Coffee drinks...

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Carol In WI, Mar 26, 2005.

  1. Carol In WI

    Carol In WI Guest

    I've come across recipes to make your own cappacino's, etc, but they taste
    cheap, I'd like to be able to come closer to the stuff you buy in the
    stores. Any suggestions? Thanks, Carol In WI
     
    Tags:


  2. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Carol In WI wrote:
    > I've come across recipes to make your own cappacino's, etc, but they

    taste
    > cheap, I'd like to be able to come closer to the stuff you buy in the


    > stores. Any suggestions? Thanks, Carol In WI


    http://www.manhattanspecial.com/movie.html

    Sheldon
     
  3. JimLane

    JimLane Guest

    Carol In WI wrote:
    > I've come across recipes to make your own cappacino's, etc, but they taste
    > cheap, I'd like to be able to come closer to the stuff you buy in the
    > stores. Any suggestions? Thanks, Carol In WI
    >
    >


    alt.coffee


    jim
     
  4. Far as I can tell, someone wrote:
    > I'd like to be able to come closer to the stuff you buy in the stores.


    Which stores? Tom Thumb? 7-11?
    You can prolly buy it at the supermarket in a box.

    A real cappuccino from a real coffee shop? Well...

    Making cappuccino is not a recipe. It requires freshly properly roasted, properly
    ground quality coffee beans. The beans have to be ground with a controllable burr
    grinder to a size whereby the full flavor can be extracted from the coffee grounds,
    an espresso maker capable of forcing hot water through the grounds under pressure and
    the ability to steam milk into a froth.

    A cappuccino is made by first making espresso. Then adding frothed (steamed) milk.
    There is NO other way.

    So the truth is... and I know this because I own a coffee bar and have been making
    coffee drinks for lots of years. In order to make a cappuccino at home, you have to
    spend a lot of money and practive for a lot of time to get it right.

    Yes, there are shortcuts, but they ALWAYS make for worse coffee.

    Go to alt.coffee and read for a few days. After a few days, if you are still
    interested, aska few questions. They are experts. REAL experts. You will soon see
    that making a cap is no easy task, but you can do it if you really really want to.
     
  5. Ruddell

    Ruddell Guest

    In <[email protected]> Sheldon wrote:
    >
    > Carol In WI wrote:
    >> I've come across recipes to make your own cappacino's, etc, but they

    > taste
    >> cheap, I'd like to be able to come closer to the stuff you buy in the

    >
    >> stores. Any suggestions? Thanks, Carol In WI

    >
    > http://www.manhattanspecial.com/movie.html



    Well I'll be darned. Amazing...is it good or just cool?


    --
    Cheers

    Dennis

    Remove 'Elle-Kabong' to reply
     
  6. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Petey the Wonder Dog wrote:

    > A cappuccino is made by first making espresso. Then adding frothed
    > (steamed) milk. There is NO other way.


    I think you've got the order backwards there: If you make the espresso
    first, it will cool significantly while you're making the frothed milk. By
    comparison, the milk will cool much less, and it takes a very short time to
    make the espresso in any case.


    > Go to alt.coffee and read for a few days. After a few days, if you are
    > still interested, aska few questions. They are experts. REAL experts.
    > You will soon see that making a cap is no easy task, but you can do it if
    > you really really want to.


    I agree with the alt.coffee recommendation, but I don't think it's all that
    hard to make a good cappuccino. It's a matter of technique in each of the
    steps, and no single step is difficult.

    Bob
     
  7. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    Ruddell wrote:
    > In <[email protected]m> Sheldon
    > wrote:
    >>
    >> Carol In WI wrote:
    >>> I've come across recipes to make your own cappacino's, etc, but
    >>> they taste cheap, I'd like to be able to come closer to the stuff
    >>> you buy in the

    >>
    >>> stores. Any suggestions? Thanks, Carol In WI

    >>
    >> http://www.manhattanspecial.com/movie.html

    >
    >
    > Well I'll be darned. Amazing...is it good or just cool?


    I don't think they knew what "cool" was 100 years ago. Except maybe for a
    chilled coffee drink ;)

    Jill
     
  8. On Sat 26 Mar 2005 10:40:19p, jmcquown wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > Ruddell wrote:
    >> In <[email protected]> Sheldon
    >> wrote:
    >>>
    >>> Carol In WI wrote:
    >>>> I've come across recipes to make your own cappacino's, etc, but
    >>>> they taste cheap, I'd like to be able to come closer to the stuff
    >>>> you buy in the
    >>>
    >>>> stores. Any suggestions? Thanks, Carol In WI
    >>>
    >>> http://www.manhattanspecial.com/movie.html

    >>
    >>
    >> Well I'll be darned. Amazing...is it good or just cool?

    >
    > I don't think they knew what "cool" was 100 years ago. Except maybe for
    > a chilled coffee drink ;)
    >
    > Jill


    Chilled coffee drinks probably were too common then, either.



    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    ____________________________________________

    Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
     
  9. JimLane

    JimLane Guest

    Bob wrote:
    > Petey the Wonder Dog wrote:
    >
    >
    >>A cappuccino is made by first making espresso. Then adding frothed
    >>(steamed) milk. There is NO other way.

    >
    >
    > I think you've got the order backwards there: If you make the espresso
    > first, it will cool significantly while you're making the frothed milk. By
    > comparison, the milk will cool much less, and it takes a very short time to
    > make the espresso in any case.


    Oh, so your machine can only do one thing at a time and you presume that
    everyone else has such limited equipment? Sorry! Most of us can them
    simultaneously.


    jim
     
  10. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > On Sat 26 Mar 2005 10:40:19p, jmcquown wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >
    >> Ruddell wrote:
    >>> In <[email protected]> Sheldon
    >>> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>> Carol In WI wrote:
    >>>>> I've come across recipes to make your own cappacino's, etc, but
    >>>>> they taste cheap, I'd like to be able to come closer to the stuff
    >>>>> you buy in the
    >>>>
    >>>>> stores. Any suggestions? Thanks, Carol In WI
    >>>>
    >>>> http://www.manhattanspecial.com/movie.html
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Well I'll be darned. Amazing...is it good or just cool?

    >>
    >> I don't think they knew what "cool" was 100 years ago. Except maybe
    >> for a chilled coffee drink ;)
    >>
    >> Jill

    >
    > Chilled coffee drinks probably were too common then, either.


    True. Ice had to be hauled up the river packed in sawdust. Room temp, more
    like.

    Jill
     
  11. On Sat 26 Mar 2005 11:33:09p, jmcquown wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >> On Sat 26 Mar 2005 10:40:19p, jmcquown wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >>
    >>> Ruddell wrote:
    >>>> In <[email protected]> Sheldon
    >>>> wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Carol In WI wrote:
    >>>>>> I've come across recipes to make your own cappacino's, etc, but
    >>>>>> they taste cheap, I'd like to be able to come closer to the stuff
    >>>>>> you buy in the
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> stores. Any suggestions? Thanks, Carol In WI
    >>>>>
    >>>>> http://www.manhattanspecial.com/movie.html
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Well I'll be darned. Amazing...is it good or just cool?
    >>>
    >>> I don't think they knew what "cool" was 100 years ago. Except maybe
    >>> for a chilled coffee drink ;)
    >>>
    >>> Jill

    >>
    >> Chilled coffee drinks probably were too common then, either.

    >
    > True. Ice had to be hauled up the river packed in sawdust. Room temp,
    > more like.
    >
    > Jill


    I know my grandmother in MS had an ice box before 1910, but I doubt they
    chipped away at the block of ice for beverages. It was much important to
    keep the cream and milk cool.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    ____________________________________________

    Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
     
  12. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > On Sat 26 Mar 2005 11:33:09p, jmcquown wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >
    >> Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >>> On Sat 26 Mar 2005 10:40:19p, jmcquown wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >>>
    >>>> Ruddell wrote:
    >>>>> In <[email protected]> Sheldon
    >>>>> wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Carol In WI wrote:
    >>>>>>> I've come across recipes to make your own cappacino's, etc, but
    >>>>>>> they taste cheap, I'd like to be able to come closer to the
    >>>>>>> stuff you buy in the
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> stores. Any suggestions? Thanks, Carol In WI
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> http://www.manhattanspecial.com/movie.html
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Well I'll be darned. Amazing...is it good or just cool?
    >>>>
    >>>> I don't think they knew what "cool" was 100 years ago. Except
    >>>> maybe for a chilled coffee drink ;)
    >>>>
    >>>> Jill
    >>>
    >>> Chilled coffee drinks probably were too common then, either.

    >>
    >> True. Ice had to be hauled up the river packed in sawdust. Room
    >> temp, more like.
    >>
    >> Jill

    >
    > I know my grandmother in MS had an ice box before 1910, but I doubt
    > they chipped away at the block of ice for beverages. It was much
    > important to keep the cream and milk cool.


    True, Wayne. Every time I think about someone chopping at a block of ice
    with an ice pick I think of an early Nichole Kidman film - Dead Calm. Chip
    at the ice to make lemonade and add something to knock out the madman -
    Billy Zane. Eeek!

    I don't frequent those coffee house places but that Starbuck's bottled
    Frappuchino is pretty good for a quick cold on-the-run coffee thing.

    Jill
     
  13. -L.

    -L. Guest

    Carol In WI wrote:
    > I've come across recipes to make your own cappacino's, etc, but they

    taste
    > cheap, I'd like to be able to come closer to the stuff you buy in the


    > stores. Any suggestions? Thanks, Carol In WI


    Buy an espresso/cappuccino machine?

    -L.
     
  14. On Sat 26 Mar 2005 11:49:46p, jmcquown wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >> On Sat 26 Mar 2005 11:33:09p, jmcquown wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >>
    >>> Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >>>> On Sat 26 Mar 2005 10:40:19p, jmcquown wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Ruddell wrote:
    >>>>>> In <[email protected]> Sheldon
    >>>>>> wrote:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Carol In WI wrote:
    >>>>>>>> I've come across recipes to make your own cappacino's, etc, but
    >>>>>>>> they taste cheap, I'd like to be able to come closer to the
    >>>>>>>> stuff you buy in the
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> stores. Any suggestions? Thanks, Carol In WI
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> http://www.manhattanspecial.com/movie.html
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Well I'll be darned. Amazing...is it good or just cool?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I don't think they knew what "cool" was 100 years ago. Except
    >>>>> maybe for a chilled coffee drink ;)
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Jill
    >>>>
    >>>> Chilled coffee drinks probably were too common then, either.
    >>>
    >>> True. Ice had to be hauled up the river packed in sawdust. Room
    >>> temp, more like.
    >>>
    >>> Jill

    >>
    >> I know my grandmother in MS had an ice box before 1910, but I doubt
    >> they chipped away at the block of ice for beverages. It was much
    >> important to keep the cream and milk cool.

    >
    > True, Wayne. Every time I think about someone chopping at a block of
    > ice with an ice pick I think of an early Nichole Kidman film - Dead
    > Calm. Chip at the ice to make lemonade and add something to knock out
    > the madman - Billy Zane. Eeek!


    I remember that flick! Creepy!

    > I don't frequent those coffee house places but that Starbuck's bottled
    > Frappuchino is pretty good for a quick cold on-the-run coffee thing.
    >
    > Jill


    For several years after moving to AZ I was stopping at a local coffeehouse
    each morning for an iced latté, that is, until I realized I was dropping
    over $20 a week on coffee! Now I brew double-strength French roast coffee
    a couple of times a week and keep it in the fridge. I mix a really large
    travel mug of coffee with fat-free half and half over ice. I'm just as
    happy with it.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    ____________________________________________

    Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
     
  15. Carol In WI wrote:
    > I've come across recipes to make your own cappacino's, etc, but they

    taste
    > cheap, I'd like to be able to come closer to the stuff you buy in the


    > stores. Any suggestions?


    What I do when I'm at home and want a coffee & hot milk drink is very
    simple. I have a bottle of prebrewed, ultra strong coffee (French
    roast, by Victorian). I put about 3-4 tbs in a cup, scald a cup of
    whole milk, and add the milk to the coffee...results in a foamless (or
    mini foam)latte, but has a good rich flavor.

    You could brew a double- or triple-strength coffee (French roast or an
    espresso roast)and store it in a covered container in the fridge.
    Whenever you wanted your favorite coffee drink just scald the amount of
    milk you want and add it to about 3 tbs of the coffee. You won't get
    much foam but the flavor and smoothness are excellent.

    There are inexpensive milk steamers available, costing under $15. I've
    never tried one, mostly because having a lot of foam doesn't impress
    me, but if you want to try for greater authenticity.....

    Mac


    Mac
     
  16. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Carol In WI wrote:
    >> I've come across recipes to make your own cappacino's, etc, but they

    > taste
    >> cheap, I'd like to be able to come closer to the stuff you buy in the

    >
    >> stores. Any suggestions?

    >
    > What I do when I'm at home and want a coffee & hot milk drink is very
    > simple. I have a bottle of prebrewed, ultra strong coffee (French
    > roast, by Victorian). I put about 3-4 tbs in a cup, scald a cup of
    > whole milk, and add the milk to the coffee...results in a foamless (or
    > mini foam)latte, but has a good rich flavor.
    >
    > You could brew a double- or triple-strength coffee (French roast or an
    > espresso roast)and store it in a covered container in the fridge.
    > Whenever you wanted your favorite coffee drink just scald the amount of
    > milk you want and add it to about 3 tbs of the coffee. You won't get
    > much foam but the flavor and smoothness are excellent.
    >
    > There are inexpensive milk steamers available, costing under $15. I've
    > never tried one, mostly because having a lot of foam doesn't impress
    > me, but if you want to try for greater authenticity.....
    >
    > Mac

    Years ago I had an expresso machine with a steamer, but it went by the
    wayside somewhere in many moves. Your idea makes sense to me; and as I have
    on hand from making a Tiramasu a couple of weeks ago a 250g can of
    "Authentic Italian Espresso Coffee" "Caffe Kimo" "Expresso Napoletano" I am
    going to make 4 cups of coffee using 12 scoops of coffee (triple what I
    usually use). I will use some of this for a cuppa now and store the rest in
    the refrigerator as you suggested; but do you think that I should make a
    total of 4 cups, or is that too much to store, depending if I have a couple
    of cups per day.
    Thanks.
    Awaiting your answer --
    smacking lips,
    Dee
     
  17. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >> On Sat 26 Mar 2005 11:33:09p, jmcquown wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >>
    >>> Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >>>> On Sat 26 Mar 2005 10:40:19p, jmcquown wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Ruddell wrote:
    >>>>>> In <[email protected]> Sheldon
    >>>>>> wrote:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Carol In WI wrote:
    >>>>>>>> I've come across recipes to make your own cappacino's, etc, but
    >>>>>>>> they taste cheap, I'd like to be able to come closer to the
    >>>>>>>> stuff you buy in the
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> stores. Any suggestions? Thanks, Carol In WI
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> http://www.manhattanspecial.com/movie.html
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Well I'll be darned. Amazing...is it good or just cool?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I don't think they knew what "cool" was 100 years ago. Except
    >>>>> maybe for a chilled coffee drink ;)
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Jill
    >>>>
    >>>> Chilled coffee drinks probably were too common then, either.
    >>>
    >>> True. Ice had to be hauled up the river packed in sawdust. Room
    >>> temp, more like.
    >>>
    >>> Jill

    >>
    >> I know my grandmother in MS had an ice box before 1910, but I doubt
    >> they chipped away at the block of ice for beverages. It was much
    >> important to keep the cream and milk cool.

    >
    > True, Wayne. Every time I think about someone chopping at a block of ice
    > with an ice pick I think of an early Nichole Kidman film - Dead Calm.
    > Chip
    > at the ice to make lemonade and add something to knock out the madman -
    > Billy Zane. Eeek!
    >
    > I don't frequent those coffee house places but that Starbuck's bottled
    > Frappuchino is pretty good for a quick cold on-the-run coffee thing.
    >
    > Jill
    >

    BJ's has them $1 (maybe $1.50???) off until April 9 with their coupon which
    you can pick up at the door.
    Dee
     
  18. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    Dee Randall wrote:
    > "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >>> On Sat 26 Mar 2005 11:33:09p, jmcquown wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >>>
    >>>> Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >>>>> On Sat 26 Mar 2005 10:40:19p, jmcquown wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> Ruddell wrote:
    >>>>>>> In <[email protected]>
    >>>>>>> Sheldon wrote:
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Carol In WI wrote:
    >>>>>>>>> I've come across recipes to make your own cappacino's, etc,
    >>>>>>>>> but they taste cheap, I'd like to be able to come closer to
    >>>>>>>>> the
    >>>>>>>>> stuff you buy in the
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> stores. Any suggestions? Thanks, Carol In WI
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> http://www.manhattanspecial.com/movie.html
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Well I'll be darned. Amazing...is it good or just cool?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> I don't think they knew what "cool" was 100 years ago. Except
    >>>>>> maybe for a chilled coffee drink ;)
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Jill
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Chilled coffee drinks probably were too common then, either.
    >>>>
    >>>> True. Ice had to be hauled up the river packed in sawdust. Room
    >>>> temp, more like.
    >>>>
    >>>> Jill
    >>>
    >>> I know my grandmother in MS had an ice box before 1910, but I doubt
    >>> they chipped away at the block of ice for beverages. It was much
    >>> important to keep the cream and milk cool.

    >>
    >> True, Wayne. Every time I think about someone chopping at a block
    >> of ice with an ice pick I think of an early Nichole Kidman film -
    >> Dead Calm. Chip
    >> at the ice to make lemonade and add something to knock out the
    >> madman - Billy Zane. Eeek!
    >>
    >> I don't frequent those coffee house places but that Starbuck's
    >> bottled Frappuchino is pretty good for a quick cold on-the-run
    >> coffee thing.
    >>
    >> Jill
    >>

    > BJ's has them $1 (maybe $1.50???) off until April 9 with their coupon
    > which you can pick up at the door.
    > Dee


    What the heck is BJ's (aside from the obvious, dear Sheldon!)?

    Jill
     
  19. Jean B.

    Jean B. Guest

    jmcquown wrote:

    > True, Wayne. Every time I think about someone chopping at a block of ice
    > with an ice pick I think of an early Nichole Kidman film - Dead Calm. Chip
    > at the ice to make lemonade and add something to knock out the madman -
    > Billy Zane. Eeek!
    >
    > I don't frequent those coffee house places but that Starbuck's bottled
    > Frappuchino is pretty good for a quick cold on-the-run coffee thing.
    >
    > Jill
    >
    >

    Those are excruciatingly sweet though.

    --
    Jean B.
     
  20. Jean B.

    Jean B. Guest

    Dee Randall wrote:

    > Years ago I had an expresso machine with a steamer, but it went by the
    > wayside somewhere in many moves. Your idea makes sense to me; and as I have
    > on hand from making a Tiramasu a couple of weeks ago a 250g can of
    > "Authentic Italian Espresso Coffee" "Caffe Kimo" "Expresso Napoletano" I am
    > going to make 4 cups of coffee using 12 scoops of coffee (triple what I
    > usually use). I will use some of this for a cuppa now and store the rest in
    > the refrigerator as you suggested; but do you think that I should make a
    > total of 4 cups, or is that too much to store, depending if I have a couple
    > of cups per day.
    > Thanks.
    > Awaiting your answer --
    > smacking lips,
    > Dee
    >

    I brew very strong coffee and store it in a glass bottle in the
    fridge, finishing the last of it ca 3 days later. It keeps
    perfectly well.



    --
    Jean B.
     
Loading...