
    > "Rob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> >From time to time I have seen references in posts in this ng on coconut

    >> oil. Are the health claims true and what research is available to
    >> support the claims. Most of what I've been hearing about it over the
    >> years is negative! A store in my area sells certified organic, expeller
    >> pressed and free of solvents and additives. What's the real scoop on
    >> coconut oil?
    >>
    >> Thanks.
    >>
    >> Rob
    >>

    >
    >
     
  9. "Mr-Natural-Health" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Stuart wrote:
    >
    >> Those with lactose intolerance often use it along with virgin olive oil to
    >> replace butter.

    >
    > Anyone interested in a NORMAL diet for NORMAL people?


    NORMAL diet would do fine.

    NORMAL people? Well, you pays your money and you gets your chances!

    Chypho...
     
  10. Juhana Harju

    Juhana Harju Guest

    Knack wrote:

    : AA is an n-6 PUFA that is found mostly in the following cooking oils
    : (in decending order): safflower, grape seed, sunflower, corn,
    : soybean, sesame, peanut, canola, almond.

    That is not correct, you mix things up. Arachidonic acid (AA; 20:4) is an
    utterly different fatty acid than linoleic acid (18:2) high in many
    vegetable oils you mentioned. AA is actually highest in animal products and
    lowest in vegetable products. Probably your source of confusion is the fact
    that AA can also be synthesized from linoleic acid in the body. As AA is a
    precursor of prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and related compounds, which have
    important roles in inflammation and in the regulation of immunity, it is
    reasonable to set a limit to the intake of linoleic acid in order to control
    inflammation.

    Foods highest in AA - notice: no vegetable oils among these:
    http://www.nutritiondata.com/foods-000064000000000000000.html

    --
    Juhana
     
  11. montygram

    montygram Guest

    Do a google search for ray peat coconut and I think you will discover
    more information than you expected. One point to make here is that if
    you replace a substance like the typical refined corn, soy, or
    safflower oil with an oil like coconut, you will be subjecting yourself
    to far less damage from lipid peroxidation, so it's not necessarily
    that a young and healthy adult, for example, needs the particular fatty
    acids in coconut oil, but rather that you will be avoiding the free
    radical damage that comes from consuming the oils that you are
    subsituting with the coconut oil. A similar oil is palm kernel.
     
  12. Max C.

    Max C. Guest

    This is turning out to be a surprisingly informative thread. Thanks
    for that info, Jay.

    Max.
     
  13. Max C. wrote:
    > This is turning out to be a surprisingly informative thread. Thanks
    > for that info, Jay.


    Nah! Not really.

    But, I think I will try to buy a bottle of coconut oil at our local
    health food grocery store, and see first hand just hard it is to buy
    and use this crap.

    Just thought that you might want to know that you can use coconut oil,
    without being a kook about it. I hear it is great for softening old
    leather belts and shoes.
     
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