Coeliac friendly restuarants?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Al, Feb 8, 2004.

  1. Al

    Al Guest

    I've been looking for some time to find Coeliac friendly (ie. strictly gluten-free) restaurants
    in the UK with no success. No matter what I Google for I just find medical info on it and the
    odd recipe.

    My mother in law suffers from it and the only restaurant we can bring her to at the moment when she
    visits is a Harvester, as they have a gluten-free menu (and nut-free) to compliment their normal
    menu. Surely some other restaurants must do the same? I'm getting a little bored with going to the
    same place all the time when they visit!!

    In particular, does anyone know of any Oriental restaurants that cater for Coeliacs? I found one
    once in Dublin and it was great. Very hard to explain though if they don't know what you're on about
    - it's really best if they're used to dealing with Coeliacs as even the most innocent of things can
    cause problems (contaminated work surfaces or oil, soy sauce, etc.).

    a
     
    Tags:


  2. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On Sun, 8 Feb 2004 12:03:14 -0000, "al" <{ask_me}@blueyonder.co.uk>
    wrote:

    >I've been looking for some time to find Coeliac friendly (ie. strictly gluten-free) restaurants
    >in the UK with no success. No matter what I Google for I just find medical info on it and the
    >odd recipe.

    Interesting that you found an Oriental restaurant that caters to a coeliac diet, although the
    condition does seem to be more common on the west coast of Ireland.

    A search on

    "gluten free" restaurant uk

    produced a number of hits, incl.

    http://www.wheat-free.org/out.html

    Sometimes you have to ask Google different questions. :)
     
  3. Al

    Al Guest

    "Frogleg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > A search on
    >
    > "gluten free" restaurant uk
    >
    > produced a number of hits, incl.
    >
    > http://www.wheat-free.org/out.html
    >
    > Sometimes you have to ask Google different questions. :)

    Thanks for the link - I had actually found that one before. Unfortunately, when you look at it, it
    really doesn't have any content at all. John Lewis and "Neals Yard" are the only restaurants
    anywhere near. The former is a overpriced cafe and the latter is a cheese shop from what I can see!

    Back to square one ... still can't find anything at all gluten free around the London area :(

    a
     
  4. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "al" <{ask_me}@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:

    > "Frogleg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > A search on
    > >
    > > "gluten free" restaurant uk
    > >
    > > produced a number of hits, incl.
    > >
    > > http://www.wheat-free.org/out.html
    > >
    > > Sometimes you have to ask Google different questions. :)
    >
    > Thanks for the link - I had actually found that one before. Unfortunately, when you look at
    > it, it really doesn't have any content at all. John Lewis and "Neals Yard" are the only
    > restaurants anywhere near. The former is a overpriced cafe and the latter is a cheese shop
    > from what I can see!
    >
    > Back to square one ... still can't find anything at all gluten free around the London area :(
    >
    >
    >
    > a
    >
    >

    Geez.

    Just eat at anyplace, and order wheat free food.

    How hard can it be????

    K (in the same boat)

    --
    Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

    >,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<[email protected]>,,<
    http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems&include=0&userid=katra
     
  5. Al

    Al Guest

    "Katra" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:KatraMungBean-
    > Geez.
    >
    > Just eat at anyplace, and order wheat free food.
    >
    > How hard can it be????
    >
    > K (in the same boat)
    >

    It can be extremely hard. Most waiters have no idea what you're talking about and you rely on the
    chef to know what he/she is doing and advise them correctly. It's the difference between being able
    to book a restaurant that she can know there is plenty for her to eat in or the utter uncertainty of
    wondering if there's anything at all you can eat (that you like). This would be especially true in
    Far Eastern restaurants.

    I can believe you'd make such a comment being in the same boat ...

    a
     
  6. T E

    T E Guest

    From: {ask_me}@blueyonder.co.uk (al) I've been looking for some time to find Coeliac friendly (ie.
    strictly gluten-free) restaurants in the UK with no success. No matter what I Google for I just find
    medical info on it and the odd recipe. My mother in law suffers from it and the only restaurant we
    can bring her to at the moment when she visits is a Harvester, as they have a gluten-free menu (and
    nut-free) to compliment their normal menu. Surely some other restaurants must do the same? I'm
    getting a little bored with going to the same place all the time when they visit!! In particular,
    does anyone know of any Oriental restaurants that cater for Coeliacs? I found one once in Dublin and
    it was great. Very hard to explain though if they don't know what you're on about - it's really best
    if they're used to dealing with Coeliacs as even the most innocent of things can cause problems
    (contaminated work surfaces or oil, soy sauce, etc.).
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    --------------------------
    I know myself being a diabetic and trying to stay legal eating out in casual restaurants is not
    always easy either even with the nation wide chains. Couple of times I have gotten ill afterwards
    having a dish with hidden sugar content, and yes, I did ask the waitress before hand both times if
    sugar was a ingredient. The Atkins diet is being served even at the coney island restaurants here in
    Michigan, I know too many business owners who main interest is more profit for them through these
    fad diets than actually being certain their meals follow the guidelines being requested. Good luck
    with your search.
     
  7. No One

    No One Guest

    A comment from the US -- Extremely hard! Celiac's not only have to be concerned about wheat but
    wheat, barley, rye and oats (mainly a contamination problem). Additionally, food cooked in utinsils
    that have had gluten products cooked in them also are unsafe (IE baking utinsils where there is
    debris baked onto the pans, iron wear where there is gluten cooked onto the utinsil) it all leaches
    out into the food that's being cooked.

    How hard is it? I was in the hospital in Aug. and went without food for 60 hours because the
    hospital could not supply a gluten free diet and until I instructed them on how to do it. I had to
    call a friend to go to the supermarket and pick me up some rice cakes and some coldcuts from a brand
    I know is GF.

    2 years prior, the same thing is a hospital. I said, gluten free. They said, What is that? The
    doctor sent back 3 meals because they were not gluten free. Again, I had to call up someone to
    bring me food.

    I watched as I had Chinese dish prepared to my specifications -- no soy because it contains wheat.
    They did. Except they were also cooking someone elses meal, dipped a dipper into the soy and dropped
    droplets all over mine moving it to the other meal.

    In a restaurant, they automatically put on croutons after I specifically said no gluten, no bread
    etc. It came with croutons. I said I can't eat that. They simply went over to the counter and I
    watched them take out the croutons!

    Hard -- yes extremely hard.

    BTW, I had no symptoms from gluten. I just stopped absorbing my prescription drugs and had become
    lactose intolerant. It took 18-months on a GF diet for the lactose intolerance to clear up. I can't
    take the chance of someone contaminating my food -- my life depends on having a non-destroyed small
    intestine in order to absorb the required medications.

    > Geez.
    >
    > Just eat at anyplace, and order wheat free food.
    >
    > How hard can it be????
    >
    > K (in the same boat)
     
  8. Miche

    Miche Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Katra <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Geez.
    >
    > Just eat at anyplace, and order wheat free food.
    >
    > How hard can it be????
    >
    > K (in the same boat)

    Pretty hard. Wheat hides.

    Most soy sauce has wheat in it, for example.

    Miche (also in the same boat)

    --
    If you want to end war and stuff you got to sing loud. -- Arlo Guthrie, "Alice's Restaurant"
     
  9. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "al" <{ask_me}@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:

    > "Katra" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:KatraMungBean-
    > > Geez.
    > >
    > > Just eat at anyplace, and order wheat free food.
    > >
    > > How hard can it be????
    > >
    > > K (in the same boat)
    > >
    >
    > It can be extremely hard. Most waiters have no idea what you're talking about and you rely on the
    > chef to know what he/she is doing and advise them correctly. It's the difference between being
    > able to book a restaurant that she can know there is plenty for her to eat in or the utter
    > uncertainty of wondering if there's anything at all you can eat (that you like). This would be
    > especially true in Far Eastern restaurants.
    >
    > I can believe you'd make such a comment being in the same boat ...
    >
    >
    >
    > a
    >
    >

    Yes,

    You CAN believe it because I'm not a coward and know what to request at an eating establishment. :)

    Special requirements are just that, and MOST chefs don't want their food to be put down the garbage
    disposal because the customer was unable to consume them! They have more pride than that. :)

    Just put your foot down. Silly. ;-D And don't be afraid to let them know about your handicap... It's
    more common than you think.

    When I did some studying on wheat intolerance, it turns out that 20%, or one in every 5 people,
    are intolerant to wheat protiens!!! It's ever so common and it is yours (and my) job to
    eductate people...

    K.

    --
    Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

    >,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<[email protected]>,,<
    http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems&include=0&userid=katra
     
  10. stan

    stan Guest

    al <{ask_me}@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:

    > It can be extremely hard. Most waiters have no idea what you're talking about and you rely on the
    > chef to know what he/she is doing and advise them correctly. It's the difference between being
    > able to book a restaurant that she can know there is plenty for her to eat in or the utter
    > uncertainty of wondering if there's anything at all you can eat (that you like). This would be
    > especially true in Far Eastern restaurants.

    Maybe I am missing something, but isn't something like a salad with Russian dressing (or a
    vinigarette), steak (or chicken, or seafood), with a potato and a green vegetable wheat free?
     
  11. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] wrote:

    > al <{ask_me}@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:
    >
    > > It can be extremely hard. Most waiters have no idea what you're talking about and you rely on
    > > the chef to know what he/she is doing and advise them correctly. It's the difference between
    > > being able to book a restaurant that she can know there is plenty for her to eat in or the utter
    > > uncertainty of wondering if there's anything at all you can eat (that you like). This would be
    > > especially true in Far Eastern restaurants.
    >
    > Maybe I am missing something, but isn't something like a salad with Russian dressing (or a
    > vinigarette), steak (or chicken, or seafood), with a potato and a green vegetable wheat free?
    >

    Yes, but most wheat allergic people also cannot handle potatoes. ;-)

    I know my allergies, so ask for custom requests accordingly...

    It's never been a problem, especially with more cooks being familiar with Atkins dieting. That makes
    it even easier...

    When I was in Miami a couple of weeks ago at that 4 star hotel, the chef was delighted to do a
    custom order for me. I had grilled shrimp with asparagus and they were happy to substitute grilled
    squash in place of spuds for me.

    It was wunnerful. ;-) And Beckman Coulter was paying! They also paid for the $300.00 per night
    hotel room. <G>

    K.

    --
    Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

    >,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<[email protected]>,,<
    http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems&include=0&userid=katra
     
  12. Al

    Al Guest

    "Katra" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:KatraMungBean-> Yes,
    >
    > You CAN believe it because I'm not a coward and know what to request at an eating
    > establishment. :)
    >
    Yeah, but it's not a matter of that. It's not me who has the problem (thank God .... I love eating
    all the different types of food I can lay my hands on!!), it's the mother in law.

    > Special requirements are just that, and MOST chefs don't want their food to be put down the
    > garbage disposal because the customer was unable to consume them! They have more pride than
    > that. :)
    >
    We're not talking about eating in Park Lane hotels here, just normal restaurants. It would be nice
    after walking around London city all day to know of a few restaurants that were guaranteed to know
    what they're talking about on such matters.

    > Just put your foot down. Silly. ;-D And don't be afraid to let them know about your handicap...
    > It's more common than you think.

    I'm sure it is - however most people have never heard of it and those that have know little about it
    I've found!

    >
    > When I did some studying on wheat intolerance, it turns out that 20%, or one in every 5 people,
    > are intolerant to wheat protiens!!! It's ever so common and it is yours (and my) job to eductate
    > people...
    >

    Some more than others and yes, people should know. However inviting the mother in law for dinner in
    a restaurant she doesn't know when she has to go through the uncertainty and worry that the chef
    will know what they're doing (not to mention whether there was much in the way of choice in the
    first place) or regret it for days after is stressful. As they're only over for
    2/3 days a couple of times a year, it would be good to have places where she will know this
    won't happen.

    a
     
  13. Al

    Al Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Maybe I am missing something, but isn't something like a salad with Russian dressing (or a
    > vinigarette), steak (or chicken, or seafood), with a potato and a green vegetable wheat free?
    >

    Yes, if it's just like that. You'd be surprised to learn how often something is added to a dish
    though. Sauces are usually a no-no. Deep-frying always a problem (contamination). Grilled on the
    same surface as things like bread or breaded meats.

    Basically no matter what you order it can be a problem unless the chef knows that it must be kept
    away from gluten sources. I myself fell victim some years back by making a nice stir fry and just
    before it was ready I reckoned a splash of soy would bring out the flavour better ... had to go in
    the bin then!! :(

    a
     
  14. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "al" <{ask_me}@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:

    >
    > Some more than others and yes, people should know. However inviting the mother in law for dinner
    > in a restaurant she doesn't know when she has to go through the uncertainty and worry that the
    > chef will know what they're doing (not to mention whether there was much in the way of choice in
    > the first place) or regret it for days after is stressful. As they're only over for
    > 2/3 days a couple of times a year, it would be good to have places where she will know this won't
    > happen.
    >

    I understand.... really I do. Let us hope that SHE knows what she can and cannot eat?

    I'd make some phone calls if I were you. Call around to different places and see if they
    understand. :)

    If they don't understad Coeliac disease, you can bet by now they understand "Atkins" and that will
    solve your problem. Trust me. <G>

    Atkins diet is most freindly to Coeliac disorder (and IBS too for that matter!).

    K.

    --
    Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

    >,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katra at centurytel dot net>,,<
    http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems&include=0&userid=katra
     
  15. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]ary.blueyonder.co.uk>,
    "al" <{ask_me}@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:

    > <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Maybe I am missing something, but isn't something like a salad with Russian dressing (or a
    > > vinigarette), steak (or chicken, or seafood), with a potato and a green vegetable wheat free?
    > >
    >
    > Yes, if it's just like that. You'd be surprised to learn how often something is added to a dish
    > though. Sauces are usually a no-no. Deep-frying always a problem (contamination). Grilled on the
    > same surface as things like bread or breaded meats.

    Lots of folks don't understand Coeliac disease... The wheat intolerance is pretty total. Most, if
    not all, gravies and sauces are made with flour, and any breaded item is OUT. A lot of salad
    dressings also have flour as a thickener. Breaded chicken and seafood, same thing.

    >
    > Basically no matter what you order it can be a problem unless the chef knows that it must be kept
    > away from gluten sources. I myself fell victim some years back by making a nice stir fry and just
    > before it was ready I reckoned a splash of soy would bring out the flavour better ... had to go in
    > the bin then!! :(

    You are sensitive to soy? Interesting. I must watch that. So far, so good tho'.

    --
    Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

    >,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katra at centurytel dot net>,,<
    http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems&include=0&userid=katra
     
  16. K. Reece

    K. Reece Guest

    "al" <{ask_me}@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > We're not talking about eating in Park Lane hotels here, just normal restaurants. It would be nice
    > after walking around London city all day to know of a few restaurants that were guaranteed to know
    > what they're
    talking
    > about on such matters.

    > I'm sure it is - however most people have never heard of it and those that have know little about
    > it I've found!

    >
    > a

    If most people have never heard of it why would you expect to find a restaurant that caters to it or
    even knows about it?

    Kathy
     
  17. Miche

    Miche Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Katra <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] wrote:

    > > Maybe I am missing something, but isn't something like a salad with Russian dressing (or a
    > > vinigarette), steak (or chicken, or seafood), with a potato and a green vegetable wheat free?
    > >
    >
    > Yes, but most wheat allergic people also cannot handle potatoes. ;-)

    Are you serious or joking?

    Miche

    --
    If you want to end war and stuff you got to sing loud. -- Arlo Guthrie, "Alice's Restaurant"
     
  18. Al

    Al Guest

    "Katra" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:KatraMungBean-
    > You are sensitive to soy? Interesting. I must watch that. So far, so good tho'.
    >

    Like I said, she is ... if it were me, I'd be devastated!! I use soy A LOT ;)

    a
     
  19. Al

    Al Guest

    "K. Reece" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > If most people have never heard of it why would you expect to find a restaurant that caters to it
    > or even knows about it?
    >
    > Kathy
    >

    Well if the Harvester chain have and a Chinese in Dublin, then there must be quite a few more. At
    the very least (and often is the case), restaurateur's who's family has been touched by it are
    likely to be sensitive to it. And when I say it's not very well known about - I don't mean it's
    virtually unheard of!!

    Anyway .. back to my original question - I was just wondering if like minded people could point out
    some good places they'd been to in the London area. There must be a few of you out there!!

    a
     
  20. Zxcvbob

    Zxcvbob Guest

    Katra wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, "al"
    > <{ask_me}@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:
    >
    >
    >><[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >>
    >>>Maybe I am missing something, but isn't something like a salad with Russian dressing (or a
    >>>vinigarette), steak (or chicken, or seafood), with a potato and a green vegetable wheat free?
    >>>
    >>
    >>Yes, if it's just like that. You'd be surprised to learn how often something is added to a dish
    >>though. Sauces are usually a no-no. Deep-frying always a problem (contamination). Grilled on the
    >>same surface as things like bread or breaded meats.
    >
    >
    > Lots of folks don't understand Coeliac disease... The wheat intolerance is pretty total. Most, if
    > not all, gravies and sauces are made with flour, and any breaded item is OUT. A lot of salad
    > dressings also have flour as a thickener. Breaded chicken and seafood, same thing.
    >
    >
    >>Basically no matter what you order it can be a problem unless the chef knows that it must be kept
    >>away from gluten sources. I myself fell victim some years back by making a nice stir fry and just
    >>before it was ready I reckoned a splash of soy would bring out the flavour better ... had to go in
    >>the bin then!! :(
    >
    >
    > You are sensitive to soy? Interesting. I must watch that. So far, so good tho'.

    A lot of soy sauces have wheat in them; I'm not sure if it's malted or fermented or what.

    Bob
     
Loading...