Cold Coffee Maker

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Dee Randall, Sep 8, 2005.

  1. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

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  2. JimLane

    JimLane Guest

    Dee Randall wrote:
    > http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ISBN=B0000DCYS1/ref=nosim/jwalkassociateA/002-2072856-1218429
    >
    > Has anyone tried or know the advantages of this coffee maker?
    > Looks quite interesting to me.
    > Dee Dee
    >
    >



    Go over to alt.coffee where these have been discussed ad naseum. The
    only possible reason to use one is to lower the acidity to the lowest
    level possible. Their copy says that.

    If you want to do this, use a glass container and a large filter
    cone/melitta to filter the resulting liquid. Cost - a tenth of this. One
    pound of coffee, nine cups of water, overnight. Use the money saved to
    buy coffee from a local roaster and get better coffee yet.

    One very misleading statement made is about undesirable oils. Got news,
    its that oil that moves the flavor around. Not that store bought ground
    coffees have that much to begin with.


    jim
     
  3. Bubbabob

    Bubbabob Guest

  4. D.Currie

    D.Currie Guest

    "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ISBN=B0000DCYS1/ref=nosim/jwalkassociateA/002-2072856-1218429
    >
    > Has anyone tried or know the advantages of this coffee maker?
    > Looks quite interesting to me.
    > Dee Dee
    >
    >


    My parents had one of these -- the old ones, that is -- when I was a kid. I
    think they only used it once or twice, and I have no idea where they got it
    or why. They weren't they types to go for gadgets. Maybe someone gave it to
    them. As a kid, I was fascinated by it. Maybe it reminded me of some mad
    scientist experiment.

    So now I have the thing, and I think I used it once. I don't remember if the
    taste was any better or worse than regular coffee, but I must not have been
    overwhelmed if I didn't make another batch right away.

    The advantage I can see is if you regularly need odd amounts of coffee. Like
    if you normally need just one or two cups, but then you might have times
    when you need lots of coffee for entertaining, and you'd need several pots
    to serve everyone. And/or if everyone in the house wants different strengths
    of coffee. With the liquid stuff, you can make as much as you need, the
    strengths you need. I suppose it would be good for iced coffee, too, since
    it's already cold. Or if you tend to use coffee in recipes.

    Oddly enough, I can see that it might be useful for someone who doesn't use
    a lot of coffee and doesn't want a coffeemaker sitting around, but who
    doesn't want to serve instant coffee. So they could make a batch, freeze the
    stuff in ice cube trays, and be ready for coffee any time.
     
  5. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "D.Currie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]supernews.com...
    >> http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ISBN=B0000DCYS1/ref=nosim/jwalkassociateA/002-2072856-1218429
    >>
    >> Has anyone tried or know the advantages of this coffee maker?
    >> Looks quite interesting to me.
    >> Dee Dee
    >>
    >>

    >
    > My parents had one of these -- the old ones, that is -- when I was a kid.
    > I think they only used it once or twice, and I have no idea where they got
    > it or why. They weren't they types to go for gadgets. Maybe someone gave
    > it to them. As a kid, I was fascinated by it. Maybe it reminded me of some
    > mad scientist experiment.
    >
    > So now I have the thing, and I think I used it once. I don't remember if
    > the taste was any better or worse than regular coffee, but I must not have
    > been overwhelmed if I didn't make another batch right away.
    >
    > The advantage I can see is if you regularly need odd amounts of coffee.
    > Like if you normally need just one or two cups, but then you might have
    > times when you need lots of coffee for entertaining, and you'd need
    > several pots to serve everyone. And/or if everyone in the house wants
    > different strengths of coffee. With the liquid stuff, you can make as much
    > as you need, the strengths you need. I suppose it would be good for iced
    > coffee, too, since it's already cold. Or if you tend to use coffee in
    > recipes.
    >
    > Oddly enough, I can see that it might be useful for someone who doesn't
    > use a lot of coffee and doesn't want a coffeemaker sitting around, but who
    > doesn't want to serve instant coffee. So they could make a batch, freeze
    > the stuff in ice cube trays, and be ready for coffee any time.

    Thanks for your thoughtful response. I appreciate it.

    There are also some who have debated the safety of sun tea sit because of
    certain changes in tea after so many hours. It would be hard to know if the
    same applies to coffee used in this format. I bring this up because of
    these considerations, although I'm not soliciting comments for myself
    regarding this subject, as I know pretty much by now who bends which way on
    rfc in these types of dialogue.
    Thanks so much,
    Dee Dee
     
  6. JimLane

    JimLane Guest

    D.Currie wrote:
    > "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ISBN=B0000DCYS1/ref=nosim/jwalkassociateA/002-2072856-1218429
    >>
    >>Has anyone tried or know the advantages of this coffee maker?
    >>Looks quite interesting to me.
    >>Dee Dee
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    > My parents had one of these -- the old ones, that is -- when I was a kid. I
    > think they only used it once or twice, and I have no idea where they got it
    > or why. They weren't they types to go for gadgets. Maybe someone gave it to
    > them. As a kid, I was fascinated by it. Maybe it reminded me of some mad
    > scientist experiment.
    >
    > So now I have the thing, and I think I used it once. I don't remember if the
    > taste was any better or worse than regular coffee, but I must not have been
    > overwhelmed if I didn't make another batch right away.
    >
    > The advantage I can see is if you regularly need odd amounts of coffee. Like
    > if you normally need just one or two cups, but then you might have times
    > when you need lots of coffee for entertaining, and you'd need several pots
    > to serve everyone. And/or if everyone in the house wants different strengths
    > of coffee. With the liquid stuff, you can make as much as you need, the
    > strengths you need. I suppose it would be good for iced coffee, too, since
    > it's already cold. Or if you tend to use coffee in recipes.


    To handle people who want different strengths, keep an additional
    container with very hot water nearby. They can dilute to their taste.

    What aggravates me where there are coffee services, is the clown who
    makes a half-strength pot instead of pouring a half cup of regular
    strength and adding an equal amount of hot water from the water device
    standing right there. You end up throwing the remains of the pot out and
    have a bastard half dose of coffee grounds going to waste.


    jim
     
  7. sf

    sf Guest

    On Fri, 09 Sep 2005 17:42:11 -0700, JimLane wrote:

    > To handle people who want different strengths, keep an additional
    > container with very hot water nearby. They can dilute to their taste.


    Nodding head in agreement! I hate weak coffee, but if others want it
    weak, they should be proved with piping hot water to dilute it to
    their taste.
     
  8. Bubbabob

    Bubbabob Guest

    sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Fri, 09 Sep 2005 17:42:11 -0700, JimLane wrote:
    >
    >> To handle people who want different strengths, keep an additional
    >> container with very hot water nearby. They can dilute to their taste.

    >
    > Nodding head in agreement! I hate weak coffee, but if others want it
    > weak, they should be proved with piping hot water to dilute it to
    > their taste.
    >


    Strength isn't the problem. Most of the esters and oils that are a coffee's
    distinctive taste will not go into solution at room temperature and will
    remain in the grounds. Cold extraction only gets about 1/3 of the flavor
    components to the cup.
     
  9. JimLane

    JimLane Guest

    Bubbabob wrote:
    > sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>On Fri, 09 Sep 2005 17:42:11 -0700, JimLane wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> To handle people who want different strengths, keep an additional
    >>> container with very hot water nearby. They can dilute to their taste.

    >>
    >>Nodding head in agreement! I hate weak coffee, but if others want it
    >>weak, they should be proved with piping hot water to dilute it to
    >>their taste.
    >>

    >
    >
    > Strength isn't the problem. Most of the esters and oils that are a coffee's
    > distinctive taste will not go into solution at room temperature and will
    > remain in the grounds. Cold extraction only gets about 1/3 of the flavor
    > components to the cup.


    You are both wrong and right, bb.

    This subtopic is about how this cold coffee concentrate made it easier
    to get varying strengths in the cup for those who don't want it full
    strength. I showed it was just as easy with regular brewed full strength
    coffee by having hot water nearby.



    About the flavor components, you are bang on.
     
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