Comments Please; long.

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Alan, Jun 4, 2004.

  1. Jenny

    Jenny Guest

    Alan,

    You did a fine revision. I hope they pay some attention to
    what you had to say!

    -- Jenny - Low Carbing for 4 years. At goal for weight.
    Type 2 diabetes, hba1c 5.4. Cut the carbs to respond to my
    email address!

    Low carb facts and figures, my weight-loss photos, tips,
    recipes, strategies for dealing with diabetes and more at
    http://www.geocities.com/jenny_the_bean/

    Looking for help controlling your blood sugar? Visit http://www.alt-support-
    diabetes.org/Newly%20Diagnosed.htm

    "Alan" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]...
    > On Thu, 03 Jun 2004 11:03:56 +1000, Alan
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >G'day All
    > >
    > >X-posted to misc.health.diabetes, alt.support.diabetes
    > >
    > >I would appreciate comments on the draft letter below.
    > >The letter is intended for my local Diabetes Australia
    > >quarterly magazine.
    > >
    > >I feel a little like Spartacus heading off to the arena;
    > >"we who are about to die salute you". I'm not an expert,
    > >so I know I'm asking to be drawn and quartered here, but
    > >I'd respect informed, civil criticism before I "go to
    > >press" :)
    > >
    > >If I'm wrong or uninformed, I'm happy to debate the point
    > >or modify the letter as long as things stay civil.
    >
    > Thanks to everyone who gave advice on my draft letter,
    > both here and by email. I've included a copy of the final
    > epistle below. I sent it today, so too late to tell me
    > it's a load of garbage now :)
    >
    > It will be interesting to see if they publish, I may be
    > too late for this quarter's edition. I cut the words down
    > from 1200+ to about 520.
    >
    > Thanks again for the constructive advice.
    >
    > Letter:
    >
    > To The Editor I am eternally grateful for the work the
    > pioneers at Diabetes Australia did in helping us get the
    > NDSS and the support system that we now have. The
    > organisation continues to do a great job. But I have a
    > basic difficulty with the logic of the dietary advice
    > recommended by your dieticians.
    >
    > I see their advice like this:
    > 1. Dieticians advise high complex carbohydrate
    > consumption, apparently for heart, kidney and vascular
    > health;
    > 2. High complex carbohydrate consumption causes high blood
    > glucose levels;
    > 3. High blood glucose levels cause diabetic complications
    > such as retinopathy, neuropathy, nephropathy and heart
    > disease;
    > 4. DA dieticians therefore recommend balancing the high
    > complex carbohydrate consumption with medication or
    > insulin to control blood glucose levels. This advice
    > appears to be in line with the recommendations of
    > overseas organisations such as the American Diabetes
    > Association (ADA).
    >
    > Specific examples can be found on the DA web-site at
    >
    http://www.diabetesaustralia.com.au/multilingualdiabetes/he-
    althpros/foodnut/ healthy.htm
    > or the ADA web-site at http://www.diabetes.org/nutrition-and-
    > recipes/nutrition/starches.jsp .
    >
    > My difficulty in understanding this is because no-one
    > seems to be investigating the alternative approaches.
    > I don't mean herbs and supplements, just a better diet
    > for diabetics, together with exercise, to enable
    > minimal medication.
    >
    > To me, the most obvious alternative is to search for a
    > diet for the diabetic which provides adequate
    > nutrition for good health but does not cause high
    > blood glucose levels. If such a diet is possible it
    > would minimise the need for medication, particularly
    > for type 2, with side benefits for overall health and
    > health costs. I can attest that it is possible; I've
    > done it, as have many others. However, when diabetics
    > write to give examples, such as K ...... in the Autumn
    > issue, they are dismissed and told that their
    > improvement must be because of exercise, or weight
    > loss, or some other factor.
    >
    > The method I followed, as a type 2, was simple. I
    > started with a standard, sensible diet to lose weight.
    > Then, as I followed that diet, I tested everything I
    > ate one hour and two hours after I ate it. If I
    > consistently found that something led to high blood
    > glucose, I changed
    > it. Sometimes I changed the food, sometimes the quantity,
    > sometimes the timing, but always the aim was to
    > minimise "spikes". Gradually I found I was eating
    > significantly less carbohydrates, a little more
    > protein and a little more "good" oils. And I did a
    > little "lazy man's" exercise along the way. I also
    > gradually reduced the high level of initial testing
    > as results became predictable.
    >
    > After attaining a degree of control over my blood
    > glucose, I now progressively review my diet to ensure
    > there are no missing nutritional requirements and to
    > further improve lipids etc. At diagnosis in 2002 my
    > HbA1c was 8.2, now it's 5.9 and I take no diabetes
    > medications. It's a long time since I've seen a
    > "spike" over 8, rarely over 7.5. The improvements
    > continued long after I reached my target weight. And
    > my heart, blood pressure, lipids, kidneys and so on
    > are also in good shape. Why do your dieticians
    > continue to promote high carbohydrate consumption?
    > What is it I'm missing, apart from complications?
    >
    > Cheers, Alan, T2 d&e, Australia. Remove weight and carbs
    > to email.
    > --
    > Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
     


  2. Annette

    Annette Guest

    A great letter Alan,

    I would be most happy to send a letter of support, IF they
    publish it. In effect, I'd just be saying that I also have
    followed a similar plan, with equally good results. Send me
    an email if you know, before I do, that the letter has been
    taken seriously.

    I could never have written such a great epistle, and
    want you to know I greatly admire your work. You have
    the knack of stating the truth of that matter with
    simplicity and tact.

    Well done!

    Annette

    "Alan" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]...
    > On Thu, 03 Jun 2004 11:03:56 +1000, Alan
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >G'day All
    > >
    > >X-posted to misc.health.diabetes, alt.support.diabetes
    > >
    > >I would appreciate comments on the draft letter below.
    > >The letter is intended for my local Diabetes Australia
    > >quarterly magazine.
    > >
    > >I feel a little like Spartacus heading off to the arena;
    > >"we who are about to die salute you". I'm not an expert,
    > >so I know I'm asking to be drawn and quartered here, but
    > >I'd respect informed, civil criticism before I "go to
    > >press" :)
    > >
    > >If I'm wrong or uninformed, I'm happy to debate the point
    > >or modify the letter as long as things stay civil.
    >
    > Thanks to everyone who gave advice on my draft letter,
    > both here and by email. I've included a copy of the final
    > epistle below. I sent it today, so too late to tell me
    > it's a load of garbage now :)
    >
    > It will be interesting to see if they publish, I may be
    > too late for this quarter's edition. I cut the words down
    > from 1200+ to about 520.
    >
    > Thanks again for the constructive advice.
    >
    > Letter:
    >
    > To The Editor I am eternally grateful for the work the
    > pioneers at Diabetes Australia did in helping us get the
    > NDSS and the support system that we now have. The
    > organisation continues to do a great job. But I have a
    > basic difficulty with the logic of the dietary advice
    > recommended by your dieticians.
    >
    > I see their advice like this:
    > 1. Dieticians advise high complex carbohydrate
    > consumption, apparently for heart, kidney and vascular
    > health;
    > 2. High complex carbohydrate consumption causes high blood
    > glucose levels;
    > 3. High blood glucose levels cause diabetic complications
    > such as retinopathy, neuropathy, nephropathy and heart
    > disease;
    > 4. DA dieticians therefore recommend balancing the high
    > complex carbohydrate consumption with medication or
    > insulin to control blood glucose levels. This advice
    > appears to be in line with the recommendations of
    > overseas organisations such as the American Diabetes
    > Association (ADA).
    >
    > Specific examples can be found on the DA web-site at
    >
    http://www.diabetesaustralia.com.au/multilingualdiabetes/he-
    althpros/foodnut/healthy.htm
    > or the ADA web-site at http://www.diabetes.org/nutrition-and-
    > recipes/nutrition/starches.jsp .
    >
    > My difficulty in understanding this is because no-one
    > seems to be investigating the alternative approaches.
    > I don't mean herbs and supplements, just a better diet
    > for diabetics, together with exercise, to enable
    > minimal medication.
    >
    > To me, the most obvious alternative is to search for a
    > diet for the diabetic which provides adequate
    > nutrition for good health but does not cause high
    > blood glucose levels. If such a diet is possible it
    > would minimise the need for medication, particularly
    > for type 2, with side benefits for overall health and
    > health costs. I can attest that it is possible; I've
    > done it, as have many others. However, when diabetics
    > write to give examples, such as K ...... in the Autumn
    > issue, they are dismissed and told that their
    > improvement must be because of exercise, or weight
    > loss, or some other factor.
    >
    > The method I followed, as a type 2, was simple. I
    > started with a standard, sensible diet to lose weight.
    > Then, as I followed that diet, I tested everything I
    > ate one hour and two hours after I ate it. If I
    > consistently found that something led to high blood
    > glucose, I changed
    > it. Sometimes I changed the food, sometimes the quantity,
    > sometimes the timing, but always the aim was to
    > minimise "spikes". Gradually I found I was eating
    > significantly less carbohydrates, a little more
    > protein and a little more "good" oils. And I did a
    > little "lazy man's" exercise along the way. I also
    > gradually reduced the high level of initial testing
    > as results became predictable.
    >
    > After attaining a degree of control over my blood
    > glucose, I now progressively review my diet to ensure
    > there are no missing nutritional requirements and to
    > further improve lipids etc. At diagnosis in 2002 my
    > HbA1c was 8.2, now it's 5.9 and I take no diabetes
    > medications. It's a long time since I've seen a
    > "spike" over 8, rarely over 7.5. The improvements
    > continued long after I reached my target weight. And
    > my heart, blood pressure, lipids, kidneys and so on
    > are also in good shape. Why do your dieticians
    > continue to promote high carbohydrate consumption?
    > What is it I'm missing, apart from complications?
    >
    > Cheers, Alan, T2 d&e, Australia. Remove weight and carbs
    > to email.
    > --
    > Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
     
  3. Pinecone

    Pinecone Guest

    Alan <[email protected]> wrote

    > Thanks to everyone who gave advice on my draft letter,
    > both here and by email. I've included a copy of the final
    > epistle below. I sent it today, so too late to tell me
    > it's a load of garbage now :)

    The longer I experiment, the more right I think you are. I
    hope they publish your letter.
     
  4. Alan

    Alan Guest

    On Thu, 17 Jun 2004 22:41:32 +1000, "Annette" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >A great letter Alan,
    >
    >I would be most happy to send a letter of support, IF they
    >publish it. In effect, I'd just be saying that I also have
    >followed a similar plan, with equally good results. Send me
    >an email if you know, before I do, that the letter has been
    >taken seriously.
    >
    >I could never have written such a great epistle, and want
    >you to know I greatly admire your work. You have the
    >knack of stating the truth of that matter with simplicity
    >and tact.
    >
    >Well done!
    >
    >Annette
    >
    >
    >"Alan" <[email protected]> wrote in
    >message news:[email protected]...
    >> On Thu, 03 Jun 2004 11:03:56 +1000, Alan
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> >G'day All
    >> >
    >> >X-posted to misc.health.diabetes, alt.support.diabetes
    >> >
    >> >I would appreciate comments on the draft letter below.
    >> >The letter is intended for my local Diabetes Australia
    >> >quarterly magazine.
    >> >
    >> >I feel a little like Spartacus heading off to the arena;
    >> >"we who are about to die salute you". I'm not an expert,
    >> >so I know I'm asking to be drawn and quartered here, but
    >> >I'd respect informed, civil criticism before I "go to
    >> >press" :)
    >> >
    >> >If I'm wrong or uninformed, I'm happy to debate the
    >> >point or modify the letter as long as things stay civil.
    >>
    >> Thanks to everyone who gave advice on my draft letter,
    >> both here and by email. I've included a copy of the final
    >> epistle below. I sent it today, so too late to tell me
    >> it's a load of garbage now :)
    >>
    >> It will be interesting to see if they publish, I may be
    >> too late for this quarter's edition. I cut the words down
    >> from 1200+ to about 520.
    >>
    >> Thanks again for the constructive advice.
    >>
    >> Letter:
    >>
    >> To The Editor I am eternally grateful for the work the
    >> pioneers at Diabetes Australia did in helping us get the
    >> NDSS and the support system that we now have. The
    >> organisation continues to do a great job. But I have a
    >> basic difficulty with the logic of the dietary advice
    >> recommended by your dieticians.
    >>
    >> I see their advice like this:
    >> 1. Dieticians advise high complex carbohydrate
    >> consumption, apparently for heart, kidney and vascular
    >> health;
    >> 2. High complex carbohydrate consumption causes high
    >> blood glucose levels;
    >> 3. High blood glucose levels cause diabetic complications
    >> such as retinopathy, neuropathy, nephropathy and heart
    >> disease;
    >> 4. DA dieticians therefore recommend balancing the high
    >> complex carbohydrate consumption with medication or
    >> insulin to control blood glucose levels. This advice
    >> appears to be in line with the recommendations of
    >> overseas organisations such as the American Diabetes
    >> Association (ADA).
    >>
    >> Specific examples can be found on the DA web-site at
    >>
    >http://www.diabetesaustralia.com.au/multilingualdiabetes/h-
    >ealthpros/foodnut/healthy.htm
    >> or the ADA web-site at http://www.diabetes.org/nutrition-and-
    >> recipes/nutrition/starches.jsp .
    >>
    >> My difficulty in understanding this is because no-one
    >> seems to be investigating the alternative approaches.
    >> I don't mean herbs and supplements, just a better
    >> diet for diabetics, together with exercise, to enable
    >> minimal medication.
    >>
    >> To me, the most obvious alternative is to search for
    >> a diet for the diabetic which provides adequate
    >> nutrition for good health but does not cause high
    >> blood glucose levels. If such a diet is possible it
    >> would minimise the need for medication, particularly
    >> for type 2, with side benefits for overall health and
    >> health costs. I can attest that it is possible; I've
    >> done it, as have many others. However, when diabetics
    >> write to give examples, such as K ...... in the
    >> Autumn issue, they are dismissed and told that their
    >> improvement must be because of exercise, or weight
    >> loss, or some other factor.
    >>
    >> The method I followed, as a type 2, was simple. I
    >> started with a standard, sensible diet to lose
    >> weight. Then, as I followed that diet, I tested
    >> everything I ate one hour and two hours after I ate
    >> it. If I consistently found that something led to
    >> high blood glucose, I changed
    >> it. Sometimes I changed the food, sometimes the
    >> quantity, sometimes the timing, but always the aim
    >> was to minimise "spikes". Gradually I found I was
    >> eating significantly less carbohydrates, a little
    >> more protein and a little more "good" oils. And I
    >> did a little "lazy man's" exercise along the way. I
    >> also gradually reduced the high level of initial
    >> testing as results became predictable.
    >>
    >> After attaining a degree of control over my blood
    >> glucose, I now progressively review my diet to ensure
    >> there are no missing nutritional requirements and to
    >> further improve lipids etc. At diagnosis in 2002 my
    >> HbA1c was 8.2, now it's 5.9 and I take no diabetes
    >> medications. It's a long time since I've seen a
    >> "spike" over 8, rarely over 7.5. The improvements
    >> continued long after I reached my target weight. And
    >> my heart, blood pressure, lipids, kidneys and so on
    >> are also in good shape. Why do your dieticians
    >> continue to promote high carbohydrate consumption?
    >> What is it I'm missing, apart from complications?
    >>
    >> Cheers, Alan, T2 d&e, Australia. Remove weight and carbs
    >> to email.
    >> --
    >> Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
    >

    Postscript

    Hi Annette, and all who helped.

    I must have been too late for publication, the latest issue
    just arrived. I've never received a response.

    I doubt that they ever will publish. We aren't on the same
    wavelength. Read this reply to the final letter on page 13
    (for those who didn't know, Conquest is the official
    magazine of Diabetes Australia):

    The letter:

    " I have type 2 diabetes and try to eat a sensible diet but
    on reading through the "Nestle Diet Delights" insert in the
    Spring 2003 Conquest I was alarmed to see that most of the
    recipes were high in sugar and carbohydrates. Can you tell
    me why the hearty sweet potato salad recipe in the booklet,
    with 62 gm carbohydrate and 26 gm sugar, is suitable for
    people with diabetes?"

    The reply:

    "As a rough guide the average Australian adult should aim to
    eat 45-60 grams of carbohydrate at main meals and 0-30 grams
    for snacks. This amounts to 135-270 grams of carbohydrate a
    day. The amount of total sugar in a recipe does not give you
    any indication of how that food will affect your blood
    glucose levels. <snip> The most useful tool for determining
    the effect of a carbohydrate food on an individual's blood
    glucose level is the glycemic index." Oh - duh! So what is
    the GI of sugar?

    So it comes as no surprise that the official "Eat Smart
    Recipe" featured on the inside back cover is: Home Made
    Muesli Bar: main ingredients rolled oats, brown sugar,
    flour, sultanas, oatbran and milk. Nutrition Facts: 1 serve
    (about the size of a small cookie) Energy 498 kj Carbs 20 gm
    Fat 3 gm incl 0.5 gm sat. Fibre 1.3 gm GI = medium.

    I wonder what they would classify as high GI?

    Frustrated and fuming, Alan
    --
     
  5. Alan

    Alan Guest

    On Thu, 01 Jul 2004 12:25:33 +1000, Alan
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I doubt that they ever will publish. We aren't on the same
    >wavelength. Read this reply to the final letter on page 13
    >(for those who didn't know, Conquest is the official
    >magazine of Diabetes Australia):

    Just a clarification - that letter I quoted wasn't from me;
    I just quoted it as an example of the thinking of their
    dieticians.

    Cheers, Alan
    --
     
  6. Hemyd

    Hemyd Guest

    "Alan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Thu, 17 Jun 2004 22:41:32 +1000, "Annette"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >A great letter Alan,
    > >
    > >I would be most happy to send a letter of support, IF
    > >they publish it.
    In
    > >effect, I'd just be saying that I also have followed a
    > >similar plan, with equally good results. Send me an email
    > >if you know, before I do, that the letter has been taken
    > >seriously.
    > >
    > >I could never have written such a great epistle, and want
    > >you to know I greatly admire your work. You have the
    > >knack of stating the truth of that matter with simplicity
    > >and tact.
    > >
    > >Well done!
    > >
    > >Annette
    > >
    > >
    > >"Alan" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > >message
    > >news:[email protected]...
    > >> On Thu, 03 Jun 2004 11:03:56 +1000, Alan
    > >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>
    > >> >G'day All
    > >> >
    > >> >X-posted to misc.health.diabetes, alt.support.diabetes
    > >> >
    > >> >I would appreciate comments on the draft letter below.
    > >> >The letter is intended for my local Diabetes Australia
    > >> >quarterly magazine.
    > >> >
    > >> >I feel a little like Spartacus heading off to the
    > >> >arena; "we who are about to die salute you". I'm not
    > >> >an expert, so I know I'm asking to
    be
    > >> >drawn and quartered here, but I'd respect informed,
    > >> >civil criticism before I "go to press" :)
    > >> >
    > >> >If I'm wrong or uninformed, I'm happy to debate the
    > >> >point or modify
    the
    > >> >letter as long as things stay civil.
    > >>
    > >> Thanks to everyone who gave advice on my draft letter,
    > >> both here and by email. I've included a copy of the
    > >> final epistle below. I sent it today, so too late to
    > >> tell me it's a load of garbage now :)
    > >>
    > >> It will be interesting to see if they publish, I may be
    > >> too late for this quarter's edition. I cut the words
    > >> down from 1200+ to about 520.
    > >>
    > >> Thanks again for the constructive advice.
    > >>
    > >> Letter:
    > >>
    > >> To The Editor I am eternally grateful for the work the
    > >> pioneers at Diabetes Australia did in helping us get
    > >> the NDSS and the support system that we now have. The
    > >> organisation continues to do a great job. But I have a
    > >> basic difficulty with the logic of the dietary advice
    > >> recommended by your dieticians.
    > >>
    > >> I see their advice like this:
    > >> 1. Dieticians advise high complex carbohydrate
    > >> consumption, apparently for heart, kidney and
    > >> vascular health;
    > >> 2. High complex carbohydrate consumption causes high
    > >> blood glucose levels;
    > >> 3. High blood glucose levels cause diabetic
    > >> complications such as retinopathy, neuropathy,
    > >> nephropathy and heart disease;
    > >> 4. DA dieticians therefore recommend balancing the high
    > >> complex carbohydrate consumption with medication or
    > >> insulin to control blood glucose levels. This advice
    > >> appears to be in line with the recommendations of
    > >> overseas organisations such as the American Diabetes
    > >> Association (ADA).
    > >>
    > >> Specific examples can be found on the DA web-site
    > >> at
    > >>
    >
    >http://www.diabetesaustralia.com.au/multilingualdiabetes/h-
    >ealthpros/foodnut
    /healthy.htm
    > >> or the ADA web-site at http://www.diabetes.org/nutrition-and-
    > >> recipes/nutrition/starches.jsp .
    > >>
    > >> My difficulty in understanding this is because no-
    > >> one seems to be investigating the alternative
    > >> approaches. I don't mean herbs and supplements,
    > >> just a better diet for diabetics, together with
    > >> exercise, to enable minimal medication.
    > >>
    > >> To me, the most obvious alternative is to search
    > >> for a diet for the diabetic which provides adequate
    > >> nutrition for good health but does not cause high
    > >> blood glucose levels. If such a diet is possible it
    > >> would minimise the need for medication,
    > >> particularly for type 2, with side benefits for
    > >> overall health and health costs. I can attest that
    > >> it is possible; I've done it, as have many others.
    > >> However, when diabetics write to give examples,
    > >> such as K ...... in the Autumn issue, they are
    > >> dismissed and told that their improvement must be
    > >> because of exercise, or weight loss, or some other
    > >> factor.
    > >>
    > >> The method I followed, as a type 2, was simple. I
    > >> started with a
    > >> standard, sensible diet to lose weight. Then, as I
    > >> followed that diet,
    I
    > >> tested everything I ate one hour and two hours after I
    > >> ate it. If I consistently found that something led to
    > >> high blood glucose, I changed
    > >> it. Sometimes I changed the food, sometimes the
    > >> quantity, sometimes
    the
    > >> timing, but always the aim was to minimise "spikes".
    > >> Gradually I found
    I
    > >> was eating significantly less carbohydrates, a little
    > >> more protein and
    a
    > >> little more "good" oils. And I did a little "lazy
    > >> man's" exercise along the way. I also gradually reduced
    > >> the high level of initial testing as results became
    > >> predictable.
    > >>
    > >> After attaining a degree of control over my blood
    > >> glucose, I now
    > >> progressively review my diet to ensure there are no
    > >> missing nutritional
    > >> requirements and to further improve lipids etc. At
    > >> diagnosis in 2002
    my
    > >> HbA1c was 8.2, now it's 5.9 and I take no diabetes
    > >> medications. It's a long time since I've seen a
    > >> "spike" over 8, rarely over 7.5. The improvements
    > >> continued long after I reached my target weight. And
    > >> my heart, blood pressure, lipids, kidneys and so on
    > >> are also in good
    shape.
    > >> Why do your dieticians continue to promote high
    > >> carbohydrate consumption? What is it I'm missing,
    > >> apart from complications?
    > >>
    > >> Cheers, Alan, T2 d&e, Australia. Remove weight and
    > >> carbs to email.
    > >> --
    > >> Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
    > >
    >
    > Postscript
    >
    > Hi Annette, and all who helped.
    >
    > I must have been too late for publication, the latest
    > issue just arrived. I've never received a response.
    >
    > I doubt that they ever will publish. We aren't on the same
    > wavelength. Read this reply to the final letter on page 13
    > (for those who didn't know, Conquest is the official
    > magazine of Diabetes Australia):
    >
    > The letter:
    >
    > " I have type 2 diabetes and try to eat a sensible diet
    > but on reading through the "Nestle Diet Delights" insert
    > in the Spring 2003 Conquest I was alarmed to see that most
    > of the recipes were high in sugar and carbohydrates. Can
    > you tell me why the hearty sweet potato salad recipe in
    > the booklet, with 62 gm carbohydrate and 26 gm sugar, is
    > suitable for people with diabetes?"
    >
    > The reply:
    >
    > "As a rough guide the average Australian adult should aim
    > to eat 45-60 grams of carbohydrate at main meals and 0-30
    > grams for snacks. This amounts to 135-270 grams of
    > carbohydrate a day. The amount of total sugar in a recipe
    > does not give you any indication of how that food will
    > affect your blood glucose levels. <snip> The most useful
    > tool for determining the effect of a carbohydrate food on
    > an individual's blood glucose level is the glycemic
    > index." Oh - duh! So what is the GI of sugar?
    >
    > So it comes as no surprise that the official "Eat
    > Smart Recipe" featured on the inside back cover is:
    > Home Made Muesli Bar: main ingredients rolled oats,
    > brown sugar, flour, sultanas, oatbran and milk.
    > Nutrition Facts: 1 serve (about the size of a small
    > cookie) Energy 498 kj Carbs 20 gm Fat 3 gm incl 0.5 gm
    > sat. Fibre 1.3 gm GI = medium.
    >
    > I wonder what they would classify as high GI?
    >
    > Frustrated and fuming, Alan
    > --
    >
    Alan,

    In one edition of their magazine, a few years ago, I read a
    comment that 'Australian sugar was not as bad as normal
    sugar'. Also, at one stage I attended a 'seminar' for
    beginners where the main hall was encircled with not only
    drug and testing equipment company stands, but stands of
    various sweet carby snacks, professing themselves to be
    'healthy', but ones that almost made my bg go up just
    looking at them!

    And yet, a few years ago I attended another seminar
    organised by Diabetes Victoria, where the guest speaker was
    a Rocco DiVincenzo, a most vocal and expressive proponent of
    the new diet which we know about here - he called it the
    "inverted pyramid diet", where amongst other issues he
    stated that eating carbs of any sort in any but the most
    minor amounts as not a very good idea. It was fireworks!

    Henry Australia
     
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