Commonwealth Games Ballot - question about cyber-scalping

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Walrus, May 30, 2005.

  1. Walrus

    Walrus New Member

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    I got my Games ballot allocation last night. I missed out on getting track cycling finals, but managed to snap up some cheap seats to one of the day sessions. We also got some other tickets to athletics and gymnastic finals as well as the opening ceremony.

    My question is regarding cyber-scalping...ie. selling tickets on eBay or other internet based sales engines. What is the story here? You see concert tickets on there all the time, but we don't seem to hear much in the news about people getting busted. My thinking is that if the price goes above the retail price, then it's scalping. :confused:

    I might want to sell one of my athletics sessions further down the track, any comments?
     
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  2. Shabby

    Shabby New Member

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    The only way you can legally make money on Ebay from selling tickets is by having a "Buy It Now" price that is the ticket's face value, then charge a massive postage and handling fee. But there's always a clause on the back of the ticket that basically says if you resell it the ticket can be made invalid. Before electronic ticketing that wasn't a real threat, but these days it's pretty simple for Vodafone Arena to nullify your ticket.

    Not sure what recourse you'd have if you bought tickets on Ebay and got blocked from entering - probably not much given that you willingly breached the terms and conditions of the original ticket sale.
     
  3. Walrus

    Walrus New Member

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    How would they know to nullify your ticket? They don't know that you've sold it...
     
  4. Carl Brewer

    Carl Brewer Guest

    On Tue, 31 May 2005 10:38:34 +1000, Walrus
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >Shabby Wrote:
    >> Before electronic ticketing that wasn't a real threat, but these days
    >> it's pretty simple for Vodafone Arena to nullify your ticket.

    >How would they know to nullify your ticket? They don't know that
    >you've sold it...


    It's also probably a restraint of trade issue. If I own something
    (legal!) I can sell it, as it's mine. This includes cans of soft
    drink with "not for resale" written on them, and tickets. There's
    some funky laws about tickets brought in to quell the footy fans
    around grandfinal time, but would they stand up to a real fight in
    court?
     
  5. Shabby

    Shabby New Member

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    A ticket is a contract, not an asset, with it's terms and conditions written in fine print on the back. Hence, if it's not transferrable as one of the conditions, then it's not transferrable.
     
  6. Shabby

    Shabby New Member

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    Games organisers contact Police.
    Police contact Ebay.
    Police contact Ticketmaster.
    Tickets get cancelled, people don;t get into cycling.
     
  7. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    That's what it says on the ticket, but if challenged in court would it
    stand up? Might have to ask the ACCC :)
     
  8. Shabby

    Shabby New Member

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    Go ahead Carl, you might even get to pay some court costs as well as a criminal conviction.
     
  9. flyingdutch

    flyingdutch New Member

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    ... OR one could, theoretically, be a supplier to M2006, theoretically, and be offered tickets to ANY event they wish in return for discount on tendered services, theoretically speaking of course!

    F"Games-bound-supplier"Dutch
     
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