cold weather? How cold is it?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Max, Dec 8, 2004.

  1. Max

    Max Guest

    I've was quietly astonished to realize how warm it's been lately as i
    made my commute in the drizzly rain w/ just shorts and a light wind
    shell on top the last few days. I thought it got colder in december in
    chicago. huh.

    ..max

    --
    the part of <[email protected]>
    was played by maxwell monningh 8-p
     
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  2. Rich

    Rich Guest

    Max wrote:

    > I've was quietly astonished to realize how warm it's been lately as i
    > made my commute in the drizzly rain w/ just shorts and a light wind
    > shell on top the last few days. I thought it got colder in december in
    > chicago. huh.


    It's been unusually cold here Colorado along the front range (on the
    east edge of the mountains, not IN the mountains). Snow that fell a
    week ago is still on the ground, which is very unusual. Haven't been on
    a bike in a month or so.

    Rich
     
  3. Hunrobe

    Hunrobe Guest

    >Max [email protected]

    wrote:

    >I've was quietly astonished to realize how warm it's been lately as i
    >made my commute in the drizzly rain w/ just shorts and a light wind
    >shell on top the last few days. I thought it got colder in december in
    >chicago. huh.
    >
    >.max


    Stop tempting the weather gods.

    Regards,
    Bob Hunt
     
  4. In New Jersey, it never stops raining. I can't get any real outdoor
    riding in. I am glad I signed up for a spin class. I am too much of a
    novice to take a bike out in inclement weather. I fell over when it was
    a beautiful sunny day. I can't imagine what would happen if I rode in
    the rain. Plus at my age, I would take forever to heal if I broke
    something. But I will not give up. I will focus, ride, train and do
    my 25 mile ride for MS on my birthday. YES I WILL!!!!!

    Persistence is the twin sister of excellence. One is a matter of
    quality; the other, a matter of time.
    Marabel Morgan, The Electric Woman
     
  5. Rich wrote:
    > It's been unusually cold here Colorado along the front range (on the
    > east edge of the mountains, not IN the mountains). Snow that fell a


    > week ago is still on the ground, which is very unusual. Haven't been

    on
    > a bike in a month or so.


    I'm on the front range also, and the streets around my neighborhood
    still have wet ice on them (sigh). I've been spending my evenings on
    the trainer watching my tapes of the 2004 TDF. I'm still itching to
    get outdoors, but sweatin' to the mountain stages with Phil and Paul is
    not a bad alternative.

    JR
     
  6. R15757

    R15757 Guest

    >I'm on the front range also, and the streets around my neighborhood
    >still have wet ice on them (sigh). I've been spending my evenings on
    >the trainer watching my tapes of the 2004 TDF. I


    Come on guys. It was up to 50F yesterday
    and will go beyond today. The main roads are
    completely dry.
     
  7. [email protected] wrote:

    > In New Jersey, it never stops raining. I can't get any real outdoor
    > riding in. I am glad I signed up for a spin class. I am too much of a
    > novice to take a bike out in inclement weather. I fell over when it was
    > a beautiful sunny day. I can't imagine what would happen if I rode in
    > the rain. Plus at my age, I would take forever to heal if I broke
    > something. But I will not give up. I will focus, ride, train and do
    > my 25 mile ride for MS on my birthday. YES I WILL!!!!!


    I'm no spring chicken and decided years ago that I was too
    old to be crashing on my bike.

    But I am now entering my third year of "ice biking" via
    commuting to work. So far no problems with the snow or
    cold (quite a bit of the former my first year, and the
    latter last year here in western MA).

    But cold rain? Pretty much avoid it. Just really can't
    get into a rain, either drizzle or steady, during cold
    weather.


    SMH
     
  8. TomP

    TomP Guest

    Didn't you get the memo; it's called Global Warming! We're all gonna die!

    Max wrote:

    > I've was quietly astonished to realize how warm it's been lately as i
    > made my commute in the drizzly rain w/ just shorts and a light wind
    > shell on top the last few days. I thought it got colder in december in
    > chicago. huh.
    >
    > .max
    >
    > --
    > the part of <[email protected]>
    > was played by maxwell monningh 8-p


    --
    Tp,

    -------- __o
    ----- -\<. -------- __o
    --- ( )/ ( ) ---- -\<.
    -------------------- ( )/ ( )
    -----------------------------------------

    No Lawsuit Ever Fixed A Moron...
     
  9. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Stephen Harding <[email protected]> writes:

    > But cold rain? Pretty much avoid it. Just really can't
    > get into a rain, either drizzle or steady, during cold
    > weather.


    For commuting in cold rain, I've reached the conclusion
    that two sets of rain capes, gloves, etc are pretty well
    called for. The primary set for the trip to work; the
    secondary set to be kept dry for the ride home.

    Yesterday morning at 6:30 AM I had to ride to work
    through rain heavy enough for Environment Canada to
    issue a warning. Traffic was so light that the streets
    were mine, which was rather pleasant. When I arrived
    at the site my gloves were so soaked I wrung them out,
    but my hands were still warm. Unfortunately, I had no
    way to dry them during the day. Same with the rain cape,
    and everything else I was wearing. So the ride home was
    much less comfortable than the ride out.

    I need more cargo capacity so I can pack a secondary
    set of clothes & stuff. The milk crate is no longer
    big enough. Maybe an additional single pannier would
    do the trick.


    cheers,
    Tom


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  10. "Tom Keats" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,


    >
    > For commuting in cold rain, I've reached the conclusion
    > that two sets of rain capes, gloves, etc are pretty well
    > called for. The primary set for the trip to work; the
    > secondary set to be kept dry for the ride home.


    A fan at work seems to do the trick for me -- things dry quick in front of a
    little desk fan. I circulate the gloves, socks, shoes, etc, and do open up
    the shoes as far as they'll go, but they'll all be fine in a couple of
    hours.


    --
    Warm Regards,

    Claire Petersky
    please substitute yahoo for mousepotato to reply
    Home of the meditative cyclist:
    http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm
    Personal page: http://www.geocities.com/cpetersky/
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  11. Claire Petersky wrote:

    > A fan at work seems to do the trick for me


    I had a heckler at work once.

    Slow night...
    --
    BS (no, really)
     
  12. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Claire Petersky" <[email protected]> writes:
    > "Tom Keats" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> In article <[email protected]>,

    >
    >>
    >> For commuting in cold rain, I've reached the conclusion
    >> that two sets of rain capes, gloves, etc are pretty well
    >> called for. The primary set for the trip to work; the
    >> secondary set to be kept dry for the ride home.

    >
    > A fan at work seems to do the trick for me -- things dry quick in front of a
    > little desk fan. I circulate the gloves, socks, shoes, etc, and do open up
    > the shoes as far as they'll go, but they'll all be fine in a couple of
    > hours.


    Yes, moving air seems to do more to dry things out than
    plain heat and still air. I just luv a good, windy and
    sunny afternoon to hang out my washed laundry.

    Most of my working environments (and bike parking places)
    are outdoors and totally exposed to the elements. And
    lately, the usual 'element' is rain. I have nothing to
    dry stuff on, in, or near. As soon as I get home, I hang
    my rain gear near the forced-air gas furnace, put my work
    gloves and cycling gloves up on one of the hot air ducts,
    and my work boots on my old-timer cablevision converter.
    I just drape my wool & inflammable-synthetic sweaters
    and jack shirts over the backs of chairs so air can circulate
    around them. Everything's dry & toasty again in the morning.

    The top of a computer monitor might be a good place to
    dry gloves on -- as long as they don't drip down into
    the electronics.


    cheers,
    Tom

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    -- Nothing is safe from me.
    Above address is just a spam midden.
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  13. Tom Keats <[email protected]> wrote:

    > For commuting in cold rain, I've reached the conclusion
    > that two sets of rain capes, gloves, etc are pretty well
    > called for. The primary set for the trip to work; the
    > secondary set to be kept dry for the ride home.


    Two pairs of gloves is good, and a dry pair of socks, but everything
    else is optional in my view.

    Depends on how fast you ride - windchill is bad with wet kit.

    --
    Guy
     
  14. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <1goop1e.ksrsir1vz5o3xN%[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Just zis Guy, you know?) writes:
    > Tom Keats <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> For commuting in cold rain, I've reached the conclusion
    >> that two sets of rain capes, gloves, etc are pretty well
    >> called for. The primary set for the trip to work; the
    >> secondary set to be kept dry for the ride home.

    >
    > Two pairs of gloves is good, and a dry pair of socks, but everything
    > else is optional in my view.


    My situation is complicated by the facts that
    I ride in my work clothes, and my work is mostly
    outdoors. So I might be soaked after a day's work
    for the ride home. The only place available to
    change into a dry set of clothes might be the
    portable biffy. But that's a hassle -- I figure
    just the struggle to get my boots off would likely
    tip the thing over. Okay, that's hyperbole, but I
    do need a lot more elbow room than that. It can be
    dark and scary in there, too. I prefer to keep my
    exposures to that environment limited. Anyhow,
    sometimes it would be nice to have the opportunity
    to change into a dry pair of trousers (or shorts &
    tights) to ride home in.

    > Depends on how fast you ride - windchill is bad with wet kit.


    The rain cape does well to keep the wind off me,
    particularly my hands -- it effectively provides
    another layer over my gloves, although they still
    get wet in heavy, horizontal rain.

    I've been resisting looking for itchy-scratchy,
    woollen work trousers, but I guess I've gotta.
    And maybe overalls to take to the site, put 'em
    on for work, and take 'em off at the end of the
    day. I might also look for some proper stuff sacks
    to keep things dry while transporting them. A
    good set of oilsilks would be nice to have, too.

    Another labourer I've been working with was telling
    me about how he uses baby oil for weatherproofing
    rain clothes. If it works, it'll be cheaper than
    Scotch Gard.


    cheers,
    Tom

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    Above address is just a spam midden.
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  15. Tom Keats wrote:

    > The top of a computer monitor might be a good place to
    > dry gloves on -- as long as they don't drip down into
    > the electronics.


    Been doing that for years.

    At first, I thought the blocked air vents on the back of
    the monitors might cause premature failure due to over
    heating, but since the machines weren't mine...

    Never lost a monitor yet through 10+ years of using them
    as glove, scarf and hat driers!


    SMH
     
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