Comfort bike: Specialized Vs. Trek



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S

Striker

Guest
I'm just getting started again riding a bike for leisure and exercise. I've come to the conclusion
that what I need/want is a comfort bike. After looking around here in about 5 or 6 shops I've
narrowed it down to either the Trek Navigator 200 or the Specialized Expedition Sport.

The price is almost the same (within about $10) as well as the specs. I'm fairly convinced that
either is going to be sufficient. The shop that offers the Trek is not only closer but seems to have
slightly better service and support.

So suffice it to say I'm leaning toward the Trek. Anyone have any insight on this, are these two
bikes even or is there something else I should consider?

Thanks,

Strike
 
R

Rich Clark

Guest
"striker" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

> The shop that offers the Trek is not only closer but seems to have slightly better service and
> support.

That's the persuasive argument right there. The differences between bikes in this category are far
less significant than the differences between shops.

RichC
 
E

Eric S. Sande

Guest
>So suffice it to say I'm leaning toward the Trek. Anyone have any insight on this, are these two
>bikes even or is there something else I should consider?

The Trek is fine.

As far as are there deeper considerations among bicycles, of course there are.

Does the bicycle sing to you? Admittedly teaching a bicycle to sing is somewhat similar to a Chinese
proverb, but does it?

Think about this, somewhere along the line that bicycle is going to become something that is either
a source of freedom or remorse.

Better the former.

--

_______________________ALL AMIGA IN MY MIND_______________________ ------------------"Buddy Holly,
the Texas Elvis"------------------
__________306.350.357.38>>[email protected]__________
 
S

Steve Shapiro

Guest
striker <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> I'm just getting started again riding a bike for leisure and exercise. I've come to the conclusion
> that what I need/want is a comfort bike. After looking around here in about 5 or 6 shops I've
> narrowed it down to either the Trek Navigator 200 or the Specialized Expedition Sport.

Both bikes are OK. Unfortunately, they both have suspension forks. The latest fad in comfort /
upright bikes is to include a suspension front fork. These add cost and significant weight, but
provide no benefit. None. Consider that with your upright riding position, most of your weight
will be on the rear wheel. So the saddle and shock absorbing seatpost will help absorb the worst
bumps. But it is the tires that do most of the work. The nice, wide 35 or 38 mm tires that come on
these bikes do a fine job of smoothing out the smaller irregularities in the road. The suspension
fork will weigh in at over 4 pounds (vs. 2 for a plain steel fork) and probably add $50 or $100 to
the cost of the bike. I replaced the suspension fork on my hybrid with a plain steel fork and it
rides better.

I'd suggest that you look around for a similar bike but with no suspension fork like a Marin
Larkspur and give it a try before you buy. Other then that, I hope you enjoy your new bike and
ride it lots.

Steve Shapiro [email protected]
 
J

John

Guest
I 2nd the opinion on front suspension forks. My Trek hybrid also has a front suspension fork and all
it does is eat up pedalling energy when I stand up. Bikes like this usually have a seat-post
suspension that should be adequate.

> Both bikes are OK. Unfortunately, they both have suspension forks. The latest fad in comfort /
> upright bikes is to include a suspension front fork. These add cost and significant weight, but
> provide no benefit. None. Consider that with your upright riding position, most of your weight
> will be on the rear wheel. So the saddle and shock absorbing seatpost will help absorb the worst
> bumps. But it is the tires that do most of the work. The nice, wide 35 or 38 mm tires that come on
> these bikes do a fine job of smoothing out the smaller irregularities in the road. The suspension
> fork will weigh in at over 4 pounds (vs. 2 for a plain steel fork) and probably add $50 or $100 to
> the cost of the bike.
 
K

Keith Boone

Guest
John wrote:
> I 2nd the opinion on front suspension forks. My Trek hybrid also has a front suspension fork and
> all it does is eat up pedalling energy when I stand up. Bikes like this usually have a seat-post
> suspension that should be adequate.
>
>
>>Both bikes are OK. Unfortunately, they both have suspension forks. The latest fad in comfort /
>>upright bikes is to include a suspension front fork. These add cost and significant weight, but
>>provide no benefit. None. Consider that with your upright riding position, most of your weight
>>will be on the rear wheel. So the saddle and shock absorbing seatpost will help absorb the worst
>>bumps. But it is the tires that do most of the work. The nice, wide 35 or 38 mm tires that come on
>>these bikes do a fine job of smoothing out the smaller irregularities in the road. The suspension
>>fork will weigh in at over 4 pounds (vs. 2 for a plain steel fork) and probably add $50 or $100 to
>>the cost of the bike.

I 3rd the opinion on front suspension forks. I bought a Giant "comfort" hybrid this year and now
realize that it was a mistake. All the comfort you could ask for is provided by the large tires.
 
B

Bernie

Guest
Keith Boone wrote:

> John wrote:
> > I 2nd the opinion on front suspension forks. My Trek hybrid also has a front suspension fork and
> > all it does is eat up pedalling energy when I stand up. Bikes like this usually have a seat-post
> > suspension that should be adequate.
> >
> >
> >>Both bikes are OK. Unfortunately, they both have suspension forks. The latest fad in comfort /
> >>upright bikes is to include a suspension front fork. These add cost and significant weight, but
> >>provide no benefit. None. Consider that with your upright riding position, most of your weight
> >>will be on the rear wheel. So the saddle and shock absorbing seatpost will help absorb the worst
> >>bumps. But it is the tires that do most of the work. The nice, wide 35 or 38 mm tires that come
> >>on these bikes do a fine job of smoothing out the smaller irregularities in the road. The
> >>suspension fork will weigh in at over 4 pounds (vs. 2 for a plain steel fork) and probably add
> >>$50 or $100 to the cost of the bike.
>
> I 3rd the opinion on front suspension forks. I bought a Giant "comfort" hybrid this year and now
> realize that it was a mistake. All the comfort you could ask for is provided by the large tires.

A friend has gifted me with a Giant Sedona. It has suspension forks. That is not my style either. I
like the bike tho, and I definitely do not want to look a gift horse in the mouth, and make my dear
friend feel bad. So! Question is, can I lock the forks, so the suspension is completely disabled?
Sorry I am not looking at it right now, it is at my friend's place. Bernie
 
S

Steve Shapiro

Guest
> A friend has gifted me with a Giant Sedona. It has suspension forks. That is not my style either.
> I like the bike tho, and I definitely do not want to look a gift horse in the mouth, and make my
> dear friend feel bad. So! Question is, can I lock the forks, so the suspension is completely
> disabled? Sorry I am not looking at it right now, it is at my friend's place. Bernie

You don't say what kind of fork it is. Mine was a Rock Shox Metro and it had a "preload" adjustment
on the top of the fork crown. By adjusting it to the maximum setting, the fork could be made
stiffer. The shock absorbing action was poor if at all in my fork but handeling was not an issue. My
bike was always steady and went where I pointed
it. I just hated the 2 extra pounds I was lugging around for no reason. If yours is so spongy that
it is annoying, or if you feel it does not handle well, I'd recommend that you take back to the
store where it was bought. If it handles OK, the fork is not such a bad thing.

What a great gift. You've got good friends.

Steve Shapiro [email protected]
 
B

Bernie

Guest
Steve Shapiro wrote:

>
> What a great gift. You've got good friends.
>
> Steve Shapiro [email protected]

Too true! I do. I believe these forks can be dialed stiffer. Will try it shortly. Bernie
 
S

Striker

Guest
So are you saying that if you hit a pothole or manhole cover that the front shock will do absolutely
nothing? Our roads here in Va. are terrible, just awful and the old Giant Rincon I'm riding jarrs
the hell out of my arms over some of these bumps.

Strike

Steve Shapiro wrote:

> striker <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> > I'm just getting started again riding a bike for leisure and exercise. I've come to the
> > conclusion that what I need/want is a comfort bike. After looking around here in about 5 or 6
> > shops I've narrowed it down to either the Trek Navigator 200 or the Specialized Expedition
> > Sport.
>
> Both bikes are OK. Unfortunately, they both have suspension forks. The latest fad in comfort /
> upright bikes is to include a suspension front fork. These add cost and significant weight, but
> provide no benefit. None. Consider that with your upright riding position, most of your weight
> will be on the rear wheel. So the saddle and shock absorbing seatpost will help absorb the worst
> bumps. But it is the tires that do most of the work. The nice, wide 35 or 38 mm tires that come on
> these bikes do a fine job of smoothing out the smaller irregularities in the road. The suspension
> fork will weigh in at over 4 pounds (vs. 2 for a plain steel fork) and probably add $50 or $100 to
> the cost of the bike. I replaced the suspension fork on my hybrid with a plain steel fork and it
> rides better.
>
> I'd suggest that you look around for a similar bike but with no suspension fork like a Marin
> Larkspur and give it a try before you buy. Other then that, I hope you enjoy your new bike and
> ride it lots.
>
> Steve Shapiro [email protected]
 
B

Buck

Guest
"striker" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> So are you saying that if you hit a pothole or manhole cover that the front shock will do
> absolutely nothing? Our roads here in Va. are terrible, just awful and the old Giant Rincon I'm
> riding jarrs the hell
out
> of my arms over some of these bumps.
>
> Strike

There are usually three arguments against suspension on the street: weight, bobbing as you pedal,
and extra maintenance. The first is definitely a difference, but weight lowers as you get more
expensive shocks. Bobbing is a problem with a poor pedaling style and if the suspension isn't set up
properly. You have to get a spring that is set for your weight and get the "sag" set up correctly as
well as the proper damping. For the road, a fork should be pretty stiff to avoid bobbing. The extra
maintenance isn't too bad if you stick to the roads. It ceratinly isn't as bad as off-roading all
the time, something which rarely gets mentioned around here.

There are definitely some differences in efficiency, but I can't tell you how much is attributable
to suspension and how much belongs to bike design. I commuted for years on a full-suspension
mountain bike with slicks. It was the cushiest ride around. The suspension motion made me very aware
of my pedalling style and I'm a much smoother rider because of it. Switching over to a road bike
added a bit to my speed, but really only changed my commute time by a couple of minutes or so.

That being said, you can make a big difference in your current ride by putting on larger tires with
a lower pressure. It isn't suspension, but it will make a difference. The bike that spends the most
time out of my garage these days is my rigid mountain bike with slicks and fenders. It is more
comfortable than the road bike, but more efficient than the full-suspension and the trailer connects
more easily. However, I admit that I was thinking of a new suspension fork for it today.....

Anyone who tries to tell you that a tire will soak up a pothole or a 1-inch tall patch/manhole
cover/expansion joint/etc. is mistaken. If you are the kind of rider that just plows through,
suspension will make a huge difference. If you are the kind of rider who uses finesse to get over
the rough stuff, then suspension is a waste of time, energy and money.

-Buck
 
S

Steve Shapiro

Guest
"Buck" <j u n k m a i l @ g a l a x y c o r p . c o m> wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> "striker" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> > So are you saying that if you hit a pothole or manhole cover that the front shock will do
> > absolutely nothing? Our roads here in Va. are terrible, just awful and the old Giant Rincon I'm
> > riding jarrs the hell
> out
> > of my arms over some of these bumps.
> >
> > Strike
>
> There are usually three arguments against suspension on the street: weight, bobbing as you pedal,
> and extra maintenance. The first is definitely a difference, but weight lowers as you get more
> expensive shocks. Bobbing is a problem with a poor pedaling style and if the suspension isn't set
> up properly. You have to get a spring that is set for your weight and get the "sag" set up
> correctly as well as the proper damping. For the road, a fork should be pretty stiff to avoid
> bobbing. The extra maintenance isn't too bad if you stick to the roads. It ceratinly isn't as bad
> as off-roading all the time, something which rarely gets mentioned around here.

The answer to Strike's question is yes, as far as I can tell it did nothing. I used it for off the
road trails that are far from "technical" but that have their share of rocks protruding from the
ground. I received all the jolts and jars that I get with a Tange steel fork on the same bike with
the same tires (700X35.) Now, I can swap forks back and forth easily, but I never use the suspension
fork for road or off road. I just like the ride of the plain steel fork better.

I also think Buck's comments are valid. But they apply to good suspension forks. The issue here is
that inexpensive hybrid bikes come with bottom of the line, cheap suspension forks. This is a reason
why they don't work. Also hybrid bikes are generally fit so that the rider's weight is mostly on the
rear wheel. So, relaxed elbows and sholders, combined with wide tires and, perhaps, a suspension
seat post, can provides a nice ride over most paved surfaces.

If suspension is important for poorly paved roads, then a lighter weight, quality suspension fork
can be added for $300 or $400 I think. Even better, if one has some long green to part with, ($1500
or so) Gary Fisher makes a couple of 29 inch (same as 700C)diameter tire mountain bikes that have
quality suspension parts.

For inexpensive hybrid bikes in my opinion the suspension forks are a marketing ploy. It would be
better to skip the suspension fork and either pay less for the bike, or pay the same and get name
brand components. The value of these options may not be obvious to the consumer vs. an easy to
explain option like a suspension fork. It nets the manufacturer and retailer a few extra bucks
without comensurate benefit to the buyer. I think it's too bad.

Steve Shapiro
 
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