Comfy road shoes

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by jarodwinn, Apr 14, 2010.

  1. jarodwinn

    jarodwinn New Member

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    I know this is an open ended question, but I have to ask it any how. I'm coming in off an awesome 50 mile ride today and I'm stoked to see that my legs are getting back into shape... I did a hard 50 mile effort and my legs feel like they still have quite a bit of life left in them, however, my feet are KILLING me!
    I'm currently using the Diadora Speed Racer shoes and though they were comfy at first, they are really starting to hurt now. I've changed the soles to Dr Soles thinking that maybe that was the problem but it hasn't helped. The majority of the pain is coming from the ball of the foot area and extends into the toes. I've tried loosening the toe straps to the point that my foot has nearly slipped out of the shoe and still not much luck with comfort.
    I have a wider foot with high arches. I know I'm not the only rider out there that has feet like mine so I'm wondering if any of you may have recommendations on shoes. I know that I gotta get what's comfy to me, but with all the options out there I'd like to try to narrow down my choices if possible.
    PLEASE help! I'm singed up for a few centuries already this year and right now my feet can barely get through 50 miles :confused:.
    Thanks in advance for the help.
     
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  2. pat5319

    pat5319 New Member

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    Could be several causes, several fixes

    You may be "pushing down" on your pedal too Long:
    Try starting to pull back at 3 o'clock postion, it's "faster" and more effecient. Power is best applied 90' to the crank arm

    narrow shoes:
    Try Sidi "Megas" or other mfrs wider "lasted" shoes like Northwave or Diadora

    You may need a Metatarsal arch support, it's across the ball of your foot, better ski shops know about 'em, if a podiatrist is unaffordable

    Your foot could be supinating, kinda like flatfeet but different:
    You could try orthotics (expensive) but "Superfeet" makes very good a "footbed" that often helps by giving more support. YOu can get stock as well as custom footbeds and they do make a cycling specific bed that's thinner than their others. Besides affording comfort they boost power as well as they keep your fooot more stable, "no twisting", and they also will align your ankle as well.

    You could be running too much air in your tires, or are using some too "skinny" for the distance or road conditions, either cause road shock/vibrations to "transmit" right into the bottoms of your shoes. Forget pumping to "max pressure" onlong rides. Rule of thumb-
    1. Pinch your tires, if they "give" a bit is good. If they're "rock hard" let some air out. Tires actually roll better when they have a little "resilience" anyway.
    2. Run tires that are slightly wider than your rims- more cushion/better ride, less pinch flats, less vibrations, better grip/cornering. I knwoguys who won't run anything smaller than a "25". They'll be more predictable too as they can be "rounder". Oval tires change the geometry of the turn, some brands like B******r just don't get round -Gack

    If your tire walls are stiff than make em ride rough too, find some with supple sidewalls cotton is good- like vittoria cx or Gommitalias, some synthetics are good too like- Michelins. Silk tubulars/sew-ups are best, no they ARE incredible!!!, in performance too, but they're $150 require extra wheels and messy to glue on. If I had $300 burning a hole in my pocket I'd buy 'em in a hearbeat ( I do have a set tubular wheels with cotton sew-ups, silk N/A when I bought em)
     
  3. jarodwinn

    jarodwinn New Member

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    Pat, thanks for the info. I just bought new tires this spring, went with the Conti GP4000's. I usually only pump them up to 100-110 PSI... they ride exceptionaly well. I was thinking of the Vittoria CX or the Open Pave's but non of the bike shops had them in stock at the time I was buying. I think I will give 25mm tires a chance next time I'm looking for a new pair.
    A long while back I used orthodics, but that was when I could afford them... different story now. I've tried various arch supports in the past, but they seemed to only cause hot spots in the arch of my foot.
    I'll look around for the superfeet.
    Thanks again for the help.
     
  4. dhk2

    dhk2 Active Member

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    One common remedy for the pain you describe is to move the cleats back as far as possible.
     
  5. jarodwinn

    jarodwinn New Member

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    I've heard of that, but that can lead to knee problems which I've already got
     
  6. 64Paramount

    64Paramount Active Member

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    Wish I could help, but I've got flat feet.


    ( they match my head :eek: )
     
  7. rparedes

    rparedes New Member

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    Try a wider platform pedal. Try spinning at higher cadence; less pushing on higher gears.
     
  8. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    Diadora cycling shoes have historically been among the narrowest, so my estimation is that they're crushing your flanges (the long foot bones--you have five) into the metatarsal nerves and arteries. Keep that up and it can lead to permanent inflammation.

    Wider shoes are available. In roughly descending order of width are mega-width Sidi, Northwave, Bontrager, Specialized, and Shimano.

    Northwave have crappy insoles, so replace them with aftermarket beds such as Specialized or SuperFeet.

    Bontrager insoles have high arches, too high for most people, which is why the shoes aren't selling all that well. The toe box is quite roomy, too.

    Specialized are slightly wider at the ball, but their high performance shoes are quite snug midfoot. The Body Geometry insoles that come in the shoes and can be purchased separately are the class act of the cycling shoe biz. Just about any cycling shoe can be made to fit and work better with these insoles.

    Shimano are medium+, but the higher priced shoes are more like straight mediums.

    The new Pearl Izumi road shoes also rate your consideration. I'm told they fit narrow, but I've had more customers who say they're too wide than the opposite. I haven't been able to find my size, so I can't give my personal estimation. All I can say is they appear to be at least medium width and very well made.
     
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