Cold weather running

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Josh, Feb 23, 2004.

  1. Josh

    Josh Guest

    What kind of clothing would you recommend for cold weather running? I won't be running more then
    three miles (25-30 mins time) and the temperature usually hovers around 15-25 degrees Fahrenheit.
    (this will also be in the morning)

    Thanks for any help.

    Josh
     
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  2. Dot

    Dot Guest

    Josh wrote:
    > What kind of clothing would you recommend for cold weather running? I won't be running more then
    > three miles (25-30 mins time) and the temperature usually hovers around 15-25 degrees Fahrenheit.
    > (this will also be in the morning)

    synthetic pants or tights, long-sleeve synthetic top and maybe a windshell, probably light mittens,
    might need a hat or earband until you warm up, then peel it off, although 30 min is pretty short. If
    it's before sunup, it may feel cooler than if you've got sun beating down on you. If you tend to
    feel cold, then a short-sleeve t or a vest might be helpful at cooler end of those temps. Synthetic
    or wool socks. Big thing is to avoid cotton, esp. for base layers.

    Dot hatless and mittenless in Alaska this evening

    --
    "Success is different things to different people" -Bernd Heinrich in Racing the Antelope
     
  3. Red_74

    Red_74 Guest

    > might need a hat or earband until you warm up, then peel it off,

    Would you recommend the same for 0-5 F?

    > hatless and mittenless in Alaska this evening

    :))

    cheers,
    --
    Red_74
    http://linx.by/red_74
     
  4. Mwright

    Mwright Guest

    "Red_74" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > might need a hat or earband until you warm up, then peel it off,
    >
    > Would you recommend the same for 0-5 F?

    I would, and do. Also, my earband is a fleecy wraparound band (called 180 degrees?) which has a
    gentle inner . . . spring to hold from the back (without having to wrap completly around the
    forehead). When you get warm, wrap it around your upper arm (pops on very easily).

    But this is unnecessary for me right now! 53 degrees F predicted tomorrow, saw a few daffodil
    shoots pushing up in the park the other day. It'll get colder again though before spring is really
    here. Maybe :)

    >
    > > hatless and mittenless in Alaska this evening
    >
    > :))
    >
    > cheers,
     
  5. Dot

    Dot Guest

    Red_74 wrote:
    >>might need a hat or earband until you warm up, then peel it off,
    >
    >
    > Would you recommend the same for 0-5 F?

    At 0-5F, for me, I most likely would start with a hat or balaclava, maybe with neoprene earband
    under it, then peel when/if warm. When running in bright sun during day, I'd be more likely to use
    less than when running in dark since solar radiation can really warm a person up when working hard,
    whether it be running, xc sking, or snowshoe running. I'm also more likely to wear more when running
    along road than on tree-lined trail, because of breeze. Also, we have winds that can come up pretty
    quickly (calm to 30-40mph in less than 1 hr) so that's *always* in my mind when heading out.

    Dot

    --
    "Success is different things to different people" -Bernd Heinrich in Racing the Antelope
     
  6. Red_74

    Red_74 Guest

    > Also, my earband is a fleecy wraparound band (called 180 degrees?) which has a gentle inner . . .
    > spring to hold from the back (without having to wrap completly around the forehead). When you get
    > warm, wrap it around your upper arm (pops on very easily).

    Sounds like a good idea.

    --
    Red_74
    http://linx.by/red_74
     
  7. Gone Tag .

    Gone Tag . Guest

    On Wed, 25 Feb 2004 15:08:06 GMT, "Red_74" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >> Also, my earband is a fleecy wraparound band (called 180 degrees?) which has a gentle inner . .
    >> . spring to hold from the back (without having to wrap completly around the forehead). When you
    >> get warm, wrap it around your upper arm (pops on very easily).
    >
    >Sounds like a good idea.

    This is the funniest/stupidest thread I've *ever* read on rec.running.

    Congratulations to all contributors!
     
  8. Ed prochak

    Ed prochak Guest

    Dot <[email protected]#att.net> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Josh wrote:
    > > What kind of clothing would you recommend for cold weather running? I won't be running more then
    > > three miles (25-30 mins time) and the temperature usually hovers around 15-25 degrees
    > > Fahrenheit. (this will also be in the morning)
    >
    > synthetic pants or tights, long-sleeve synthetic top and maybe a windshell, probably light
    > mittens, might need a hat or earband until you warm up, then peel it off, although 30 min is
    > pretty short. If it's before sunup, it may feel cooler than if you've got sun beating down on you.
    > If you tend to feel cold, then a short-sleeve t or a vest might be helpful at cooler end of those
    > temps. Synthetic or wool socks. Big thing is to avoid cotton, esp. for base layers.
    >
    > Dot hatless and mittenless in Alaska this evening

    Dot, you didn't think I'd let the cotton comment go by did you? 8^)

    Actually, now that I've tried (an admittedly low end) synthetic clothing, I do find they have
    advantages over natural fibers like cotton. Synthetics are great. But don't feel like you have to go
    out and spend lots of money in order to run in the cold. If you don't already have those clothes,
    the real key to cold weather dressing is layering. Then you can take outer layers off, unzip, or
    roll up sleeves as you get warm. And the reverse as things get cooler.

    I've used multiple layers of all cotton in those temps and been very comfortable. Long sleeve tee
    shirts, with an outer layer of either a sweatshirt, long sweatpants and shorts, gloves, sweatband
    (over the ears) and long scarf. Or an outer layer of a cotton lined running suit (less snow sticks
    to the synthetic outer layer). Below 20 I try to have three layers on top (body and arms) and 2-3
    layers on the bottom (hips and legs).

    In very windy conditions I've also worn sky goggles. But I found they fog up unless there is enough
    air circulation (wind).

    If you are going to buy synthetic clothes, start with something like coolmax socks. They are good
    for both winter and summer.

    Another idea, if you are really unsure of your cold weather clothing, is to plan your route so that
    you have bailout points. My typical runs go near several friends' homes so that if I felt unable to
    safely finish, I can stop by and call home for a ride. IOW, always leave yourself a safe way home.

    FOr short runs, like Dot said, this isn't critical. You need to dress warm but not overdress. If you
    can feel the cold as you step out the door, you are likely dressed well enough. If you now feel cold
    after 10minutes running, them you may have underdressed.

    Experiment. you'll find what works for you. Ed
     
  9. Dot

    Dot Guest

    Ed prochak wrote:
    >
    >
    > Dot, you didn't think I'd let the cotton comment go by did you? 8^)
    >
    > Actually, now that I've tried (an admittedly low end) synthetic clothing, I do find they have
    > advantages over natural fibers like cotton. Synthetics are great. But don't feel like you have to
    > go out and spend lots of money in order to run in the cold.

    Right. I don't equate synthetics with expensve, necessarily. Except for my Sporthills and some
    powerdry tights, top, and shell, most of my clothing gear is Duofold from Campmor = cheap. I could
    go for a run with all synthetic clothes where no single item cost more than $15 (most < $10) -
    except for my shell, which was about $40. Until 2.5 years ago when I started running longer and
    the airlines lost my luggage with my beloved breathable windshell (*never* had sweat accumulate in
    it), I wore cotton for running (never skiing) even in subzero F, but I was only out for 20-30 min
    on roads. I've gotten wet too many times in cotton jeans in the field to even think about going
    for an extended run in cotton these days. And power dry layers are so much more comfortable than
    Wal-Mart sweats :)

    If you don't
    > already have those clothes, the real key to cold weather dressing is layering. Then you can take
    > outer layers off, unzip, or roll up sleeves as you get warm. And the reverse as things get cooler.

    And this is a major benefit of layering. I'm somewhat mystified by some newer gear where they
    combine the layers in one garment.
    >
    >
    > If you are going to buy synthetic clothes, start with something like coolmax socks. They are good
    > for both winter and summer.

    Now, you didn't think I'd let you get away with this coolmax comment did you? ;) I ended up
    switching from coolmax to several other synthetics - because of cold feet in winter, wet summer
    weather, blisters in summer with coolmax.

    >
    > Experiment. you'll find what works for you.

    yep!

    Dot

    --
    "Success is different things to different people" -Bernd Heinrich in Racing the Antelope
     
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